Howard LaxHoward LaxJune 23, 2020
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8min1113

The pandemic has dramatically redefined how we live, work, play and interact with each other. Our daily routines, relationships of all stripes, simple indulgences, even our personal hygiene have been upended.

No one really knows if this will turn out to be a seismic interruption of some duration after which life slowly returns to BC (Before COVID) or if “normal” has been indelibly altered.

Regardless of what tomorrow looks like, one thing remains unchanged: the underlying rationale for focusing on Customer Experience.

CX is a business strategy rooted in the proven premise that the experiences a customer enjoys (or endures) today will affect their relationship with and behaviour towards a firm tomorrow. It is incumbent upon the firm to deliver those experiences that motivate the customer behaviours that create value for the company, while minimising the likelihood of customer behaviours that destroy value.

What’s changed?

While the objectives behind CX remain unshaken, the context, the operating environment has been shaken to its core by the pandemic shock waves.

1. All modern economies are consumer-driven and, mostly, decentralised. That is, customers have options and create business winners and losers by the choices they make. The concept of consumer “choice” has a new meaning, however, when the unemployment rate is the highest it has been in 90-some-odd years. No one working today was in the work force the last time we saw similar levels of unemployment (as well as underemployment).

2. For those fortunate enough to be employed, spending patterns have been disrupted: savings rates have climbed sharply, while discretionary spending is down. This household fiscal conservatism may be prudent financial management, but it isn’t a very good way to reignite the economy and boost business.

3. Distribution channels have been broken, disrupted and redefined. Both the supply chain into the firm from its suppliers and the outbound channels have been affected.

4. Employees are frenzied, almost apoplectic. To say that employees are worried and treading water in a sea of uncertainty would be an understatement. They are trying to navigate between and cope with the lesser of two evils, the dual threat to their family’s health, on the one hand, and their economic well-being, on the other.

5. Customer experience delivery systems have been upended, redefined or taxed to breaking. For most firms, their employees were their CX delivery system. The in-person dimension is just beginning to come back on-stream, albeit in new ways. Phone, chat and video conferencing have catapulted in importance, but we just don’t know how this will affect customer relationships over time.

Digital solutions certainly saved the day for many companies – the more digitally prepared a company was going into this mess, the more likely they were to not see a serious disruption in the experiences they delivered. Virtually every firm has seen its customer touchpoints and journeys disrupted, redefined and pushed to their limit.

6. Customers are frustrated: some want to return to life Before COVID as quickly as possible and are impatient for the world to reopen. Others are reluctant to jump back in too quickly. All are faced with an environment where the economic, health and familial issues are compounded by political dimensions that colour everything.

What needs to be on the To-Do List?

Companies need to focus on those challenges that most affect them and where they can have an impact.

Employees are front and centre. It will be a Buyer’s employment market for years to come, with plenty of ‘warm bodies’ to hire – but attracting and retaining the right talent will require a reciprocal bond of trust between employee and employer.

Companies need to understand and empathise, in both words and deeds, and smooth the transition back to a new working normal.

  • Make sure you involve employees in the process of re-acclimation to whatever the new normal becomes. Ask for and respond to their input . . . then ask again, and again, and yet again.
  • Companies must make their employees feel safe. This will, at some point, inevitably lead to a conflict with a customer who is, shall we say, is a bit more cavalier in their attitude and behaviour regarding the pandemic and health risks: the customer may be royalty, but the firm must support their employees in their efforts to protect their safety.

There has been a secular shift away from in-person experiences to experiences delivered remotely. For the most part, customers have been understanding of the challenges companies faced in shifting to all remote interactions, but the digital and electronic world make shopping around and switching easier.

When the smoke clears, companies will need to be more nimble than ever in delivering experiences where, when and how customers feel most comfortable – and that location, time and mode of interaction are likely to evolve over time, especially if there is a second wave.

Ultimately, of course, it’s about the customer and how to meet their needs and expectations. Let me offer three suggestions.

  • First, assume that all prior measurements and key driver models need to be revalidated and/or updated and regularly monitored until we come out of the other end of the tunnel. If nothing else, you will need to add new items to measure around health and safety and gauge their impact on customer experiences and loyalty.
  • Second, borrow a page from the scientists and the way public health experts and policy makers have responded to the pandemic: take a data-driven approach to decision making. All of us have heard people wax on about the pandemic numbers, the shape of the curve and the latest predictions. Yes, the data changes and the models evolve, but they are the only sound criteria for decision making.
  • Finally, this is a perfect scenario for what we at Confirmit refer to as VoC/E: augmenting your VoC work with direct input from employees regarding how to redress customer experience problems and shortfalls. When customers flag a performance failure or disappointment, mobilise employee input for possible solutions. This is a great way to generate ideas for how to respond to changing customer needs and concerns and actively involve employees to both improve the customer experience and boost employee engagement at the same time.

The business imperative for CX may be the same, but the environment presents a host of new challenges demanding attention. Companies need to respond smartly.


Claire SportonClaire SportonMay 13, 2020
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8min1244

We’re all familiar with the phrase ‘actions speak louder than words’ but for customers and businesses alike this statement has never been so true or so important.

Mission statements are quite rightly populated with encouragement: “We put the customer at the heart of our business” and “Customer First”. However, in these current extraordinary times, listening to understand our customers’ and employees’ rapidly changing needs, prioritising what is going to have the biggest impact and of course delivering change must be the number one priority to enable businesses to ride this storm.

Businesses are examining feedback about virtually every aspect of their operations – from policies and processes to messaging and delivery – but company culture is key. Culture is typically what you do when no one is looking but guess what? For many organisations shifting unexpectedly into remote working…no-one is looking!

Achieving the ultimate goal of becoming a truly customer-centric organisation may therefore appear to be an uphill struggle. It’s certainly true that there is no quick fix.

The answer lies in not simply collecting customer feedback about successes and failures but using it to help us change the way people think, behave and act throughout our organisations, even if they are working from home. In other words, to use customer feedback to shift company culture towards customer centricity.

The question is how do you actually inspire employees to make the change? We all know asking large numbers of people to move out of their comfort zones and do things differently is not easy at the best of times. An annual kick-off or away-day can be thought provoking but it doesn’t necessarily help people to break out of the mould when they are back at their desk.

The good news is that although we don’t currently have the opportunity to bring people physically together, we can focus on supporting more customer centric decision making and behaviours as the best way of delivering that culture change.

Listen closely

Being absolutely clear about what is expected is the key to moving the dial and this has certainly been the case for Cromwell, a leading UK and international supplier of high-quality industrial tools and services. It demonstrated its long-term commitment to delivering a truly customer-focused service by creating a dedicated insight function following its acquisition by W.W. Grainger, Inc. in 2015 and then centralising its customer service processes in 2018.

Elaine Barnes, Chief Customer Officer at Cromwell has explained that in order to minimise the impact of organisational changes on its customers, it needed to change its company culture – putting the focus firmly on the customer: “We needed to improve our ability to listen to and respond to customers so that we could enhance the experience across the entire the customer journey.”

Confirmit worked with the team to create and deploy a CX programme that is reflective of customer needs and what Cromwell can do to respond, empowering them throughout the process. In the first month after going live, the company immediately achieved a 12% response rate, delivering critical insights into the issues that matter to customers.

The feedback so far is extremely encouraging and it’s clear that Cromwell’s ability to listen more effectively and to respond immediately to what customers are saying means that people feel that their feedback is being heard. It has already resulted a significant jump in its Net Promoter Score®.

The ongoing challenge is to ensure that the CX programme acts as a catalyst for change outside of the core Insights team. No one person owns CX and the ‘Command and Control’ approach simply doesn’t work. It’s for this reason that around 200 of Cromwell’s employees have been trained to use the insight dashboards to help drive customer centricity across the organisation.

Providing as many people as possible in the organisation with a window into the feedback generated through the CX programme creates what I think of as mini control centres across an organisation, driven by a central hub. Each employee is therefore responsible for using that insight to impact the customer experience in their area of control, in their own way but aligned to a shared vision and ethos.

Cromwell will also be introducing text analytics and launching nine new listening posts covering different states and channels of the customer journey this year. These initiatives, combined with a Voice of the Employee (VoE) and Voice of the Supplier (VoS) programme in the future, will provide another layer of actionable insight from additional touchpoints, alerting and nudging people to make incremental changes.

The insight will not only enhance Cromwell’s ability to carry out root cause analysis to find out the source of customer and wider business issues. It will also enable Cromwell to build a network of champions inside and outside of the organisation.

Lead by example

For me, this is where the heart of customer centricity lies. Data is a great start, actionable insight and nudging people to think outside of the box can make a real difference but the ultimate goal is to create viral change that makes a lasting impact.

Champions shine a light on what is possible and inspire others to follow suit. They can not only answer questions and help to ensure that the value of the CX programme is understood, they can also become the catalyst for new behaviours that you are looking to cultivate. They can share their experiences and prove to others that those behaviours work, encouraging people to join in.

The simple truth is that people help people to make change happen. If, like Cromwell, you ensure that your teams have access to that mini command centre so they are basing their behaviour on something solid, you will also be on the road to achieving your goal of customer centricity.

 

Interesting Links:


Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiApril 30, 2020
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3min1033

Global CX and market research solutions provider Confirmit announces the COVID-19 Resource Hub programme of solutions to support the insight industry, lending a helping hand in building stronger future for organisations.

The initiative will provide insight professionals a platform to interact with each other, learn from Confirmit’s experienced consulting team and get use of dedicated solutions available on the Confirmit Horizons platform.

The initiative is structured into three insights teams’ vital areas:

1. Connecting the community – Confirmit will make discussion groups to connect peers, share webinars and offer an increasing online resource library to CX and EX teams, as well as to Market Researchers.

2. Insights professionals support – One-to-one conversations with Confirmit experts are available to support organisations around key insight areas while enabling professionals to learn more about improving their skills to deliver greater business value.

3. Free dedicated solutions – Those who are already using the Confirmit Horizons platform can use new dedicated solutions and text analytics capabilities to aid better understanding of the needs of their customers and employees.

Henning Hansen, interim CEO at Confirmit explained:

“Our clients and the wider insights market are finding ways to adjust to our new reality, and we are committed to supporting them in every possible way. The ability to understand customers, employees and markets has never been more critical to helping companies make the right decisions. To that end, we must also focus on the future to ensure our customers are supported in the long term. We continue to work hard to ensure that our merger with Dapresy delivers exceptional solutions that deliver business-critical insight”.

“This is a challenging time for our customers, and we have found great value in using the Confirmit text analytics tool, including their proactive addition of the new COVID-19 features, to understand their needs and expectations,” said Barbara Lincoln, director of customer satisfaction and integration at Erie Insurance. “

By leveraging insights the tool provides, we have been able to better anticipate and provide support to ERIE’s customers, agents and employees.”

Confirmit’s COVID-19 Resource Hub is available here, and the free solutions are available immediately to Confirmit Horizons users.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 19, 2020
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4min1360

Global CX and market research solutions provider Confirmit is set to merge with data visualisation reporting firm Dapresy following Confirmit’s acquisition by North European specialist growth equity investor Verdane.

The major investor in Dapresy, Verdane will merge the two companies to create a combination of solutions that “will be unmatched in the market research and Customer Experience arena,” according to Verdane partner Pål Malmros.

As news of the merger broke, Tobi Andersson, CEO of Dapresy, said: “Dapresy has comprehensive CX and market research reporting software, and Confirmit provides the technology that underpins some of the world’s most sophisticated insights programmes. Together, we will provide customers with state-of-the-art collection and reporting for marketing research and customer experience management.”

Ken Østreng, CEO at Confirmit, explained: “This is a hugely exciting move not only for both businesses and their customers, but also for the wider market. As companies who share our goals and values, we’re delighted to be working with both Verdane and Dapresy as we enter this new chapter.”

Confirmit and Dapresy already share many clients. All customers of both companies will enjoy the benefits of further investments in existing products, and “a seamless integration between Confirmit’s solutions and Dapresy’s reporting, which will provide a highly efficient, end-to-end solution that delivers accelerated customer value”.

Employees of both companies will benefit from working with a larger team with exceptional expertise, which will continue to deliver client value through market-leading technology solutions.

Commenting on the news, Faith Adams, Senior Analyst at Forrester, said: “CX is finally getting its due – truly becoming a critical priority for many companies. And because of this, the vendor space to support it, both technology and services, continues to rapidly evolve.

“With this, there continues to be convergence – often happening by way of acquisition. This convergence is not just about specific features and functionality of CX tools, it is about the convergence across the business – employee experience, customer insights, market research, data and analytics, and more.”

Confirmit has a history of highly successful mergers and acquisitions that have strengthened the business and delivered significant value to customers. Previous mergers include: Pulse Train, CustomerSat, Techneos, Integrasco, and IRM.

Verdane is joined by Zobito, the equity growth investor, as co-investor. The Zobito team will bring its “go-to-market expertise and experience” from working with companies such as QlikView to the journey.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthOctober 31, 2019
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3min1786

UK Customer Experience Awards finalist Confirmit has announced a new Principal Director of CX Consulting.

Howard Lax (pictured below) is a former Vice President, Customer Experience Practice Lead for Directions Research and held consulting roles with Kantar TNS, Harris Interactive, ORC and GfK Custom Research. He holds a PhD in Political Science from The Graduate Center, City University of New York.

With more than 20 years of consulting experience, Lax has a deep background in Customer Experience,  Market Research, and employee engagement strategy. He has supplier and client-side experience in B2B and B2C space in industries like technology, financial services, retail, automotive, and hospitality.

In his role, Mr Lax will support clients in their efforts to design, develop, and implement their Customer Experience vision.

He said: “I am eager to bring a new perspective to the table, leveraging my experience and Confirmit’s wide array of services to help drive real change and better business outcomes for customers. In my experience, emotions are the driver behind the attachment a customer feels for a business. Driving a premium customer experience solidifies these relationships, and great technology is a critical enabler in this process.”

Chris Brown, Vice President of Global Consulting at Confirmit, added: “Adding a highly knowledgeable industry veteran to our team solidifies our commitment to providing our clients with access to talented consultants that can help their CX programmes drive real business success. Our consulting services ensure our technology can drive real insight and change. Howard’s expertise in customer and employee experience will help our customers further leverage our solutions to differentiate themselves from competitors.”


Phil DurandPhil DurandOctober 29, 2019
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7min2872

 

If there is one lesson Phil Durand (pictured), Director of Customer Experience Management at Confirmit re-learned as a judge at this year’s UK Customer Experience Awards, it’s that there is real value in making things as simple as possible…

The aim of Voice of the Customer programmes is not to just to listen but to act.

In order to make this a reality, not a theoretical exercise, it’s vital that we all remember that creating a great Customer Experience is all about people. It requires a commitment to empowering people to use their initiative and to make a difference at every stage of the customer lifecycle. Technology is obviously an enabler, helping us to gather customer feedback, but the people that use technology to understand and harness the insight provided are the ones that make the real difference.

In the Best Use of Insight and Feedback category at the recent UK Customer Experience Awards, we were reminded of some of basic CX truths: ask the right people, the right questions, at the right time and in the right manner.

Continuous temperature checks on experience won’t necessarily drive response rates. In some cases they can do the opposite. Hands-on support was stressed, even if this means helping execs to access and make use of the VoC dashboard. Sharing voice recordings so that managers can literally hear the ‘voice’ of the customer can provide a shortcut to understanding what customers think and literally drive action to the next level.

In my view, best practice CX requires careful identification of the key challenges to be addressed. It needs razor-sharp focus on that end goal, whether it be culture change, boosting morale, increased revenue, or cost savings.

Just as important is the determination to share feedback to both the c-suite and the factory floor so that it can be used to take even the smallest of steps to improve the customer experience. Clear and effective communication is needed to make sure that the message is not lost in translation. And this means keeping it simple. If you bombard people with too much detail, you won’t take them with you.

Finals: Phil Durand judged at the 2019 UK Customer Experience Awards

Text analytics as a companion to VoC surveys has proven to be the ideal partnership in this respect. They complement each other because they provide insight into what the customer really thinks, in their own words, as well as what they may divulge in answer to a direct question in a survey.

Upon combining both forms of insight in a single dashboard, comments are longer  regarded as ‘random’ but become representative, actively bringing  ‘the numbers’ to life.

The idea, of course, is not to blind people with science or to hide behind the data. There’s no point empowering employees to go the extra mile if they can’t make sense of the insight you’ve gathered. It’s more effective to present insight in bite-size chunks that are appropriate for each stage of the customer journey and then share it in a digestible form with those responsible for delivering Customer Experience at that stage.

This is why I stress the importance of simplicity.

Yes, behind the scenes there may be some serious maths, crunching large quantities of data, but in order for people to engage with the insight there is no point in making it look more complex than it needs to be. Or making it too hard to find the nugget of insight that they need to do things differently.

That won’t empower anybody.

It’s still very true to say that people are more likely to be inspired by another person than a pie chart. They respond at a basic human level so while it is absolutely essential that we embrace data analysis in the background, make sure your employees can hear what customers are saying direct. So they can do something about it.

Not so complex after all.


Phil DurandPhil DurandSeptember 27, 2019
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10min2004

It’s not long before the winners of the 2019 UK Customer Experience Awards will be unveiled.

As one of the judges, Phil Durand (pictured), Director of Customer Experience Management at Confirmit knows that success comes in many forms and that the key to continued success is a combination of evolution, and the occasional spot of revolution…

 

 

Such is the growing acceptance of CX that there are few businesses today which have not embraced customer insight or deployed Voice of the Customer programmes in one form or another.

A greenfield site really is a rare find! This is great, but it’s fair to say that whether you are ‘doing it yourself’ or doing it on behalf of a client, there may be elements that you have inherited from a previous initiative that are no longer providing the insights that you need today.

There may some great foundations in place, but your business objectives may have changed and the CX programme may therefore need a refresh.

The challenge is how do you decide which aspects of the CX programme would benefit from renovation, and which elements should be discarded? From time-to-time, you need to take stock of what is working, what would benefit from remodelling, and where you need to pour new foundations and build from the ground up.

Take a listening inventory

A useful way to initiate a CX remodelling exercise is to take a listening inventory to help you identify and increase your focus on current business objectives; improve the integration of operational data with customer feedback; better understand how, when, and what types of questions are asked; and how you can use the results (beyond improving NPS and customer satisfaction scores) to drive business change.

Note: do not assume that your CX team controls every customer survey, because you’ll almost certainly be wrong. In any large business, it is incredible to learn how many well-intentioned but often ill-advised surveys are being sent out to customers seemingly at random. Find them!

Consider the following questions:

Is anyone using the data?

If people are no longer taking action on the feedback gathered, why ask?

You may be asking survey questions that are no longer aligned to current business objectives. If surveys and reports aren’t motivating people to do things differently within your organisation, don’t be afraid to consign them to the bin.

Ask yourself what business problems need to be solved, or what business objectives need to be achieved. What should be the focus of your CX surveys? Achieving culture change? Increasing revenue? Reducing costs? Uncovering cross-selling opportunities?

Is it too vanilla? 

If the CX programme only uses surveys to gather data, it’s probably time to try something different. Try integrating background data with simple surveys to make the process easier on customers and to add depth to reporting. This will enable CX teams to more efficiency prioritise key customers and critical actions with the additional context. 

If you are not integrating operational data with customer feedback, it will be much harder to create a truly accurate and complete picture of the customer. Mapping and integrating data from across the business could help to make CX data more useful and actionable, providing additional detail and different perspectives.

Too many questions? 

This is the most common cause of low response rates and dismal completion rates. The last thing any organisation should do is turn customers away from the brand by deploying surveys that are too long.

The solution is to minimise disruptions to customers by cutting irrelevant or unnecessary questions. Try to look at survey questions from the customer’s point of view – what would they like to answer and when? Is the relationship survey being sent around a customer renewal date? Are you using triggers like when people have filed a complaint or purchased an additional product?

Are you addressing shrinking attention spans by keeping questions short and using phrases customers will easily understand? Can you replace half a dozen closed questions with more open questions that invite customers to share their stories in their own words?

If so, do it and use text analytics to mine the insight from these words.

Spread too thin? 

If the CX team is trying to do too much, there could be an increased risk of programme sprawl. This will not only result in haphazard data and customer-facing chaos but potential damage to the brand. Your CX programme must have a clear structure, a well-defined plan and a commitment to consistency. Otherwise it will be hard or nearly impossible to connect all the data. 

What is your definition of success? Is there an executive sponsor sharing the results? Is there a dedicated team responding to systematic issues customers are raising? Is there a network of frontline CX champions with a clear role?

Sharing ownership of CX across the entire business will help you to drive business change. Remember, collecting data is great but the aim is not just to analyse it but to use it to bring about business change. Can you link your CX activities back to financial metrics like an increase in revenue or cost reduction? Look beyond improvements in NPS and customer satisfaction scores.

Continuous improvement

Whether your CX programme requires a complete rebuild, an extensive remodel, or a lick of paint, completing a listening inventory will help you take a step in the right direction. Taking the time to audit the programme will help you to protect the brand; ensure the efficient use of technology and help you engage with your customers.

The single source of VoC truth is an achievable goal and if you put in place a process of continuous improvement, you will achieve your goal of delivering richer insights and enhance Customer Experience at the same time.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthAugust 15, 2019
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3min1837

UK Customer Experience Awards finalist Confirmit has announced a new Vice President of Global CX Consulting, to lead a team that will deliver CX consulting services to outstanding for clients worldwide.

Chris Brown has stepped into the role, and will ensure Confirmit’s consulting offering provides the clear, consistent guidance that its customers need to deliver successful Customer Experience programmes. Increasingly, this means aligning CX to Employee Experience to drive real business and cultural change.

Chris (pictured left) has worked with the CX Consulting team since joining the company in 2012. He has extensive experience across the CX and Market Research industries, and during his time at Confirmit has worked in close partnership with many clients to design and develop highly successful CX programmes.

His experience, combined with the team’s varied expertise, creates a world-class CX resource delivering best practices across different regions, industries, customer types, and partners.

Confirmit has been shortlisted as finalists in two categories at the UK Customer Experience Awards, which take place at London’s Wembley Stadium this October. Both entries are in partnership with healthcare provider Bupa.

Speaking of his new role, Chris said: “Technology is a huge enabler in the development of data-driven CX programmes. However, most businesses will also benefit from being able to draw upon real world experience and expertise to make their CX vision a reality.

“We work hard to form strong partnerships with our customers, enabling them to learn, apply and benefit from our experience. I’m looking forward to working with the growing consulting team to ensure that we deliver the added value that our customers require in their pursuit of CX excellence.”

Meanwhile, Ken Østreng, President and CEO of Confirmit said: “Chris’ promotion highlights the importance Confirmit places on building true partnerships with our clients. We are committed to providing world-class software but have long recognised the vital role that guidance and experience take in ensuring real business success. Helping our customers to unlock the full potential of our solutions not only delivers the results they are looking for, but also provides us with an opportunity to respond to market demand for continued innovation.”


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthApril 3, 2019
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3min1338

2018 UK Customer Experience Awards finalist Confirmit has been recognised at a prestigious US awards event for Employee Experience.

The Tech Culture Awards recognise the “best-of-the-best work cultures within the technology sector, highlighting organisations that are committed to continuously improving the work-life balances of their employees” and this year awarded a gong to Confirmit, which is among the world’s leading SaaS vendors for multi-channel Customer Experience, Employee Engagement, and Market Research solutions.

As a seasoned technology business, Confirmit – whose Director Philip Durand also judged at the 2018 UK Customer Experience Awards finals in London’s Wembley Arena – offers the stable and secure environment of a well-established company while retaining the agility and entrepreneurial spirit of a fast-moving company.

Employees work closely together, despite being based in several offices around the world, and the company offers an excellent working culture, strong career development opportunities, and the ability to make a real impact in the organisation and with clients.

Heidi Brumbach, Executive Vice President for Global Human Resources at Confirmit said: “At Confirmit, we’re very proud of our culture of collaboration and knowledge sharing. We’re honoured to be recognised for our efforts in cultivating a flexible and enriching environment that promotes employee development and encourages innovation. Our collaborative approach internally has been proven time and time again to deliver top-notch service and reliable guidance to our customers.”

The Tech Culture Awards are hosted by TMC.net, whose Group Editor-in-Chief, Rich Tehrani, said: “The mission of these Tech Culture Awards is quite simple. We have surveyed and selected companies who are looking for the best and brightest tech talent and are willing to go the extra mile to provide what they believe is the ideal tech culture.

“Confirmit has demonstrated that they are committed to growth through providing a truly distinct and upbeat environment, rewarding employees for their contributions, and focusing on work-life balance.”

Entries for the 2019 UK Customer Experience Awards, which will be held in London on October 10 are now open, across 24 categories.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 27, 2019
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4min1088

Confirmit, one of the world’s premier names in VoC research, has won a major customer service award in the US.

The company – which was a finalist at the 2018 UK Customer Experience Awards – claimed the Business Intelligence Solution – New Version title at the 13th annual Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Service, which were held this month in Las Vegas.

Attended by more than 650 executives from around the world, the gala ceremony at the iconic Caesars Palace venue is one of the biggest awards events of its kind in the United States.

Confirmit was honoured for enabling organisations to drive real business change from their insights and feedback programmes by helping people make better decisions and then monitoring action to ensure that they have a positive impact on key business results.

This capability is underpinned by Confirmit’s engagement technologies that incorporate action management techniques, predictive analytics, and machine learning. Businesses using Confirmit’s solutions can map and connect feedback and data sources, drive smarter decisions, and enable faster reactions. Most importantly, they can monitor the impact of action taken and help determine ROI. Two key technologies that help businesses see success include Confirmit Concept Miner and Confirmit Action Planner.

Concept Miner uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) and advanced deep learning techniques to ensure quick and easy understanding of key insights that may be hidden within text data. Action Planner empowers companies to track and monitor the impact of initiatives on business results and drive viral change.

These tools give every team member access to insight that informs smart decisions – and ensures everyone can see the impact of them – uncovering new best practices and avoiding repeat mistakes.

Michael Wooh, Chief Marketing Officer at Confirmit, said the team was “delighted” at the win.

“Over the past few years, we’ve seen a shift from companies focusing on collecting data to a focus on connecting data and really using it – which is what Business Intelligence is all about,” she told Customer Experience Magazine.

“Confirmit is dedicated to democratising insight – putting it in the hands of people who can use it to maximise impact and ROI.

“Most importantly, enabling people to make better decisions. It’s great to be recognised for our latest innovations and to be able to demonstrate that our solutions really drive tangible business outcomes.”

Confirmit Director Philip Durand was a judge at the 2018 UK Customer Experience Awards, and entries for the 2019 event in London on October 10 are now open, across 24 categories.

 




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