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10min1893

Customer Experience is a global movement – across the world, an increasing number of companies are understanding the business case for focusing on the customer, and are seeking the right tools to achieve this goal.

Some countries have, however, reached a greater level of CX maturity than others. The roots of CX culture run deepest in the United States, where organisations such as Amazon have set a global standard in customer centricity.

In fact, an Ipsos + Medallia study indicated that 19 percent of US customers feel their expectations were exceeded in online retail experiences, compared to just nine percent of UK customers.

While there remains considerable variation among sectors – only 11 percent of American customers feel similarly positive about their offline retail encounters – there is also a striking difference in CX perception among countries.

             

 

In Germany, relatively few online retail customers say their expectations were exceeded – eight percent compared to 19 percent in the US.

Customer Experience in the UK lies somewhere between these two extremes; more sophisticated than in Germany, but not yet at the level of the US. Some UK sectors, such as the hotel industry, perform particularly well, with 21 percent of customers saying their expectations were exceeded. Yet the overall average across sectors is under 10 percent – well behind the US figure of 17.3 percent.

So the UK is getting there with Customer Experience, but it’s far from consistent and there is still significant progress to be made. The question at this stage is: what can UK companies do to take Customer Experience to the next level and establish themselves as the uncontested CX leaders of Europe?

1. Be smart about your surveys

There is a tricky balance to strike in Customer Experience: you want to know as much as possible about your customers, but they don’t want to spend all afternoon answering your surveys. Fortunately, a limited number of open-ended questions will typically get your customers sharing their most pressing concerns.

This is why it’s so important to get surveys right. The best time for your customers to answer questions is in the moment, when memories of the interaction are still fresh and likely to elicit the most accurate responses.

A great way of capturing these fresh opinions is by embedding surveys throughout your customer journey. These provide more granular responses than general end-of-transaction emails, and they’re a great addition to your CX toolkit.

It’s now possible to embed surveys at highly specific stages of the journey, such as when customers are watching media-heavy content or reading product pages and descriptions. You can decide which approach is best for the specific needs of your business.

2. Use real-time text analytics

Qualitative feedback is essential for gaining a more nuanced understanding of customer issues. Many companies in the UK still employ large teams of people to sift through this feedback, looking for trends, but the truth is that technology can enable your staff to make smarter, data-based decisions while saving valuable time.

For example, text analytics can identify the tone of written responses using artificial intelligence, automatically sorting them into clusters and enabling you to identify and prioritise the most important areas going forward.

This enables your team to operate at a higher level, interpreting the findings from your text analytics and putting them to good use.

3. Bring Customer Experience into instant messaging

Capturing feedback at the right time, and on the right channel, is vital. However, instant messaging integration isn’t just about feedback – you can also include targeted features that your customer will really appreciate, such as holiday or entertainment recommendations.

Using platforms like WhatsApp or Messenger also enables customers to share a wider range of media by uploading videos or sending photos while having a more convenient and frictionless feedback experience.

4. Integrate with voice technology

Abound 10 million Brits use a smart speaker, and that number is expected to grow by a third in 2019. Since this is an increasingly significant touchpoint, it’s important to measure precisely what customers think.

It is now possible to integrate surveys with Alexa and other web-connected devices through solutions such as Medallia’s Digital Anywhere.

When you combine these insights with data about how your customers interact with IoT (Internet of Things) devices, you can get a clear picture of their priorities across the whole customer journey. It’s also important to remember that Customer Experience expectations continue to rise. If your CX innovations don’t keep up with consumer trends, how do you expect to retain customers?

5. Do more to personalise

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to Customer Experience. Customers will respond differently depending on the circumstance. Being sensitive to these nuances is crucial for anyone working in CX. For instance, if a passenger’s flight has just been cancelled, that may not be the best time to ask for feedback: it will most likely serve to irritate them.

The more advanced the technology you have informing your CX strategy, the more you will be able to personalise and deliver outstanding experiences.

6. Incorporate artificial intelligence platforms

The potential for this goes far beyond text analytics, and we’re now seeing revolutionary new products using AI to optimise Customer Experience. AI-driven CX solutions can deliver targeted, precise insights about every touchpoint in your customer journey.

Beyond helping you understand qualitative feedback, these types of advanced solutions automatically assess your survey responses and can help you predict the impact of changes to your CX strategy.

What next for the UK?

Although a European leader, there remains a significant CX gap between the UK and the US. It’s only by harnessing world-beating technology that Britain will be able to deliver experiences to that same high standard.

Whether it’s collecting feedback in a smarter, less intrusive way, or using artificial intelligence to inform decisions, truly embracing the digital revolution and adopting more advanced CX capabilities is the best way to enhance Customer Experience.

 

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 18, 2019
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4min787

The future of marketing is personal!

As the expectations of your customer skyrocket, and the relationships they forge with their brands grow looser, it can be challenging to continually inspire loyalty while also driving growth. With so many companies now vying for the attention of your audience, it’s now imperative to stand out from the crowd and deliver not just punchy, but personalised and thoughtful, marketing.

“Understanding the customer journey is the single most important factor in delivering personalised interactions,” according to Michal Szaniecki, Managing Director of SEAT and Cupra at Volkswagen.

At this year’s Brand Marketing Summit Europe, we will be taking a deeper look at how to elevate your marketing; check out the full speaker line up here.

To truly understand your customer’s journey and inspire loyalty, you need to first get to grips with what your customer wants. Leveraging data from across your different channels and placing this at the forefront of your marketing strategy can guarantee that customers receive the right content, communications, and offers at the right time.  

“The customer journey is crucial and the foundation for the approach towards (future) clients. The ‘traditional’ push campaign and (cold) calling initiatives are diminishing in relevance fast.”

This is the opinion of speaker Arjen Vissers, who is the Managing Director of marketing and comms at financial giant AON. Furthermore, a brand such as Harrods – with a versatile clientele – builds up a picture of who their customer is, what they buy, and when they buy it, to directly impact the products they then recommend and also what other areas of the Harrods portfolio of products they might be interested in browsing.

Download the brochure for 2019’s most important gathering of marketing leaders.

On the other end of the spectrum, Burger King have become renowned for their witty and mould-breaking marketing campaigns, which rely heavily on external agencies to help ensure freshness in their work. From cheeky geofencing of McDonald’s restaurants, through to creative adverts like the Andy Warhol piece, the emphasis is solely on standing out from the crowd and inspiring loyalty with a clear brand purpose.

This shift towards standing out from their competitors has shown clear results for company growth and will harvest attention and positive consumer thoughts.

At this year’s Brand Marketing Summit Europe (25th-26th June, London) we are bringing together strategic decision makers from the brands mentioned above and over 120 more to form a movement of marketers seeking out the way forward.

The future of marketing is personal and we now have, if we’re lucky, one chance to impress our customer. Join us this summer to hear from the most important brands in the marketing space and revolutionise your own marketing in the process!

Download your brochure here for the full range of insights.

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 18, 2019
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5min1293

Customer service has always been a critical tenet of any business model, and the internet is beginning to take centre stage in terms of exposure alongside revenue generation.

However, the entire concept of client relations is changing at what can only be called a breakneck pace. This is partially due to the increased level of online competition. Visitors who feel that their needs are not being catered to will simply look elsewhere in order to procure quality products or services.

This is why the concept of engagement needs to be taken very seriously. What changes are taking place and why is it critical to choose the best ecommerce platform for your organisation?

The demanding nature of the Millennial generation

Millennials now represent a significant demographic, and their numbers continue to grow. Coincidentally, this population segment also tends to be the most fickle and challenging in terms of securing a sale (and for good reason). They are well aware of the technology at their disposal. No longer is a visitor willing to wait 20 or 30 seconds for a page to load. In the event of a question or problem, they expect relevant and helpful answers. So, there is little room for error.

In the past, the majority of customer service solutions involved nothing more than a generic page addressing the most frequently asked questions. This is no longer sufficient due to the ‘organic’ nature of the buyer-seller relationship. The needs of the individual should be addressed as opposed to presenting blanket support in the hopes that it will remain sufficient. There are several ways in which this can be accomplished:

 

  • Real-time chat windows with a live representative
  • Dedicated email addresses for different topics (such as sales issues or technical faults)
  • Social media profiles to enhance real-time interactions


The main issue is that these solutions can be difficult to implement for those who lack the time or the financial flexibility. This is why adopting robust e-commerce solutions is essential.

Targeted and agile e-commerce solutions

E-commerce software was previously defined as architecture meant to expedite the sales process. While this is still relevant, many flexible solutions such as those engineered by Shopify have taken a broader approach to the entire concept.

No longer are these applications limited to online transactions alone. They now provide an all-around means to interact with customers and to present products in an eye-catching manner. In other words, they are intended to streamline the entire notion of client engagement. This is also why e-commerce bundles are absolutely essential in this day and age.

The truth of the matter is that nothing can replace a quality product or service. Still, what takes place ‘behind the scenes’ in regards to customer engagement is now extremely important. Businesses which are able to embrace this decidedly human touch are bound to enjoy sustainable success in the future. There is no better time than the present to implement these techniques in order to meet and exceed the expectations of an online audience.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 10, 2019
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1min1541

Ian Golding is a world-renowned Customer Experience consultant, and author of the most influential CX book available today, Customer What?: An honest and practical guide to customer experience

In this interview, Ian – who also leads the CX Professional Masterclass and CCXP Exam Workshop – outlines the work of CX professionals, how companies test their CX offering, how organisations can change and improve to become more customer-centric, and more…


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 10, 2019
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1min1402

The International Customer Experience Awards is returning to Amsterdam in 2019 following an inaugural event that brought together some of the biggest names in global CX, and the very best customer-centric organisations from around the world.

Entries for the event are now open, with a special Early Bird offer available for those who register before June 12th. Finalists for the event, which is hosted by Awards International UAE & Netherlands, will be announced in August, with the gala ceremony taking place on November 21st.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 10, 2019
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1min1098

The Gulf Customer Experience Awards, hosted by Awards International UAE, is the biggest celebration of CX in the Middle East and beyond, with the next awards finals taking place in Dubai next January.

As Customer Experience continues to be the key differentiator for competitive brands, leaving product and price in its wake, these awards recognise and celebrate the businesses and organisations which are truly placing customers at the very heart of what they do.

Click here to register your interest for the next awards in 2020.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 9, 2019
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6min675

Do you want to grow your business? Well, if your answer is yes, then you need to understand a simple rule: most products are just commodities for users.

If the product addresses the issue of the customers, then two different companies offer the same value to the customers.

You have to understand that the key to getting a sale is to offer the best Customer Experience. The benefit of this practice is that it will help to increase the revenue of your company. Plus, you will be able to add profit to your business.

The essential aspect is that you need to audit the various customer experiences within the business. As a result, you will be able to improve the way your business interacts with the customers.

The audit will also offer insight into your vendors and inventory. The best approach is to hire professional help to conduct retail audits for you. For example, you can seek the assistance of the brand name in retail audits that is Assosia.

However, it is essential that you understand what retail audits are all about, and the different aspects that get judged.

The Aspect of Brand Awareness

The essential aspect of judging is what the customers think of your brand. The brand is a crucial aspect that separates your company from its competitors. What you need to keep in mind is that the brand sets the expectations even before the customer steps into your store.

You need to audit this aspect. For this, you will need to survey the current customers. Secondly, you need to put some questions to the customers. For example, what they think of your company, and they should give this answer in one word.

Evaluation of the Shopping Experience

The shopping experience is yet another aspect that gets judged in retail audits. Some customers prefer to shop in-store rather than online because they feel that they get good advice from the staff. However, you will need to provide relevant training to your staff in this regard. They should be able to empower the customers to make decisions.

If you want your retail audit to bring up positive feedback, then it is vital that as a business owner you should work with your staff for some time. The advantage is that you will get an idea about the floor operations and how the staff deals with the customers.

When you want to audit the shopping experience, observe when customers enter the store. Look at what the customers buy. You may get hold of some mystery shoppers as well and get their opinion on the shopping experience by making them fill forms.

Look into the Return Policy

The return policy is yet another crucial aspect that gets judged in retail audits. Many of the retailers are reluctant to provide a return policy for all those products that cannot get resold with ease. As a business owner, you need to fight this reluctance and show confidence in your products.

You should review the customer complaints on a positive note. When you know the complaints, you will have a chance to bring about improvements in your products, and convince the unhappy customer to become a loyal customer.

For retail audits, the first thing you need to know is to analyse the return rate and look at the reasons due to which the products come back. It is also important that you should calculate the LTV of the customers from time to time.

Remember these essential aspects if you plan to have a retail audit conducted soon.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 2, 2019
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3min760

Nearly two-thirds of Millennial and Gen Z consumers express a preference for brands that have a point of view and stand for something.

As customers demand a more personalised and meaningful relationship with the brands of their choice, it is imperative you have a clear brand purpose, and if not, you reinvent your strategy.

Brands such as Burger King and Millennium Hotels and Resorts will discuss how they ensure their marketing messages hit the right note with their audience and ensure they stay ahead of the curve during Incite Groups free webinar, 14:00 GMT 3rd April.

Marketing leaders contributing include:

  • Franck Kermarrec, Chief Marketing Officer, Millennium Hotels and Resorts
  • Andrea D’Aloia, Brand Director EMEA, Burger King
  • Ben Roberts, Digital Marketing Strategist and moderator of Marketing Buzzword Podcast 

Hear how these brand leaders are:

  • Strategically reinventing their brand purpose
  • Positioning themselves in an increasingly congested ecosystem and standing out from the crowd
  • Moving beyond traditional marketing and what this means for you

(FYI – if you can’t join live, we will send you the recordings if you register).

The Incite Group – a business intelligence company devoted to helping large corporations serve their customers better – is part of FC Business Intelligence Ltd, a registered company in England and Wales – Registered number 0438897. 7-9 Fashion Street, London, E1 6PX, UK.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 11, 2019
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5min1393

For any product or service, a good Customer Experience is essential.

We see this in video games, casino, and bingo games. They are designed to ensure that the player will have a great time, remember the game, and as a result, have that desire to play again. These basic design factors are included in many traditional games, and have been kept in their online and mobile versions.

The perfect example is mFortune and their games like bingo. Consequently, there are many lessons that can be learned from gaming and how the Customer Experience continues to engage and maintain the interest of the player.

Good first impressions

New games are often available to download for free, whether it is a demo or a game that will have content to purchase within the application. Studies suggest that a quarter of games are only installed once, meaning that it is crucial that the developers create a good impression to ensure that the game doesn’t get deleted.

To do this, it is important that loading times are limited, advertising isn’t over the top, and the game must be easy to understand and have a good interface. If a game goes against any of these, the player is likely to be very frustrated and is likely to delete the game and not recommend it to family and friends.

Feedback

One thing you will notice when a new game is installed and played for a short amount of time is that you will be asked to rate the game and add your comments. This ties into first impressions, as the game developers and/or operator want the player to be immediately engaged, and want to know whether or not this is happening.

Negative comments can help the developers identify bugs within the games and quickly fix them for a new release. Many developers will release beta versions of a game and hire players specifically to test them to find and report any problems. This is a very useful Customer Experience lesson – embrace feedback, and if there is a problem, fix it quickly or your customers will go away.

Promotion

The established gaming franchises, such as Grand Theft Auto and Call of Duty, start the Customer Experience with their promotion, sometimes years before the game is released. Trailers with sneak previews are shown to gather interest amongst the die-hard fans. This is an example of how brands look to keep their existing customers engaged, and it is proved very successful when some gaming trailers get up to 50 million views on YouTube over a year before the release of the game.

Another way of keeping existing customers interested is by offering additional content and rewards if the game is pre-ordered. Here we see how the gaming industry successfully uses promotion techniques to keep their loyal players engaged.

There we have it – the gaming industry is a great example of how the Customer Experience is designed to be perfect and to ensure customers remain loyal and engaged. Businesses can learn a lot about how the Customer Experience is a constant ongoing theme, from promotion, right through to release and obtaining feedback.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 8, 2019
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3min771

The average UK consumer spends £41 more than the original value of their gift card, according to a new study.

The UK Prepaid Consumer Insights Study released by First Data found that 34 percent of consumers visit a store they would not have visited otherwise due to their receipt of a gift card.

Researchers looked at trends in branded currency, giving business owners insight into how gift cards can benefit and grow their businesses. This year’s study was based on survey data from more than 1,000 UK consumers and aggregated responses across four unique age groups: Generation Z (ages 18-23), Millennials (ages 24-37), Generation X/Y (ages 38-53), and Boomers (age 54+).

John Gibbons, Executive Vice President, Head of EMEA & Co-Head of Global Financial Solutions at First Data, said: “Our study shows a distinct opportunity for UK business owners to drive more sales, strengthen their brand, and bolster customer loyalty by implementing smart branded currency strategies.

“From employee rewards and customer service programs to social media promotions and targeted marketing campaigns, both physical and digital gift cards offer valuable incentives to both businesses and consumers.”

The study results showed increased interest for digital currency and a growth trajectory that is expected to continue. It found that 55 percent of consumers purchased plastic gift cards, while 45 percent of consumers purchased digital gift cards in 2018. While a majority of purchasers still prefer plastic, consumers are accelerating their use of digital cards largely due to convenience – as these can be sent instantly and are easier to reload.

Last year, UK consumers spent on average £203 or 38 percent of their annual gifting budget on gift cards; and while 81 percent of consumers surveyed purchased a gift card as a present for an occasion or event, one-in-three respondents spent more on a gift card than a traditional gift.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 7, 2019
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9min875

It’s no news that satisfied employees are one of the pillars of a successful company, but what makes an employee happy and motivated?

How do we know which processes are working well and which ones are criticised? What are the attractive factors of a workplace and what are the sources of conflict between team members? The answers to these questions can be easily found out by a suitable employee satisfaction survey and the responses can be evaluated within minutes with tools  like automated text analyzer systems. Here is an example, showing the whole process from data collection to the application of results.

To collect employee feedback quickly is a big challenge for most companies without the suitable tools, let alone the next part – the data evaluation and identification of the matching points of hundreds of responses.

However, nowadays there is no need for HR professionals to do the work manually, spending long hours with it. There are tools that cut down the evaluation time and effort, while the accuracy of the results are also better.

In this case study by media monitoring firm Neticle, we see how employee feedback can be processed quickly and easily, and how it can be used as an input for organisational development processes.

Methodology

Neticle used their own text analyser tool to uncover the opinion of every co-worker in detail about the most important factors:

  • atmosphere in the office
  • organisational structure
  • progress of the company (in business and in technological terms)
  • internal communication
  • the rights for decision-making
  • working hours
  • salary
  • tasks
  • the management

To let team members describe their opinion as accurate as possible, open-ended ones were included in the survey alongside multiple-choice questions.

To process the results, Neticle used Zurvey, an automated text analyser tool which identifies the tone of every text-based opinion as positive, negative, or neutral based on the phrases that occur in the text.

It also recognises topics, brands, locations, and persons in the text. Therefore, there was no need to analyse the survey responses manually and subjectively. The strongest and weakest points of Employee Experience within the organisation could be found out within a matter of minutes.

Results

Malfunctions in the operational processes – negative topics

The text analyser identified three critical points regarding the operation. The most frequently mentioned one was the office, indicating that that co-workers do not respect the common places in the office: they often leave dirty dishes in the kitchen, make too much noise, and speak loudly. Moreover, many complaints have been written about the office becoming “too small” for the fast-growing team.

The second pain point appeared to be the organisational structure. Many proposed the revision of the management processes and suggested that weekly status meetings could be more structured and time-saving if attended by relevant team members only.   

The other request was to have middle management. Given that Neticle is a startup with a non-hierarchical organisation structure, there is no-one between the C-level executives and other members of the team. As the survey showed, many began to feel the necessity of managers, who could coordinate within and across teams more clearly.

Besides the above, Neticle employees need more accurate briefs. As many people from different teams work on the same projects, the tasks are often fragmented and it is difficult to detect who’s in charge.

The well-functioning processes – positive topics

The average score for the question how employees like working at Neticle was 9.25 out of 10. Employees highlighted the importance of an assembled but open team where lots of friendships have been made and outdoor activities have been organised together. Because of this friendly atmosphere, employees start working happily, even on Monday mornings.

Effect came as second best, indicating that employees love being involved in important decisions because of the flat and democratic structure. This not only means that members are asked and informed about important changes, but they are also free to work from home flexibly and can turn to anyone in the team for help. The team also find it inspiring to work for a successful company where they can see the fruits of daily hard work through constant growing.

Application of the results: some examples

The honest responses made valuable insights for the process of development and helped the firm discover which areas are satisfying and which ones need improvement. Results were shared with the whole team as part of  transparent internal communication habits and solutions for the problems were discussed.

The survey data can be further used in external communication processes too. For example, the positive aspects can support the employer’s brand and attractive features can be highlighted in job advertisements also. Shared opinions of team members increase the authenticity and uniqueness of job posts, while it also can increase the number of applicants.

With a clear view of the weaknesses, companies can look for solutions, considering the workers’ suggestions. Identifying problematic areas will save time and make a HR team’s work more efficient and successful in creating an excellent Employee Experience within a company. 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 1, 2019
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5min987

While Japan may have the world’s highest debt to GDP ratio of 223.8 percent, the UK has also seen this number rise exponentially in the last 25 years.

Estimated at just 29% during the first quarter of 1993, this peaked at 87.2 percent as 2017 drew to a close.

As the UK’s national debt has soared, household liabilities have also increased across the board. We’ll explore this below by analysing a debt map of the UK and reviewing the most indebted areas of the country.

The north and south divide

At the end of 2016, the average consumer debt per person in the UK stood at £603, while this year also saw unsecured credit levels break the £200 billion barrier.

However, there’s a clear geographical divide when it comes to consumer debt in the UK, with only two postcode areas north of the Midlands being among the most indebted in the country. Warrington and Crewe had a consumer credit of £728 per capita at the end of 2016, with households in these regions continuing to struggle with mounting household debts.

At least seven postcode areas in the south featured among the nation’s most indebted regions, with East London topping this list with a per capita debt of £756. Northampton followed at £749, with Salisbury trailing close behind at £739.

The bustling town of Milton Keynes also saw its per capita debt peak at £708, joining Dartford, Redford, Reading and Slough in breaking the £700 barrier.

Other regions in the south and south-east also had a per capita value of consumer credit that was significantly higher than the national average. These included Swindon and Stevenage, each of which had a per capita debt of £681 at the end of 2016.

Conversely, the majority of northern postcodes boasted a per-capita debt that was slightly or significantly lower than the national average, with Lerwick and Bradford leading the list at £446 and £450 respectively.

The last word

With regions in the south and south east boasting the highest levels of per capital debt in the UK, it’s clear that there’s a geographic divide when it comes to consumer spending and borrowing.

The relationship between real wage growth and the cost of living is central to this trend. Earnings have generally stagnated across the board during the last decade, while the cost of living has risen, meaning that people often need a little extra help with their financial situation.

This trend was bucked at the end of last year, however, with wage growth rising by 3.2% following an incremental increase in October. This, coupled with the fact that inflation dropped to 2.1% in December of 2018, may help households to reduce their debt levels incrementally in the near-term.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 20, 2019
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10min1181

Millennials have been dubbed the most ‘impatient generation’ in the workplace, with over 90 percent wanting ‘rapid career progression’.

Almost 70 percent of employers believe that this level of ambition and desire is the leading cause of conflict between generations – with a third of Generation X (34 percent) and a quarter of Baby Boomers (24 percent) and Millennials (24 percent) agreeing with this.

The findings come from a Robert Walters whitepaper, which surveyed over 2,000 respondents to find out what it takes to retain millennial professionals.

Chirs Hickey, UK CEO at Robert Walters, said: “According to our survey, almost 60 percent of workers have experienced intergenerational conflict in the workplace. As Millennials make up a growing part of the workforce, finding a way for members of different generations to work together effectively is an increasingly high priority.

“Making sure that managers understand what motivates workers from different generations, how they like to communicate, and identifying common sources of conflict is essential to creating a strong team of varied generations and diversity of opinions.”

Sources of inter-generational conflict in the workplace

1.Workplace culture

According to the Robert Walters report, three quarters of professionals (73 percent) have left a job because of poor company culture. Over half of Millennials reported that poor company culture was a source of disappointment in a new job, with 90 percent claiming that they research the culture in advance of taking an opportunity.

Whilst a third of Millennials felt that meeting their colleagues in a social setting was important, this contrasts with just 15 percent of Generation X and less than one percent of Boomers who value social outings with colleagues.

2. Technology

Millennials widely perceive technology to be at the root of workplace conflicts. Thirty-four percent reported that older workers not understanding new technology was the chief cause of these conflicts, followed by younger workers becoming frustrated at using outdated technology (33 percent).

Millennial professionals are also distinct from their older colleagues in their attitudes towards  social media. Almost 40 percent of Millennials felt that employers should actively encourage workers to incorporate social media into their work, compared to less than a quarter (24 percent) of Generation X and just 10 percent of Baby Boomers.

3. Tailored approach

Employers and employees from Generation X and Baby Boomers believe that Millennials are far more pampered than was ever the norm in the workplace – with their demands for time and a tailored approach way out of line with general expectations.

Whilst only 15 percent of employers believe personalised training programs to be necessary, over a third of Millennials rank this as one of the most important factors in retention. In fact, 53 percent of millennials have been disappointed by the lack of a properly implemented personal development plan or training program when starting a new job.

The demand of senior managements time is further exasperated by an overwhelming 91 percent of Millennials who would like to receive formal feedback at least every six months, with 60 percent stating that they would like this as often as every one to three months.

4. Experience

Given that Millennials have the most formal education of any generation in history, being likely to hold at least a bachelors degree already, the chance to earn qualifications on the job is their lowest priority – unlike fellow colleagues from older generations.

When asked what they believed employers value most in potential workers, 59 percent of Millennials gave personality fit with the team or company culture as a top priority. In contrast, 53 percent of employers felt that hard technical skills were highly important in potential employees.

5. International aspirations

Over half (52 percent) of Millennials said that the opportunity to develop their career abroad was important to them, compared to less than a third (31 percent) of Generation X and 15 percent of Boomers.

Chris states: “One of the side effects of growing up in the digital age is that Millennials often see themselves as ‘citizens of the world’, having grown up in an environment where access to the internet means that geographical boundaries are far less important than they had been in the past.

What do Millennials expect from their employer?

1. Salary

A competitive salary was rated important by all generations, but particularly for ambitious Millennials where salary is largely seen as a reflection of their status and success. In fact, 96n percent of Millennials rated a competitive pay and bonus system as important, and 25 percent stated that this would be the number one reason they would change jobs.

Chris said: “It’s important to note that during the downturn, over half (53 percent) of Millennials took a job with a lower salary than expected. As such, employers should be mindful that this may be a contributing factor as to why salary and remuneration are so important to Millennials.

“It also means that as we move out of economic uncertainty they will expect their salaries to catch up to their expectations.”

2. Progression

Millennials want more than just a job – they want a career, with 69 percent citing a clear path for progression in the business as the most important factor in keeping them engaged.

Chris said: “It is perhaps unsurprising that for Millennials at the outset of their careers, a clear path to progression is the most effective motivator. However, this reflects not just the youth but also the ambition of this generation. Millennials have grown up being told they are capable of achieving anything and this confidence means that they crave responsibility early in their careers.”

In fact, 54 percent of Millennials state that having the opportunity to ‘exercise influence’ in the workplace is a key way to keep them engaged and remain with their current employer.

3. Transparency

Millennials do not shy away from responsibility, and they want to know what needs to be done to earn it. Of all generations surveyed, Millennials placed the highest value on transparency over how they could achieve progress in their career.

Seventy-one percent of Millennials strongly agreed that their employer should provide clear guidelines over earning bonuses or promotions. However, 40 percent of employers do not currently do this.

4. Fulfilment

During the recession many Millennials struggled to find jobs that met their expectations. Thirty-one percent reported that they had taken work in a sector that they did not wish to work in. Now, as the economic outlook improves, many are ready to change jobs to find a new role that better suits their ambitions.

Chris advises: “Employers looking to retain Millennial employees should consider giving them the option to move around the business to find a position that better suits their desired career path, particularly given that 70 percent of Millennials consider job rotation within the business one of the most important aspects of their job.”


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 13, 2019
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Analysis of the UK’s top 250 retailers has found a 19 percent year-on-year increase in the number of brands offering the option to pay in international currency.

The figure forms part of an annual performance index carried out by leading ecommerce and digital agency Visualsoft.

The report examined the sector’s biggest names and found that 81 percent of these retailers are offering customers the option to pay in non-sterling alternatives. This was an increase on the 62 percent of retailers that offered international payments in 2017. The majority of these are Euros and USD, with one percent of retailers offering Yen.

The increase is likely to be a reaction to Brexit-related uncertainty in the lead-up to 29th March.

The research also found that the prevalence of innovative payment methods is increasing. For example, after only being in the market for little over a year, Amazon Pay is already being used by 10 percent of top retailers – showing clear movement towards a more diverse spectrum of payments offered.

A further one-in-10 of retailers analysed offer finance products from lenders such as Klarna – up from almost nothing in 2017. Research has found that around three-quarters (78 percent) of consumers would consider purchasing through retail finance, with the average spend of £620, so offering this type of payment could prove a fundamental avenue for future growth.

However, this appeared to be having a detrimental impact on basic payment methods. A quarter (23 percent) fail to offer a payment choice other than a mainstream credit or debit card. This has worsened by four percent year-on-year.

Dale Higginbottom, head of CRO at Visualsoft, said: “These figures suggest proactivity in the lead-up to Brexit and adoption of new payment trends, which is great to see. However, we know that up to a quarter of consumers also abandon their transactions at checkout because the retailer doesn’t provide their payment method of choice.

“Offering a wide range of options is an important way for retailers to maximise their sales potential, but too many are still not doing so – with 23 percent neglecting an offer outside of traditional cards. This inability to get the basics right could prove crucial as we move into 2019.”


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 8, 2019
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The Customer Experience Professional Masterclass led by international CX consultant and author Ian Golding, is going from strength-to-strength in 2019 with more satisfied participants than ever.

The two-day class – which is followed by an opportunity to take the CCXP exam following a preparation workshop – sees participants learn the skills and knowledge needed to move a business towards full customer-centricity.

Featuring interactivity, discussions, case studies, and more, Ian, author of Customer What? The honest and practical guide to customer experience, is helping shape the CX landscape in the UK and beyond, empowering a new generation of professionals ready to put customer centricity at the heart of their organisations.

The recent February CX Masterclass was a huge success, and saw eager participants arrive in Stevenage from across the UK – and further afield – to engage.

Speaking of his experience, Ben Washburn, a CX Manager with legal software firm Hyperlaw, said: “I had a fantastic few days at the CX Masterclass. Customer Experience is such a crucial area of business that often doesn’t get the attention it deserves. If deployed properly, it is key to any successful business.

“A huge thank you to Ian for the eye opening insight and all the other attendees for a thoroughly enjoyable two days.”

Mary Geoghegan, a Senior Global Customer Service Leader with the national College of Ireland, said: “I was very impressed with Ian’s delivery of training, his passion, and his support to go above and beyond with his mentoring. Having completed the class I feel re-energised, re-focused, and totally positive that this is the area of business I want to be in and one in which I can make a difference.”

Customer Experience Leader with Bupa Global, Dean Arcan, flew in from Copenhagen to take part and was thrilled to learn from Ian, who also applies his knowledge in judging panels for various CX awards events such as the UK Customer Experience Awards.

“Ian is one of the most inspirational leaders I’ve ever met,” he said.

“He is extremely knowledgeable, passionate, and humble. He is a true example of a leader with purpose and integrity, who is committed to adding value to people.

I feel as though this Masterclass has been a milestone event in my career. I’ve learned so much I’m almost bursting with enthusiasm – even more than usual!

“Under Ian’s guidance I know I will be able to channel this a lot more effectively going forward. Keep doing what you are doing Ian, you are changing lives!”

Meanwhile, Sophie Rugg, a Customer Insight specialist with Wakefield and District Housing, described the Masterclass as “hands down the best training I have ever attended.”

She continued: “Ian is an absolute CX expert and delivers the class with clarity and an infectious enthusiasm. He has an incredible knack for dealing with complex topics with simplicity. I have come away from the class glowing and buzzing with new ideas. I can’t recommend tit highly enough.”

The next CX Professional Masterclass will take place at the Business & Technology Centre in Stevenage on April 23-24, with the CCXP Exam Workshop on the 25th. Click here to register.

For all Masterclass queries, please contact Antonija at antonija@cxm.co.uk.

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 7, 2019
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5min1182

CXM has partnered with the Customer & User Experience Expo, which is making its debut at the London ExCeL on the 27th & 28th March 2019, and is running alongside four other unique industry shows at Europe’s best marketing event.

The event will equip you with the tools, techniques, and systems to revolutionise your Customer Experience, pathing your journey to success.

Over 100 experts will be on hand to enlighten visitors with the very best Customer and User Experience guidance available, while an array of the industry’s biggest brands and most innovative suppliers will be showcasing the solutions shaping the future of CX and UX, all under one roof.

Among these industry professionals are the best-of-the-best to advise, educate, and influence the development of your CX plan for your business.

Keynote speakers include:

Daniel Ord – Founder of OmniTouch International

Daniel will share multiple examples from his work on Contact Centre Mystery Shopper programs, to highlight that it may be time to reinvent your approach to quality. He will also provide practical suggestions for doing so.

Nikki Patel – Head of Evaluation for Digital Development at NHS England

This presentation will take a look at developments in digital technology in the NHS and the direction of travel for the future, to ensure new opportunities can be grasped and citizen experience improved.

Nick Iron – Lead UX Designer at John Lewis

In this talk, Nick will use principles of heuristic traps in skiing and mountaineering to illustrate some of the mistakes that are commonly made in UX and UI design, and demonstrate how, whilst rarely fatal, they can be highly damaging to our careers or business success.

For all this and more, the 2019 free ticket for the Customer & User Experience Expo will also give you unprecedented access to the Call & Contact Centre Expo, B2B Marketing Expo, Marketing Technology Expo, and Sales Innovation Expo; with a combined lineup of 1,000 cutting-edge exhibitors, 500 educational seminars, and 200 interactive masterclasses, this is going to be a show like no other.

Visit the website today to secure your limited FREE ticket.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 5, 2019
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3min984

Customer Experience professionals are preparing to gather in Dublin for the 2019 European Insight Exchange event.

Taking place in the Irish capital on March 13-14 at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, the conference is hosted by the CXPA and is one of Europe’s premier events for sharing best practise and highlighting skills in Customer Experience.

A fantastic networking opportunity, the European Insight Exchange features workshops, a thought leader panel, and unique ‘Show & Tell’ sessions with professionals revealing inspiring details of successful CX initiatives that you can adapt for your own organisation.

Also taking place will be ‘Unwound Sharing’ forum sessions that bring attendees together for brainstorming and to receive valuable feedback on ideas. Topics covered here will include: Implementing Customer Focused Change; Going Beyond Surveys – Other Methods for Gathering Perceptions and Insights; Aligning Culture, CX and EX; Developing an Experience-Centric Culture; Measuring Customer Emotion; and Articulating the Value of CX.

The event – the theme of which this year is ‘Where is the Human in CX? – will also provide an opportunity to sit the CCXP Exam for attendees who pay the fee by February 13.

A spokesperson for the event said: “CXPA Members designed their annual Insight Exchange events to be like no other conference. These events offered in both Europe and the United States are planned, organised and executed by member volunteers just like you.

“These events are meant to be intimate gatherings with opportunities for fearless sharing and chances to learn from people who are walking in your shoes. Whether or not you’re a member of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA), and no matter where you are on your CX journey, the 2019 European Insight Exchange is the perfect opportunity to expand your network and your knowledge with more than 150 Customer Experience professionals.”

Two additional free workshops with a value of €1,000 are also included for those who register. To find out more about registering for the event, click here.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 28, 2019
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3min1070

Mark Seemann is a UK tech pioneer and telecommunications trailblazer who is now CEO of StaffCircle, a firm providing a work platform that improves internal communication and feedback for employees.

StaffCircle digitises sentiment, awards, communication, training, ideas, tasks, holidays, and directory and delivers it to staff via the smartphone in their pocket. This reduces staff attrition and creates greater employee engagement, empowerment, and productivity.

In an interview with CXM, Mark discusses the future of employee engagement, and why that future is the here and now…

Tell us about StaffCircle and what the company does

StaffCircle is an Internal Communications and Performance Management Platform. It is designed for organisations needing to have two-way communications and feedback with their office-based employees and also their non-desk-based digitally disconnected workforce.

As the relevance of the Customer Experience concept rises, how important is Employee Experience in this new era?

It’s crucial! Engaged employees deliver a better service and ultimately, happier customers. Employee Experience spans a number of areas, and one of them is Digital Experience which is why we created StaffCircle – to help companies open up the feedback loop between business leaders and the entire workforce.

What are some common failings of firms when it comes to employee engagement?

Most non-desk employees aren’t digitally connected to their companies. One-way communication prevails usually through email or paper.

Companies lack the systems and capability to deliver a consistent Employee Experience across both desk and non-desk-based employees because current systems are not designed for the modern smartphone-centric workforce. This disconnect can cause disengaged employees and information silos.

What are some simple steps organisations can take towards improving employee engagement?

Listen to your employees using surveys or internal workshops. Companies need to create faster feedback loops, opening up a digital information flow with their employees at scale. Take a look at the new technology now available, such as StaffCircle, to see how companies can engage digitally with employees with a Company Information Feed, One2Ones, Learning, Appraisals, and Polls.

What is the future of the relationship between firms and employees as technology and other factors continue to make an impact on that relationship?

Organisations need to engage in structured two-way communications rather than one-way unstructured comms (eg: email or paper).

Organisations need to listen to their employees using digital tools enabling faster feedback and greater information flow. Millennials use advanced digital technology (smartphone apps) at home and on the go; it’s time organisations mobilised their technology stack and opened it up to all of their employees.

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 25, 2019
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SDL, a global leader in content creation, translation, and delivery, has outlined six recommendations for companies looking to unlock the strategic power of an intelligent content supply chain in 2019, giving them the ability to engage with anyone, anywhere, in their own language and device of choice.

A November 2018 Forrester Consulting study, Today’s Content Supply Chains Prevent Continuous Customer Journeys, commissioned by SDL, revealed that companies need to develop a Global Content Operating Model (GCOM), a framework that aligns people, technology, and processes across a company, helping them mature the way they create, translate, and deliver content to their customers. This helps brands handle the growing volume and velocity of content required to engage with worldwide audiences.

The study also found that brands rely too heavily on disjointed technologies including a collection Web Content Management Systems, network drives, and document management systems, supported by poorly orchestrated human translation, to build customer experiences on a global scale. Internal organisational silos also add to the complexity involved in providing continuity across the pre-sale, sale, and post-sale phases of the customer journey.

“To reach the desired end state of intelligent content, companies need to build for the future today,” according to the Forrester study. “They need to rethink their current processes, technology, and organisational structures to be prepared for a future where the strategic value of content continues to grow and determines the difference between company success and failure.

Peggy Chen, Chief Marketing Officer at SDL, said: “The result of organisational and technological disconnects is poor, fragmented experiences and frustrated customers. At a time when customers are turning online dozens of times a day, that’s an enormous missed opportunity. By commissioning this study from Forrester Consulting we have uncovered the key problems and developed a set of six recommendations that outline a path for brands to consider in 2019 when evolving their content supply chain.”

1.Take control of your content supply chain

The volume and velocity at which brands create content is out of control, and it’s only going to become more complex. Ninety-three percent of brands say they will produce more content in the next two years. Half estimate the volume of content will increase by more than 30 percent (and a third estimate by more than 40 percent), according to the Forrester Consulting study.

The answer to fixing this is to regain content control across the organisation. The GCOM can help brands achieve this, moving from a manual operating model towards automated and even autonomous for global content creation, translation and delivery.

2. Explore intelligent content platforms

Only about one third of brands believe they provide customers with a continuous customer experience, according to the study. Brands looking to deliver meaningful and consistent customer experiences, across multiple channels and languages, will need vast amounts of content – more than it’s possible for marketing teams to create. Companies will require an intelligent, flexible and AI-driven architecture. Applying intelligence to a content ecosystem will help companies automate tasks, and reduce the cost involved in managing extreme amounts of content.

3. Rethink how content is constructed

The popularity of video, chatbots, virtual assistants, and other emerging channels are on the rise. Brands expect these to significantly grow over the next two years, yet only 29 percent say that they are very satisfied with the ability of their tools to engage with customers across these channels, and deliver a continuous experience, according to the study.

Rethink how content is constructed and shared across teams so that it can be adapted for these new delivery models with minimal rework and maximum impact. This will help brands deliver content faster across different channels, languages, and audiences.

4. Be ready to adapt content for any channel

Customers want content, across multiple channels, at any time of day. Therefore, how do brands create enough content to meet demand? Little more than half of firms have a centralised and standardised toolset for the creation (51 percent), translation (54 percent), and delivery (56 percent) of content across regions and languages. Bringing systems together to increase the delivery of easily consumed content, ensures its consistency across all stages of the buying cycle.

5. Realise that customers want product information

Buyers and users want the details about products and services not just after the deal is done, but during the buying cycle to understand their investments and make more informed decisions. Brands understand this trend. Three-quarters (77 percent) admit that keeping product information relevant and up-to-date is critical to a good Customer Experience.

They also agree that improving access to product information would have the single greatest positive impact on Customer Experience – more so than any other type of content. Brands need to be ready to deliver everything from production manuals, videos, and spec sheets to customers, in their own language and to the highest standards.

6. Leadership should drive change

According to the study, 82 percent of firms agree content is critical to their company’s success in achieving top business objectives. Despite this, three quarters (80 percent) believe that current content supply chain challenges impede their ability to deliver on top business objectives.

The Vice President and C-level executives should be the driving force behind digital change. They have the advantage of seeing cross-departmental, global activities, and may be in a better position to spot broken or redundant processes.

Improved content supply chains lead to robust departmental and business-wide benefits. Companies gain improved productivity, higher customer engagement, increased conversion rates, and increased customer satisfaction, among other benefits.




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Customer Experience Magazine is the online magazine packed full of industry news, blogs, features, reports, case studies, video bites and international stories all focusing on customer experience.


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Paul Ainsworth
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Tel: 0207 1937 483

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