Ian GoldingIan GoldingMay 13, 2019
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5min416

Customer Experience specialist Ian Golding, author of Customer What: The Honest and Practical Guide to Customer Experience, writes for Customer Experience Magazine offering expert insight to help businesses improve their CX offering. 

To ask Ian a question on how to boost the Customer Experience provided by YOUR business, please email your question to editor@cxm.world. The best questions will be featured in future instalments.

Ian also leads the CX Professional Masterclass. Click here for details of upcoming Masterclass dates.

I believe my business is running smoothly, and I have had no complaints so far, but how can I test my touchpoints to identify potential problems before a customer does? 

This is a great question!

The only way to determine if your perception of your business is a reflection of reality is to ‘put yourself in your customers shoes’!

Whilst it is perfectly feasible that you are delivering a consistently good experience that is meeting the needs and expectations of customers, it is important to understand that very often, when things are going wrong, customers will not tell you about it! The only time you will realise there is a problem, is when it is too late.

So to ‘test’ the touchpoints in the customer journey, you must experience them for yourself in exactly the same way the customer does. This is an activity/exercise that should be done on a regular basis – and not just by you!

Everyone in your organisation should be experiencing the customer journey on a regular basis and reporting back observations (both positive and negative). Even if you are in a ‘business-to-business’ relationship, it is still vital to see what your customer sees’.

Too many organisations are not genuinely putting themselves in their customers shoes on a continuous basis. Doing so will enable the proactive management of the customer journey.


Ian GoldingIan GoldingMarch 15, 2019
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4min598

Customer Experience specialist Ian Golding, author of Customer What: The Honest and Practical Guide to Customer Experience, writes for Customer Experience Magazine offering expert insight to help businesses improve their CX offering. 

To ask Ian a question on how to boost the Customer Experience provided by YOUR business, please email your question to editor@cxm.world. The best questions will be featured in future instalments.

Ian also leads the CX Professional Masterclass. Click here for details of upcoming Masterclass dates.

As a smaller business, should I consider customer loyalty schemes as part of my Customer Experience Strategy? Can they add value to my business, or is it common for customers to fail to engage with them?

I have always believed that if done well, customer loyalty schemes can be extremely effective as a way of maintaining engagement with those who interact with your products and services.

By “if done well”, I am suggesting that some are not!

Typically, the domain of large corporations in the travel, hospitality, and retail industries (although not exclusively), if the ‘effort’ is effortless and the ‘reward’ is rewarding, then a loyalty scheme could be a differentiating factor in the mind of your customer.

Personally, as a frequent traveller I will always look to fly or stay with an airline or hotel that will provide me with a benefit for using them regularly. To me, the reward of ‘free’ flights or hotel stays is a worthwhile incentive to keep using certain brands.

However, the loyalty scheme alone must only be perceived as just one touchpoint in the customer journey – if other things in the journey go wrong, I will gladly give up my perceived ‘benefits’ and take my business elsewhere.

There is absolutely no reason why the principle of a loyalty scheme should not be applied by smaller organisations – as long as it is sincere and commercially viable and a way of driving differentiation.

However, there is no sense putting a loyalty scheme in place if it will run your bottom line into the ground! Also, do not forget the ‘sincerity’ part of my statement. If a loyalty scheme is perceived by your customers as a way to try to ‘sell them more’ or spam them, then it may be better not doing it in the first place.


Ian GoldingIan GoldingFebruary 7, 2019
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4min845

Customer Experience specialist Ian Golding, author of Customer What: The Honest and Practical Guide to Customer Experience, writes for Customer Experience Magazine offering expert insight to help businesses improve their CX offering. 

To ask Ian a question on how to boost the Customer Experience provided by YOUR business, please email your question to editor@cxm.world. The best questions will be featured in future instalments.

Ian also leads the CX Professional Masterclass. Click here for details of upcoming Masterclass dates.

Should any business (irrespective of size) hire an individual who possesses an understanding of the competencies and capabilities required for an organisation to become sustainably customer-centric?

The answer to this is, in my humble opinion, is simple…..YES!

As anyone who has heard me speak, or read my thoughts on the subject of Customer Experience in the past will know, CX is now recognised globally as a bona fide profession. This fact demonstrates that like all professions, there is a ‘science’ that defines the work that someone in a Customer Experience role performs. The ‘science’ is formed of six competencies, established by the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA). These are:

Customer-Centric Culture

Voice of the Customer, Customer Insight, and Understanding

Organisational Adoption and Accountability

Customer Experience Strategy

Experience Design, Improvement, and Innovation

Metrics, Measurement, and ROI

This is a broad set of subject areas that Customer Experience Professionals (CXPs) are expected to have a good working knowledge of. The best CXPs in the world apply the science in a way that is appropriate to every and any situation/scenario they face. If an organisation has an aspiration to become sustainably customer-centric, it will find it extremely difficult to do so if it does not contain the expertise and specialisms to make it a tangible reality.

What official title an organisation gives someone with these skills is actually not that important; what is critical is that the organisation recognises the importance of Customer Experience capability and enables those with the skillset to work alongside their colleagues to drive a cross-functional, collaborative approach to becoming customer-centric.

To find out more about the Certified Customer Experience Professional qualification, visit the CCXP website.

To find out more about Ian’s CX Masterclasses and CCXP Exam Preparation Workshops, click here.




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