Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakDecember 22, 2017
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3min141

If you own an older iPhone and have been wondering if you were crazy for thinking your device is slower all of a sudden – don’t worry, you’re not.

The rumours that circulated for a long time turned out to be true: Apple makes older iPhones operate more slowly.

iPhone users have been complaining that their phones were slowed down every time a new model is released, usually (and suspiciously enough) after an update. Plenty of users support the theory that, in this way, Apple purposely limits the performance of their devices in order to boost sales of new models.

Apple admitted that it takes steps to slow down the performance of older phones. However, a spokesperson claimed to have their consumers’ best interest at heart:

“Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices. Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components. 

Last year we released a feature for iPhone 6, iPhone 6s and iPhone SE to smooth out the instantaneous peaks only when needed to prevent the device from unexpectedly shutting down during these conditions. We’ve now extended that feature to iPhone 7 with iOS 11.2, and plan to add support for other products in the future.”

So, according to their statement, Apple does this to prevent your phone from suddenly shutting down or having trouble operating. In theory, the operating system should start slowing down only when your battery is low or very old or in case of cold temperature.

In reality, many users noticed that their iPhones went from perfect condition to becoming unbearably slow after an update. It’s more puzzling that there are iPhone 5 users who refuse to update their software and claim that their device works perfectly.

The bottom line is that customers are not happy with Apple’s lack of transparency and demand to be notified when their phones’ performance is about to be limited, as well as given choice to decide whether they will allow this slowdown or not.


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakAugust 9, 2017
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8min121

We had an opportunity to talk to Gordon Cartwright, the Executive General Manager at The Isle of Eriska Hotel, Spa and Golf – a lovely haven located on the west coast of Scotland. Staying on a private island is probably one of the most relaxing and exquisite experiences that anyone can imagine; among else, Eriska’s guests can feast their eyes on breath-taking views of Loch Linnhe and the dramatic Morvern Mountains, as well as enjoy fine dining in Eriska’s Michelin star restaurant. The Hilltop Reserves lodges offer a perfect experience to those who prefer self-catering. We were eager to learn from Gordon what it’s like to run an entire island.

Hello Gordon, could you first tell us what the Isle of Eriska offers to the guests, other than astonishing view and nature?

Gordon: Eriska is about a step change for our guests, a step back from the fast pace of life and a place where they can totally relax in a stunningly beautiful environment.

You’ve managed different hotels in the course of your career – how does managing a private island differ from managing a hotel?

Gordon: Every day is different with challenges for the team you don’t usually get in your mainland hotel. Being remote means you have to plan multi levels of redundancy when systems falter, suppliers don’t make their deliveries on time, or staff have illness. Nothing is on our doorstep here. At times, we have to improvise with a plan B or C that’s as polished as plan A.

An exquisite resort like the one you manage must attract a great number of clientele with high expectations – are you always able to meet them?

Gordon: Yes and No. For the most part our daily planning and focus on the individual guests’ needs more often exceeds the expectation of our guests. But on the occasion, we can’t impress because expectations are out of kilter – it’s our job to bring those expectations round to create a positive result. We don’t get a lot of disgruntled guests but when we do we embrace the guest with increased care.

What is, in your opinion, a common mistake that people make in the hospitality industry? Is there something you consider completely unacceptable in your line of business?

Gordon: Increasingly, driven by commercial pressures, hotels are becoming so process driven that guests aren’t provided with a truly unique and memorable experience. I travel extensively and find myself in so many soulless hotels where staff training and a genuine connection with the guest isn’t really the focus. The definition of hospitality is how well one person builds a rapport with another. This should always be the priority. Sadly, hotels are becoming business models in which pressure on the balance sheet squeezes out the resources required to deliver the WOW! Factor.

The food served in your restaurant must be quite an experience – could you give us a sneak peek into your menu? Which dishes your clients simply must try out?

Gordon: Having dined in literally thousands of top restaurants across the world I genuinely feel that what we deliver at Eriska is wonderfully unique. The kitchen has fully embraced nature to the extent that 90% of our garnishes are either grown or foraged on the island with the daily harvesting of ingredients just a few hours before dinner. This creates an incredibly fresh flavour experience because ingredients are not losing their flavours in the supply chain. To answer your question directly, our clients need to try everything!

What would you say defines a luxury customer experience and takes your clients’ stay to the next level?

Gordon: The key training mantra at Eriska, that one quality that we seek to wow our guests with is, generosity of spirit from everyone who works at Eriska. Whatever facilities we provide might never be enough, whatever interior design we invest in might not suit all, whatever we equip our bedrooms with might fall short to some, but a really genuine, flawless smile with deep engagement with the guest is always well received. This is why 60% of our market are return guests and why most of our guests aren’t met with a corporate smile, but more often with hugs afforded to returning friends.

Your Hilltop Reserves self-catering lodges have been a huge success, and you will soon launch additional four properties on the island. What is the Hilltop Reserves Experience like?

Gordon: I’ve been privileged in my career to have spent quite a lot of time in some amazing accommodation around the world. I would put our Hilltops in the top 1% in terms of sheer unadulterated luxury dropped into a breath-taking wilderness environment. The juxtaposition between the raw setting and the sumptuous luxury behind the glass never ceases to impress our guests.

What is the biggest challenge for you, as the Isle of Eriska’s General Manager?

Gordon: We set the bar high at Eriska in terms of quality and service and not reaching the required standard is not forgiving on either the colleague or the guest. There are no easy days at Eriska as GM, nor should there be and I have no doubt that many of my peers in the industry face daily pressures in pursuit of excellence. The greatest challenge as GM of Eriska is to make sure myself and my team stay focussed on the guest experience and not purely the processes that underpin what we do. We can’t forget how it feels to be one of our own guests.

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakMay 22, 2017
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13min201

We had the honour of speaking with Greg Searle, an Olympic gold medallist who won the coxed pairs event at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics – and 20 years later decided that there’s no reason for him not to enter the Olympic Games again. By winning a bronze medal in the men’s eight at London 2012, he proved that the key to overcoming self-doubt is knowing what you’re capable of, pushing your limits, and above all – believing in yourself regardless of what others think. Greg is now Chief Innovation Officer at Keys Business Concierge, using his knowledge and experience to help organisations support their employees to perform at their best.

CXM: People know you as an Olympic gold medallist, but are most likely less familiar with your business side. Could you tell us what your role at Keys Business Concierge is and how long have you been working there?

Greg: I’ve been working there for about 6 months, and my role is to bring a new approach to our product and how we take it to our customers. I’ve worked for 20 years as a business coach, and everything I do is about helping employees to feel more engaged with the companies they work for. Ultimately I would say it’s about improving people’s working life.

CXM: You recently hosted The UK Employee Experience Awards, and according to everyone who attended, made the entire event more inspiring. Was there perhaps a particular organisation or an individual you spoke to and found inspiring?

Greg: I would say all of the stories were inspiring – it’s inspiring to meet people who are maximising the working experience of their employees. These people go the extra mile to make people’s jobs engaging and meaningful, and to give them good training so that they’re equipped to do the job, but are also equipped to be better people – and that is really interesting to hear. There was one particular group whose story stayed with me – it was really good to hear about CrossCountry’s great leadership programme, in what way they engaged all their leaders and their team and what they considered to be the driving factors for their performance.

CXM: How does Keys Business Concierge aid businesses deliver a world-class employee experience within the workplace?

Greg: I think most of us come to work with a things-to-do list and we don’t get to the bottom of it. There’s always more to do than there are hours in the day – and we have to wrestle with getting the job done and getting our personal lives sorted out. There’s everything from shopping to booking a holiday to organising any treats that we might want for ourselves, our partners or our children. Keys Concierge provides the service where there’s someone else to support you with all of your personal and lifestyle needs. You can pick up the phone and speak to a real person who can help you to organise your life.

CXM: In your opinion, when engaging employees within the workplace, what impact does removing external interference have on employee performance?

Greg: I think that to perform our best we need to focus on our tasks at hand; our mind needs to be present and not distracted by other factors that get in the way of us delivering our best. Whether that is standing up and making a presentation, having a sales meeting with clients or being in our office and completing our reports on time – there are so many things that stop us from getting our actual jobs done. What we’re looking to do is cut down on all that interference so that we balance up how you use your time as effectively as possible.

In all walks of life, we wrestle between doing the jobs which need to be done now – I’d say the current needs of our job; but we also have in mind the future requirements of planning things that are further out – whether that’s innovating for our customers, creating a marketing strategy, developing our people or investing into new systems.

However, we often don’t get around to doing those important future-focused things, because we get bogged down in less important immediate requirements. So, removing external interference takes away the less important current issues to let us focus on the more important longer term future-planning issues.

CXM: What would you say is the key to improving employee experience, generally?

Greg: I could say four things here. Putting people back in control would be the first thing. Normally we’re out of control, there’s too much to do – and having someone to assist you helps you put things in control.

I would also say that having a sense of belonging, a good team experience and having someone who’s on your side is equally important – so, again, we provide someone who’s on your side and helping you.

The third thing would be having a sense of accomplishment and getting things done, giving people good feedback and recognition – that’s another thing that gives people a good experience.

And finally, I would say that doing something which is meaningful and feeling like you’ve made a difference is something that improves employee experience and engagement.

CXM: In your opinion, can a parallel be made between being a successful businessman and a successful sportsman? Are there key traits, such as persistence and willpower that lead to success, or talent and luck play the major role here?

Greg: No, I would say in both situations, to be successful in sports or in business, you need an amount of talent. But there are two things that make the difference which come across: one is having personal resilience – which is about learning from every experience and becoming stronger, always keeping in mind that no one has a completely smooth path in anything. It’s about how you get back up and carry on going.

And I would say that the other thing is having a learning mindset – being ready to learn, being ready to react to feedback and improve. In sports, there’s a huge need to keep learning and keep improving. You know the concept that ‘better never stops’? That’s quite a nice expression – ‘better never stops’. You have to be ready to keep learning and that is exactly the same and true in work.

CXM: If you don’t mind me asking, what compelled you to make that big comeback, and have another go at the Olympics 2012? Do you remember the exact moment, by any chance?

Greg: Yes, I do remember the exact moment. In 2009 I was in Poznan, in Poland, commentating at the world rowing championships, and I remember being part of the competition but only standing there watching it as a commentator, talking about it. I felt a desire to be a bigger part of this, and I had a belief in myself –a belief that I’d be capable of racing and winning a gold medal.

I was driven by the desire to improve and learn more, and the inspiration of London was massive for me. I knew that my children would be there to watch and I thought how they would then be 9 years old and 11 years old, so if I competed I would be able to be a good role model to them.

The vision for London, the overall heading for the Olympics was to inspire a generation. So I realised that I could inspire my generation if I could show them that I could be a competitor and try to win a gold medal.

CXM: Were there sceptics who thought that you wouldn’t make it to the Olympic podium again after 20 years?

Greg: If there were sceptics, then I couldn’t hear them. I had enough belief that they could think I might not, but I wasn’t listening. I was only listening to the voice in my head.

CXM: What do you think makes winning such a unique experience?

Greg: I think for me it is about striving to push yourself and achieve things that are stretching for you.

What I’m about to say is genuinely true: I won a gold medal at the Olympics, but the feeling of crossing the line when I won the Olympics was the same feeling I got when I won the junior world championships when I was 18. It’s the same feeling that I got when I completed the London marathon, even though I didn’t get a prize, I wasn’t winning – it was just my personal achievement across the line. It’s the same feeling I get when I see my daughter and my son achieving their ambitions. It’s the same feeling inside of personal challenge, stretch and achievement.

CXM: Greg, thank you for this wonderful and inspiring interview, it’s been a real pleasure talking to you.

Interesting Links:

 


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakMay 22, 2017
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7min145

According to numerous sources, there was something fishy about this year’s BAFTA TV Awards. ‘The Crown’ fans were cheering for their beloved show that was nominated in 5 different categories, only to be disappointed by the result: The Crown won 0 awards.

What’s the big deal?

According to a leading director, the chat in the industry was that The Crown was something really special. The whole matter might have gone unnoticed if the show won at least one of the awards, and it was nominated for best leading actress, best supporting actress, best drama and twice for best supporting actor. BAFTA judges decided that the best drama award should go to Happy Valley (for the second time) and the best actress title to its star Sarah Lancashire instead. The Crown was over-looked.

A Successful Night for the Beeb

It so happened that 19 out of 25 awards went to the BBC – which leaves many wondering would The Crown have won if it were a BBC production? And why wasn’t it?

The BBC had actually planned to share this show with Netflix – but that scenario turned out to be too expensive. Some could not help but wonder if this is some kind of retribution for Netflix – and if it is, it sure makes the BBC look like a sore loser. When contacted, Netflix representatives refused to comment!

Now, some might think that this sort of a decision is justified – after all, BAFTA jurors were only supporting nationally broadcasted shows. However, is this really the way to do it – by holding a biased award ceremony?

When you think about it, it actually does more harm than good to everyone involved. The BAFTA’s credibility is now questionable, The Crown got unnecessary bad publicity, and their fans were left with a bitter taste in their mouth.

Of course, the thought that The Crown wasn’t really that great a show might cross some people’s minds. But, why then was it nominated for five different BAFTA awards? And why has Claire Foy won a Golden Globe for best actress? This ridiculous scenario could actually harm BAFTA’s reputation more than any of the other parties involved.

Is This Sort of Thing Really That Dangerous to an Awards Event’s Credibility?

It is, because as soon as any external factor affects the judging process, it becomes obvious that there is no point in competing – the decision has already been made.

When reading this story, I was immediately drawn to thinking about our partners, The Customer Experience Awards, and the way they organise their judging. Their scoring methodology and criteria are endorsed by Cranfield, the leading international business school. Apart from that, their judging process is transparent – the criteria and process is there on their website for everyone to see and there is certainly no chance of any external factors affecting the judges’ decision. The judges are independent business men and women, who apply to judge, whose CVs and credentials are validated and checked for any potential conflict of interest.

“And that is the basis for any competion– objectivity, clarity and a guaranteed fair judging process. Only when these criteria are fulfilled, an awards event can hope to further build its reputation”. Says Neil Skehel, CEO of Awards International, the operators of the UK Customer Experience Awards.

The UK Customer Experience Awards is now in its 9th year. Despite their continuously growing reputation and the fact that The UKCXA is already the biggest and most compelling customer experience event in the world, their organisers have taken a few risks but consider it vital to ensure the judging process is robust and credible.

“Removing objectivity from the judging process will hurt any awards, and especially business awards” – Skehel adds.

Reputation isn’t something once obtained and yours to keep forever – unless you keep working on it. Respecting each entrant equally is a must for the UKCXA – from large companies such as Virgin Money, Microsoft and Barclays, to each and every SME that enters the awards.

When it comes to the awards events, glamour is nothing if you can’t have fairness. Fortunately, at The Customer Experience Awards, you can have both. Find out more here.

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakApril 13, 2017
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3min148

The first brewery that was built by crowd funding ten years ago keeps expanding rapidly. It all started in one of its co-founder’s mother’s garage – and right now they employ 800 people and keep opening bars all over the world. Their edgy craft beers and punk attitude have created an entire cult around the Brewdog brand.

Their shareholders – pardon – Equity Punks, now have a good reason to crack open a few bottles, as San Francisco-based private equity house agreed to buy 22% of the company. This means that early investors in Brewdog will now be able to make a return of 2,800%, as this ‘punk’ beer firm’s worth is now estimated at 1£bn. A wonderful outcome, especially considering the fact that the company owners had to use a £20,000 bank loan a decade ago to even start brewing!

They promise to remain focused on their goal to make others as passionate about craft beer as they are, which is why they quit their jobs and started brewing in the first place. The two co-founders won’t allow the deal to go to their heads, but ‘Martin did buy himself a new jumper’, as we learn from James.

Jokes aside, not only are they making the world a better place by brewing great craft beer and educating their customers to choose quality beer over generic industrial sludge – they also strive to be the best place to work, all the time.

We witnessed their wonderful employee-based initiatives, ‘The Unicorn Fund’ and ‘DogTales‘, being awarded at The UK Customer Experience Awards. They won two categories for their outstanding increase in employee engagement which they achieved in the most imaginative and thoughtful ways.

After all, how many employees can say that they share 10% of their company’s profit evenly among themselves, are informed about company goings on by a fun and engaging newsletter, and always feel like they’re a part of their company’s success? For now, not many.

Check out their ‘Decade of Dog’ video below, and to the Brewdog crew we just have to say – keep up the good work, you punks.

 

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakMarch 22, 2017
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4min123

CXM is proud to announce that  Confirmit, a company that enables organisations to develop and implement different business programmes, became the headline sponsor of this year’s UK Customer Experience Awards and the event sponsor of Winning With CX, both events hosted by Awards International.

‘We chose to work with Confirmit, not just because they provide a great technology, but it was very clear early on that they really wanted our program to succeed.’ – Paula McKillen, RS Components

Confirmit is an organisation that helps businesses develop and apply Voice of the Customer, Employee Engagement and Market Research programmes that deliver insight and drive business change. With their help, Confirmit’s clients create multi-channel, multi-lingual feedback and research programmes that engage customers, empower employees, deliver a compelling respondent experience, and provide a high return on investment.

Joint Efforts in Improving CX and Recognising Customer Experience Experts

Confirmit, The UK Customer Experience Awards and Winning With CX share the same passion about the customer experience, which is today one of the most important aspects of differentiating one’s business.

The UK Customer Experience Awards was launched 8 years ago and is now the biggest and most compelling CX award event in the world. The Awards are judged by panels of independent businessmen and women, and their scoring methodology and criteria are endorsed by Cranfield, the leading international business school.

Awards International’s post event feedback reports with scores and judges’ comments, which are provided to all finalists, are just one thing that makes this event truly unique.

This year’s Customer Experience Awards will run throughout the day and into the into the evening. Finalists will present during the day and be joined by supporters and colleagues at an exclusive black tie gala Awards ceremony and dinner. The event will take place at the InterContinental London – the O2, on 28 September 2017.

What Is the Difference Between The UK Customer Experience Awards and Winning With CX?

Winning With CX is another event hosted by Awards International, which brings together UK Customer Experience Awards 2016 winners and finalists. As well as giving award-winning companies and finalists an opportunity to share their success stories it also brings together the UK’s most influential customer experience professionals. The event will be held in Park Plaza Victoria, London on 26 April.

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakMarch 14, 2017
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7min124

Every once in a while, we like to shed our little spotlight on companies that, in spite of their great initiative, haven’t made it to the podium at Customer Experience Awards organized by our partner, Awards International. Sometimes it so happens that there are more customer experience initiatives that deserve recognition, besides those that won the awards.

Virgin Money has participated and won in one (or a few) of the Customer Experience Categories more than once in the last few years, and in 2016 their new Voice of Customer programme took them to the Customer Experience Awards finals.

When it comes to customer experience, listening to your customers comes first, but it’s of little use if that data isn’t interpreted and action isn’t taken based on that interpretation.

There’s Money… and there’s Virgin Money

Virgin Money’s philosophy is to always try to do things a bit differently, and upon launch they set out to disrupt the UK banking market and bring some much needed competition, with one overriding vision: to make everyone better off, and, in doing so, build a bank customers love.

Their newest goals were to drive loyalty and advocacy, and with that in mind they set out to increase:

  • Net Promoter Score (NPS)
  • Customer retention and numbers
  • Overall business revenue

The insight that they had before was useful, but didn’t provide them with a true holistic view of the customer experience their clients had, which meant that they weren’t able to precisely pinpoint areas that need to be improved.

Revamping Their Approach

To realise their objective Virgin Money decided to build a new Voice of Customer programme around 4 key areas:

1. Gather

Their new approach was to collect and connect feedback across a variety of listening posts including new regular CX surveys across ALL products. They extended real-time feedback across more customer facing areas, created new web surveys, refreshed mystery shop approach and started tracking social media comments. This sort of initiative enabled them to benchmark both internally and externally, respond quickly and in a flexible manner to different business needs and distribute insight at all levels.

2. Analyse

Armed with more info than ever before, they moved on to analysing the data and pulling together key trends and themes at product and channel levels.

They challenged themselves to quantify the value of higher NPS. They have been able to successfully prove that when compared to customers scoring their company 8 or less out of 10 for likelihood to recommend, those scoring 9 or 10 have a much higher retention rate, a more than 10% higher average product holding and higher average account balances.

3. Cascade

The primary objective of this step was to ensure all colleagues have access to VoC insight and organize a structure to work through the data in detail and agree which improvement actions to explore. Key features of this objective include that all colleagues must have access to VoC data, that everything is communicated regularly and that it’s supported by structured and embedded governance and business routines.

4. Action!

All steps 1-3 are of little value if they don’t lead to this final step and the improvement of customer experiences. Virgin Money functions on a 90-day cycle, with the first 30 days focused on the cascade of data and the following 60 days progressing improvement activities. By restarting the cycle every quarter, they can continually report on new developments and trends and add weight to existing improvement plans.

Thanks to this seemingly simple 4-step process, as a direct result, Virgin Money’s customer satisfaction level raised to an amazing 95%!

Their customer retention rate kept a steady 84% and Transactional NPS was now at its highest-ever level of +65 in the first quarter of 2016, up from +51 in 2014.

In turn, this has helped them drive high levels of customer growth with over 640.000 new customers being attracted to the VM brand.

This is an excellent example how listening to customers brings outstanding results when a company implements what they hear, the right way. This kind of initiative, as well as many others, is something that can regularly be seen at CXA, and judges recognise such initiatives as remarkable.

Simply attending the biggest and most compelling CX event in the world is a great opportunity to get inspired to improve your company.

Nurturing customer experience still is, and will continue to be, the best way to build stronger customer relationships, increase customer referrals and bring more revenue and sales.

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakMarch 9, 2017
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5min190

Nobody likes critique. It’s discouraging! Words like ‘fail’ and ‘disappointment’ instantly start popping into our head and that heart-sinking feeling surely isn’t anything to look forward to. However, taking a different approach to this seemingly worrisome situation almost always means turning a disadvantage into an advantage. This story is proof of it.

Faced with declining reputation, Homes in Sedgemoor, an ALMO organisation and the largest housing provider in Sedgemoor, decided to shake off those troubling words and feelings and replace them with the desire to change and the feeling of hope and enthusiasm.

In just one year, Homes in Sedgemoor received 107 formal complaints, awarded £10,358.12 in compensation and failed to achieve their performance indicators. On top of all that, their reputation had also been damaged by the mishandling of some damp related repairs which had appeared on BBC’s Inside Out.

It was evident that they needed to start from scratch and regain the trust of their customers. They decided to do the simplest thing imaginable: ask people questions and expect honest, sugar-coat-free answers.

This was done by their newly employed Customer Focus Officer, whose role had been previously publicised online with the intention of showing their customers that Homes in Sedgemoor now meant business.

After years of feeling as if they had been ignored, their customers now finally had somewhere to turn to and focus their attentions. More importantly, they also had someone accountable, who will answer their every question and query. Quite an improvement from a system that had three formal stages for complaints which, in some cases, meant up to two months for getting a response!

Overall changes had to be made within the entire organisation: each member did their part in putting the customer back to the heart of the company. Their solution to create a central focus for all customer feedback and then use it to implement a full cultural shift and make all the necessary changes might seem simple, but it was an overwhelming and extensive work.

After the initial feedback gathering the company put together their Customers First training which was completed by every single member of their organisation.

The results were outstanding: their formal complaint figures fell by 63% in 2015/16, compensation payments are down and now the company has a clear picture of where they are spending their money and why.

Their ‘face to a name’ approach changed the overall customer experience and how they feel about having to deal with Homes in Sedgemoor. All these initiatives combined, and the fact that they made it clear for their customers that the entire company makeover could never be possible without them, won this company an Overall Winner award at The UK Complaint Handling Awards ‘17, held by Awards International on 23 February in London.

We congratulate them for their amazing initiative, wonderful change and most of all, the courage to face a bad situation and come out as overall winners.

Interesting Links:


Jovana BošnjakJovana BošnjakFebruary 13, 2017
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2min112

Harvard’s team is developing the so-called flow battery which could last for more than 10 years. We use lithium-ion batteries to power practically everything, but the problem is, after a couple of years of frequent use they usually become useless and they aren’t easily recyclable. Liquid battery could end all these problems, and then some.

The challenge that Harvard’s researchers managed to overcome was modifying the molecules in the electrolytes so that they become stable, highly-resistant to degradation, and water-soluble. Ferrocene and viologen, when stored in neutral water, tend to lose only 1% of their capacity every 1000 cycles. This means that battery performance would remain basically the same for several years!

Longevity is not the only advantage that liquid battery has – it will also be cheaper, as safer materials are not as expensive as the polymers that are currently used for making flow batteries.

On top of that, this kind of a battery is environment-friendly; it’s not corrosive or toxic and wouldn’t cause damage to the floor in case of an accidental leakage. You could simply clean up the solution with a mop.

Liquid battery could become a perfect way to store solar and wind power.

As renewable energy is becoming more and more affordable, this kind of a long-lasting battery truly is a godsend. Installing solar panels at home will now make more sense than ever, since the price you have to pay for storing energy won’t nullify what you save on your electricity bill.

Harvard is hoping to reach the goal of creating a battery that could store energy for less than 80£ per kWh, and if this happens, renewable energy will finally become competitive with regular power plants. This could be the end of an era, and make our entire planet eco-friendly.




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