CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 7, 2019
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9min410

It’s no news that satisfied employees are one of the pillars of a successful company, but what makes an employee happy and motivated?

How do we know which processes are working well and which ones are criticised? What are the attractive factors of a workplace and what are the sources of conflict between team members? The answers to these questions can be easily found out by a suitable employee satisfaction survey and the responses can be evaluated within minutes with tools  like automated text analyzer systems. Here is an example, showing the whole process from data collection to the application of results.

To collect employee feedback quickly is a big challenge for most companies without the suitable tools, let alone the next part – the data evaluation and identification of the matching points of hundreds of responses.

However, nowadays there is no need for HR professionals to do the work manually, spending long hours with it. There are tools that cut down the evaluation time and effort, while the accuracy of the results are also better.

In this case study by media monitoring firm Neticle, we see how employee feedback can be processed quickly and easily, and how it can be used as an input for organisational development processes.

Methodology

Neticle used their own text analyser tool to uncover the opinion of every co-worker in detail about the most important factors:

  • atmosphere in the office
  • organisational structure
  • progress of the company (in business and in technological terms)
  • internal communication
  • the rights for decision-making
  • working hours
  • salary
  • tasks
  • the management

To let team members describe their opinion as accurate as possible, open-ended ones were included in the survey alongside multiple-choice questions.

To process the results, Neticle used Zurvey, an automated text analyser tool which identifies the tone of every text-based opinion as positive, negative, or neutral based on the phrases that occur in the text.

It also recognises topics, brands, locations, and persons in the text. Therefore, there was no need to analyse the survey responses manually and subjectively. The strongest and weakest points of Employee Experience within the organisation could be found out within a matter of minutes.

Results

Malfunctions in the operational processes – negative topics

The text analyser identified three critical points regarding the operation. The most frequently mentioned one was the office, indicating that that co-workers do not respect the common places in the office: they often leave dirty dishes in the kitchen, make too much noise, and speak loudly. Moreover, many complaints have been written about the office becoming “too small” for the fast-growing team.

The second pain point appeared to be the organisational structure. Many proposed the revision of the management processes and suggested that weekly status meetings could be more structured and time-saving if attended by relevant team members only.   

The other request was to have middle management. Given that Neticle is a startup with a non-hierarchical organisation structure, there is no-one between the C-level executives and other members of the team. As the survey showed, many began to feel the necessity of managers, who could coordinate within and across teams more clearly.

Besides the above, Neticle employees need more accurate briefs. As many people from different teams work on the same projects, the tasks are often fragmented and it is difficult to detect who’s in charge.

The well-functioning processes – positive topics

The average score for the question how employees like working at Neticle was 9.25 out of 10. Employees highlighted the importance of an assembled but open team where lots of friendships have been made and outdoor activities have been organised together. Because of this friendly atmosphere, employees start working happily, even on Monday mornings.

Effect came as second best, indicating that employees love being involved in important decisions because of the flat and democratic structure. This not only means that members are asked and informed about important changes, but they are also free to work from home flexibly and can turn to anyone in the team for help. The team also find it inspiring to work for a successful company where they can see the fruits of daily hard work through constant growing.

Application of the results: some examples

The honest responses made valuable insights for the process of development and helped the firm discover which areas are satisfying and which ones need improvement. Results were shared with the whole team as part of  transparent internal communication habits and solutions for the problems were discussed.

The survey data can be further used in external communication processes too. For example, the positive aspects can support the employer’s brand and attractive features can be highlighted in job advertisements also. Shared opinions of team members increase the authenticity and uniqueness of job posts, while it also can increase the number of applicants.

With a clear view of the weaknesses, companies can look for solutions, considering the workers’ suggestions. Identifying problematic areas will save time and make a HR team’s work more efficient and successful in creating an excellent Employee Experience within a company. 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 1, 2019
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5min406

While Japan may have the world’s highest debt to GDP ratio of 223.8 percent, the UK has also seen this number rise exponentially in the last 25 years.

Estimated at just 29% during the first quarter of 1993, this peaked at 87.2 percent as 2017 drew to a close.

As the UK’s national debt has soared, household liabilities have also increased across the board. We’ll explore this below by analysing a debt map of the UK and reviewing the most indebted areas of the country.

The north and south divide

At the end of 2016, the average consumer debt per person in the UK stood at £603, while this year also saw unsecured credit levels break the £200 billion barrier.

However, there’s a clear geographical divide when it comes to consumer debt in the UK, with only two postcode areas north of the Midlands being among the most indebted in the country. Warrington and Crewe had a consumer credit of £728 per capita at the end of 2016, with households in these regions continuing to struggle with mounting household debts.

At least seven postcode areas in the south featured among the nation’s most indebted regions, with East London topping this list with a per capita debt of £756. Northampton followed at £749, with Salisbury trailing close behind at £739.

The bustling town of Milton Keynes also saw its per capita debt peak at £708, joining Dartford, Redford, Reading and Slough in breaking the £700 barrier.

Other regions in the south and south-east also had a per capita value of consumer credit that was significantly higher than the national average. These included Swindon and Stevenage, each of which had a per capita debt of £681 at the end of 2016.

Conversely, the majority of northern postcodes boasted a per-capita debt that was slightly or significantly lower than the national average, with Lerwick and Bradford leading the list at £446 and £450 respectively.

The last word

With regions in the south and south east boasting the highest levels of per capital debt in the UK, it’s clear that there’s a geographic divide when it comes to consumer spending and borrowing.

The relationship between real wage growth and the cost of living is central to this trend. Earnings have generally stagnated across the board during the last decade, while the cost of living has risen, meaning that people often need a little extra help with their financial situation.

This trend was bucked at the end of last year, however, with wage growth rising by 3.2% following an incremental increase in October. This, coupled with the fact that inflation dropped to 2.1% in December of 2018, may help households to reduce their debt levels incrementally in the near-term.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 20, 2019
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10min604

Millennials have been dubbed the most ‘impatient generation’ in the workplace, with over 90 percent wanting ‘rapid career progression’.

Almost 70 percent of employers believe that this level of ambition and desire is the leading cause of conflict between generations – with a third of Generation X (34 percent) and a quarter of Baby Boomers (24 percent) and Millennials (24 percent) agreeing with this.

The findings come from a Robert Walters whitepaper, which surveyed over 2,000 respondents to find out what it takes to retain millennial professionals.

Chirs Hickey, UK CEO at Robert Walters, said: “According to our survey, almost 60 percent of workers have experienced intergenerational conflict in the workplace. As Millennials make up a growing part of the workforce, finding a way for members of different generations to work together effectively is an increasingly high priority.

“Making sure that managers understand what motivates workers from different generations, how they like to communicate, and identifying common sources of conflict is essential to creating a strong team of varied generations and diversity of opinions.”

Sources of inter-generational conflict in the workplace

1.Workplace culture

According to the Robert Walters report, three quarters of professionals (73 percent) have left a job because of poor company culture. Over half of Millennials reported that poor company culture was a source of disappointment in a new job, with 90 percent claiming that they research the culture in advance of taking an opportunity.

Whilst a third of Millennials felt that meeting their colleagues in a social setting was important, this contrasts with just 15 percent of Generation X and less than one percent of Boomers who value social outings with colleagues.

2. Technology

Millennials widely perceive technology to be at the root of workplace conflicts. Thirty-four percent reported that older workers not understanding new technology was the chief cause of these conflicts, followed by younger workers becoming frustrated at using outdated technology (33 percent).

Millennial professionals are also distinct from their older colleagues in their attitudes towards  social media. Almost 40 percent of Millennials felt that employers should actively encourage workers to incorporate social media into their work, compared to less than a quarter (24 percent) of Generation X and just 10 percent of Baby Boomers.

3. Tailored approach

Employers and employees from Generation X and Baby Boomers believe that Millennials are far more pampered than was ever the norm in the workplace – with their demands for time and a tailored approach way out of line with general expectations.

Whilst only 15 percent of employers believe personalised training programs to be necessary, over a third of Millennials rank this as one of the most important factors in retention. In fact, 53 percent of millennials have been disappointed by the lack of a properly implemented personal development plan or training program when starting a new job.

The demand of senior managements time is further exasperated by an overwhelming 91 percent of Millennials who would like to receive formal feedback at least every six months, with 60 percent stating that they would like this as often as every one to three months.

4. Experience

Given that Millennials have the most formal education of any generation in history, being likely to hold at least a bachelors degree already, the chance to earn qualifications on the job is their lowest priority – unlike fellow colleagues from older generations.

When asked what they believed employers value most in potential workers, 59 percent of Millennials gave personality fit with the team or company culture as a top priority. In contrast, 53 percent of employers felt that hard technical skills were highly important in potential employees.

5. International aspirations

Over half (52 percent) of Millennials said that the opportunity to develop their career abroad was important to them, compared to less than a third (31 percent) of Generation X and 15 percent of Boomers.

Chris states: “One of the side effects of growing up in the digital age is that Millennials often see themselves as ‘citizens of the world’, having grown up in an environment where access to the internet means that geographical boundaries are far less important than they had been in the past.

What do Millennials expect from their employer?

1. Salary

A competitive salary was rated important by all generations, but particularly for ambitious Millennials where salary is largely seen as a reflection of their status and success. In fact, 96n percent of Millennials rated a competitive pay and bonus system as important, and 25 percent stated that this would be the number one reason they would change jobs.

Chris said: “It’s important to note that during the downturn, over half (53 percent) of Millennials took a job with a lower salary than expected. As such, employers should be mindful that this may be a contributing factor as to why salary and remuneration are so important to Millennials.

“It also means that as we move out of economic uncertainty they will expect their salaries to catch up to their expectations.”

2. Progression

Millennials want more than just a job – they want a career, with 69 percent citing a clear path for progression in the business as the most important factor in keeping them engaged.

Chris said: “It is perhaps unsurprising that for Millennials at the outset of their careers, a clear path to progression is the most effective motivator. However, this reflects not just the youth but also the ambition of this generation. Millennials have grown up being told they are capable of achieving anything and this confidence means that they crave responsibility early in their careers.”

In fact, 54 percent of Millennials state that having the opportunity to ‘exercise influence’ in the workplace is a key way to keep them engaged and remain with their current employer.

3. Transparency

Millennials do not shy away from responsibility, and they want to know what needs to be done to earn it. Of all generations surveyed, Millennials placed the highest value on transparency over how they could achieve progress in their career.

Seventy-one percent of Millennials strongly agreed that their employer should provide clear guidelines over earning bonuses or promotions. However, 40 percent of employers do not currently do this.

4. Fulfilment

During the recession many Millennials struggled to find jobs that met their expectations. Thirty-one percent reported that they had taken work in a sector that they did not wish to work in. Now, as the economic outlook improves, many are ready to change jobs to find a new role that better suits their ambitions.

Chris advises: “Employers looking to retain Millennial employees should consider giving them the option to move around the business to find a position that better suits their desired career path, particularly given that 70 percent of Millennials consider job rotation within the business one of the most important aspects of their job.”


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 13, 2019
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3min642

Analysis of the UK’s top 250 retailers has found a 19 percent year-on-year increase in the number of brands offering the option to pay in international currency.

The figure forms part of an annual performance index carried out by leading ecommerce and digital agency Visualsoft.

The report examined the sector’s biggest names and found that 81 percent of these retailers are offering customers the option to pay in non-sterling alternatives. This was an increase on the 62 percent of retailers that offered international payments in 2017. The majority of these are Euros and USD, with one percent of retailers offering Yen.

The increase is likely to be a reaction to Brexit-related uncertainty in the lead-up to 29th March.

The research also found that the prevalence of innovative payment methods is increasing. For example, after only being in the market for little over a year, Amazon Pay is already being used by 10 percent of top retailers – showing clear movement towards a more diverse spectrum of payments offered.

A further one-in-10 of retailers analysed offer finance products from lenders such as Klarna – up from almost nothing in 2017. Research has found that around three-quarters (78 percent) of consumers would consider purchasing through retail finance, with the average spend of £620, so offering this type of payment could prove a fundamental avenue for future growth.

However, this appeared to be having a detrimental impact on basic payment methods. A quarter (23 percent) fail to offer a payment choice other than a mainstream credit or debit card. This has worsened by four percent year-on-year.

Dale Higginbottom, head of CRO at Visualsoft, said: “These figures suggest proactivity in the lead-up to Brexit and adoption of new payment trends, which is great to see. However, we know that up to a quarter of consumers also abandon their transactions at checkout because the retailer doesn’t provide their payment method of choice.

“Offering a wide range of options is an important way for retailers to maximise their sales potential, but too many are still not doing so – with 23 percent neglecting an offer outside of traditional cards. This inability to get the basics right could prove crucial as we move into 2019.”


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 8, 2019
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5min706

The Customer Experience Professional Masterclass led by international CX consultant and author Ian Golding, is going from strength-to-strength in 2019 with more satisfied participants than ever.

The two-day class – which is followed by an opportunity to take the CCXP exam following a preparation workshop – sees participants learn the skills and knowledge needed to move a business towards full customer-centricity.

Featuring interactivity, discussions, case studies, and more, Ian, author of Customer What? The honest and practical guide to customer experience, is helping shape the CX landscape in the UK and beyond, empowering a new generation of professionals ready to put customer centricity at the heart of their organisations.

The recent February CX Masterclass was a huge success, and saw eager participants arrive in Stevenage from across the UK – and further afield – to engage.

Speaking of his experience, Ben Washburn, a CX Manager with legal software firm Hyperlaw, said: “I had a fantastic few days at the CX Masterclass. Customer Experience is such a crucial area of business that often doesn’t get the attention it deserves. If deployed properly, it is key to any successful business.

“A huge thank you to Ian for the eye opening insight and all the other attendees for a thoroughly enjoyable two days.”

Mary Geoghegan, a Senior Global Customer Service Leader with the national College of Ireland, said: “I was very impressed with Ian’s delivery of training, his passion, and his support to go above and beyond with his mentoring. Having completed the class I feel re-energised, re-focused, and totally positive that this is the area of business I want to be in and one in which I can make a difference.”

Customer Experience Leader with Bupa Global, Dean Arcan, flew in from Copenhagen to take part and was thrilled to learn from Ian, who also applies his knowledge in judging panels for various CX awards events such as the UK Customer Experience Awards.

“Ian is one of the most inspirational leaders I’ve ever met,” he said.

“He is extremely knowledgeable, passionate, and humble. He is a true example of a leader with purpose and integrity, who is committed to adding value to people.

I feel as though this Masterclass has been a milestone event in my career. I’ve learned so much I’m almost bursting with enthusiasm – even more than usual!

“Under Ian’s guidance I know I will be able to channel this a lot more effectively going forward. Keep doing what you are doing Ian, you are changing lives!”

Meanwhile, Sophie Rugg, a Customer Insight specialist with Wakefield and District Housing, described the Masterclass as “hands down the best training I have ever attended.”

She continued: “Ian is an absolute CX expert and delivers the class with clarity and an infectious enthusiasm. He has an incredible knack for dealing with complex topics with simplicity. I have come away from the class glowing and buzzing with new ideas. I can’t recommend tit highly enough.”

The next CX Professional Masterclass will take place at the Business & Technology Centre in Stevenage on April 23-24, with the CCXP Exam Workshop on the 25th. Click here to register.

For all Masterclass queries, please contact Antonija at antonija@cxm.co.uk.

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 7, 2019
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5min642

CXM has partnered with the Customer & User Experience Expo, which is making its debut at the London ExCeL on the 27th & 28th March 2019, and is running alongside four other unique industry shows at Europe’s best marketing event.

The event will equip you with the tools, techniques, and systems to revolutionise your Customer Experience, pathing your journey to success.

Over 100 experts will be on hand to enlighten visitors with the very best Customer and User Experience guidance available, while an array of the industry’s biggest brands and most innovative suppliers will be showcasing the solutions shaping the future of CX and UX, all under one roof.

Among these industry professionals are the best-of-the-best to advise, educate, and influence the development of your CX plan for your business.

Keynote speakers include:

Daniel Ord – Founder of OmniTouch International

Daniel will share multiple examples from his work on Contact Centre Mystery Shopper programs, to highlight that it may be time to reinvent your approach to quality. He will also provide practical suggestions for doing so.

Nikki Patel – Head of Evaluation for Digital Development at NHS England

This presentation will take a look at developments in digital technology in the NHS and the direction of travel for the future, to ensure new opportunities can be grasped and citizen experience improved.

Nick Iron – Lead UX Designer at John Lewis

In this talk, Nick will use principles of heuristic traps in skiing and mountaineering to illustrate some of the mistakes that are commonly made in UX and UI design, and demonstrate how, whilst rarely fatal, they can be highly damaging to our careers or business success.

For all this and more, the 2019 free ticket for the Customer & User Experience Expo will also give you unprecedented access to the Call & Contact Centre Expo, B2B Marketing Expo, Marketing Technology Expo, and Sales Innovation Expo; with a combined lineup of 1,000 cutting-edge exhibitors, 500 educational seminars, and 200 interactive masterclasses, this is going to be a show like no other.

Visit the website today to secure your limited FREE ticket.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 5, 2019
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3min561

Customer Experience professionals are preparing to gather in Dublin for the 2019 European Insight Exchange event.

Taking place in the Irish capital on March 13-14 at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, the conference is hosted by the CXPA and is one of Europe’s premier events for sharing best practise and highlighting skills in Customer Experience.

A fantastic networking opportunity, the European Insight Exchange features workshops, a thought leader panel, and unique ‘Show & Tell’ sessions with professionals revealing inspiring details of successful CX initiatives that you can adapt for your own organisation.

Also taking place will be ‘Unwound Sharing’ forum sessions that bring attendees together for brainstorming and to receive valuable feedback on ideas. Topics covered here will include: Implementing Customer Focused Change; Going Beyond Surveys – Other Methods for Gathering Perceptions and Insights; Aligning Culture, CX and EX; Developing an Experience-Centric Culture; Measuring Customer Emotion; and Articulating the Value of CX.

The event – the theme of which this year is ‘Where is the Human in CX? – will also provide an opportunity to sit the CCXP Exam for attendees who pay the fee by February 13.

A spokesperson for the event said: “CXPA Members designed their annual Insight Exchange events to be like no other conference. These events offered in both Europe and the United States are planned, organised and executed by member volunteers just like you.

“These events are meant to be intimate gatherings with opportunities for fearless sharing and chances to learn from people who are walking in your shoes. Whether or not you’re a member of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA), and no matter where you are on your CX journey, the 2019 European Insight Exchange is the perfect opportunity to expand your network and your knowledge with more than 150 Customer Experience professionals.”

Two additional free workshops with a value of €1,000 are also included for those who register. To find out more about registering for the event, click here.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 28, 2019
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3min590

Mark Seemann is a UK tech pioneer and telecommunications trailblazer who is now CEO of StaffCircle, a firm providing a work platform that improves internal communication and feedback for employees.

StaffCircle digitises sentiment, awards, communication, training, ideas, tasks, holidays, and directory and delivers it to staff via the smartphone in their pocket. This reduces staff attrition and creates greater employee engagement, empowerment, and productivity.

In an interview with CXM, Mark discusses the future of employee engagement, and why that future is the here and now…

Tell us about StaffCircle and what the company does

StaffCircle is an Internal Communications and Performance Management Platform. It is designed for organisations needing to have two-way communications and feedback with their office-based employees and also their non-desk-based digitally disconnected workforce.

As the relevance of the Customer Experience concept rises, how important is Employee Experience in this new era?

It’s crucial! Engaged employees deliver a better service and ultimately, happier customers. Employee Experience spans a number of areas, and one of them is Digital Experience which is why we created StaffCircle – to help companies open up the feedback loop between business leaders and the entire workforce.

What are some common failings of firms when it comes to employee engagement?

Most non-desk employees aren’t digitally connected to their companies. One-way communication prevails usually through email or paper.

Companies lack the systems and capability to deliver a consistent Employee Experience across both desk and non-desk-based employees because current systems are not designed for the modern smartphone-centric workforce. This disconnect can cause disengaged employees and information silos.

What are some simple steps organisations can take towards improving employee engagement?

Listen to your employees using surveys or internal workshops. Companies need to create faster feedback loops, opening up a digital information flow with their employees at scale. Take a look at the new technology now available, such as StaffCircle, to see how companies can engage digitally with employees with a Company Information Feed, One2Ones, Learning, Appraisals, and Polls.

What is the future of the relationship between firms and employees as technology and other factors continue to make an impact on that relationship?

Organisations need to engage in structured two-way communications rather than one-way unstructured comms (eg: email or paper).

Organisations need to listen to their employees using digital tools enabling faster feedback and greater information flow. Millennials use advanced digital technology (smartphone apps) at home and on the go; it’s time organisations mobilised their technology stack and opened it up to all of their employees.

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 25, 2019
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8min477

SDL, a global leader in content creation, translation, and delivery, has outlined six recommendations for companies looking to unlock the strategic power of an intelligent content supply chain in 2019, giving them the ability to engage with anyone, anywhere, in their own language and device of choice.

A November 2018 Forrester Consulting study, Today’s Content Supply Chains Prevent Continuous Customer Journeys, commissioned by SDL, revealed that companies need to develop a Global Content Operating Model (GCOM), a framework that aligns people, technology, and processes across a company, helping them mature the way they create, translate, and deliver content to their customers. This helps brands handle the growing volume and velocity of content required to engage with worldwide audiences.

The study also found that brands rely too heavily on disjointed technologies including a collection Web Content Management Systems, network drives, and document management systems, supported by poorly orchestrated human translation, to build customer experiences on a global scale. Internal organisational silos also add to the complexity involved in providing continuity across the pre-sale, sale, and post-sale phases of the customer journey.

“To reach the desired end state of intelligent content, companies need to build for the future today,” according to the Forrester study. “They need to rethink their current processes, technology, and organisational structures to be prepared for a future where the strategic value of content continues to grow and determines the difference between company success and failure.

Peggy Chen, Chief Marketing Officer at SDL, said: “The result of organisational and technological disconnects is poor, fragmented experiences and frustrated customers. At a time when customers are turning online dozens of times a day, that’s an enormous missed opportunity. By commissioning this study from Forrester Consulting we have uncovered the key problems and developed a set of six recommendations that outline a path for brands to consider in 2019 when evolving their content supply chain.”

1.Take control of your content supply chain

The volume and velocity at which brands create content is out of control, and it’s only going to become more complex. Ninety-three percent of brands say they will produce more content in the next two years. Half estimate the volume of content will increase by more than 30 percent (and a third estimate by more than 40 percent), according to the Forrester Consulting study.

The answer to fixing this is to regain content control across the organisation. The GCOM can help brands achieve this, moving from a manual operating model towards automated and even autonomous for global content creation, translation and delivery.

2. Explore intelligent content platforms

Only about one third of brands believe they provide customers with a continuous customer experience, according to the study. Brands looking to deliver meaningful and consistent customer experiences, across multiple channels and languages, will need vast amounts of content – more than it’s possible for marketing teams to create. Companies will require an intelligent, flexible and AI-driven architecture. Applying intelligence to a content ecosystem will help companies automate tasks, and reduce the cost involved in managing extreme amounts of content.

3. Rethink how content is constructed

The popularity of video, chatbots, virtual assistants, and other emerging channels are on the rise. Brands expect these to significantly grow over the next two years, yet only 29 percent say that they are very satisfied with the ability of their tools to engage with customers across these channels, and deliver a continuous experience, according to the study.

Rethink how content is constructed and shared across teams so that it can be adapted for these new delivery models with minimal rework and maximum impact. This will help brands deliver content faster across different channels, languages, and audiences.

4. Be ready to adapt content for any channel

Customers want content, across multiple channels, at any time of day. Therefore, how do brands create enough content to meet demand? Little more than half of firms have a centralised and standardised toolset for the creation (51 percent), translation (54 percent), and delivery (56 percent) of content across regions and languages. Bringing systems together to increase the delivery of easily consumed content, ensures its consistency across all stages of the buying cycle.

5. Realise that customers want product information

Buyers and users want the details about products and services not just after the deal is done, but during the buying cycle to understand their investments and make more informed decisions. Brands understand this trend. Three-quarters (77 percent) admit that keeping product information relevant and up-to-date is critical to a good Customer Experience.

They also agree that improving access to product information would have the single greatest positive impact on Customer Experience – more so than any other type of content. Brands need to be ready to deliver everything from production manuals, videos, and spec sheets to customers, in their own language and to the highest standards.

6. Leadership should drive change

According to the study, 82 percent of firms agree content is critical to their company’s success in achieving top business objectives. Despite this, three quarters (80 percent) believe that current content supply chain challenges impede their ability to deliver on top business objectives.

The Vice President and C-level executives should be the driving force behind digital change. They have the advantage of seeing cross-departmental, global activities, and may be in a better position to spot broken or redundant processes.

Improved content supply chains lead to robust departmental and business-wide benefits. Companies gain improved productivity, higher customer engagement, increased conversion rates, and increased customer satisfaction, among other benefits.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 25, 2019
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6min542

Professional salaries in the UK will remain relatively flat in 2019, as Britain’s pending departure from the EU impacts employee confidence and business willingness to spend.

The findings come from the annual Salary Survey produced by global recruitment consultancy Robert Walters.

“Uncertainty around Brexit has created a fear of ‘last in first out,’ which in turn has meant that employees are less willing to move roles as swiftly as they would have in previous years,” states Chris Hickey, CEO of the UK, Middle East & Africa at Robert Walters.

“As a result, despite there being high demand for specialist and highly skilled professionals, companies are finding themselves contending with a UK-wide candidate shortage across most disciplines.”

The news will not be met with a warm reception, as almost half (46 percent) of professionals currently believe that companies do not offer a competitive enough salary, according to recent Robert Walters survey.

However, in-spite of Brexit there will be pockets of intense hiring activity and salary increases within banking and financial services – driven by demand for skills such as compliance, risk, and audit.

In fact, salaries in Internal Audit are expected to rise by as much as 20 percent across all levels. For those in the Risk sector, starting salaries (1-3 yrs’ exp) will see a five percent growth, with this increasing at each level to 8-10 percent for those with 7-10 yrs’ exp.

It seems it is a good time to be a professional in the West Midlands, with qualified accountants expecting a 10-20% rise, and HR professionals expecting a 10% rise in salaries this year.

As one of the fastest-growing markets across the whole of the UK – growing at three times the rate of the main economy – tech seems to be the shining light for the North West, in particular in Manchester where IT salaries in the region have increased by 20 percent.

Despite employees becoming risk averse, Robert Walters data shows that it has been ‘business as usual’ for companies, with the number of jobs being advertised remaining unchanged.

“Whilst trade may be consistent, freezes on spending have been commonplace for most companies, making it difficult for hiring managers to lure candidates into job offers without an increase in pay,” said Chris.

“To counter this, businesses have been investing in themselves and their own infrastructure, in order to become a more all-round appealing place to work.”

According to Robert Walters research, 75 percent of Millennials consider an engaging and fun workplace an important part of their job.

Chris added: “It will continue to be a competitive market in 2019 and so in order to attract top talent and high-performing millennials, companies should invest in their employer brand and improve softer benefits including flexi-hours and the workplace environment.”

Career progression (91 percent), brand personality & cultural fit (58 percent), rate at which company adopts new technologies (42 percent), a sociable team culture (30 percent), and job satisfaction (25 percent) are considered the most valuable to the Millennial workforce – outside of pay.

“Our advice to businesses facing candidate shortages is to be flexible and consider hiring professionals with transferrable skills. Companies should consider taking on candidates who are ambitious and fast learners, even if they are not an exact fit for the job description, in order to support areas of growth within the business,” said Chris.

A number of companies have already started to gear up for a post-Brexit market by setting up offices in major cities within Belgium, France, Germany, and Luxembourg.

Chris said: “The UK still offers some of the most competitive salaries in Europe, however it will not surprise me to see more and more professionals move to other European countries who are known for their work-life balance and lifestyle.

“It is crucial now more than ever that employers focus on retention and maintaining headcount – variety in the job role, cross-training, secondments and lateral moves will all help retention rates with less cost to businesses when compared to introducing pay increases.”




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