Richard WillisRichard WillisMarch 25, 2019
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7min83

According to Forrester, over the next five years western European online retail sales will grow at over three times the rate of total retail sales.

What’s driving this growth?

It comes as no surprise that consumers’ adoption of digital devices, particularly smartphones, plays a substantial role. With Forrester estimating that 84 percent of online adults in the UK, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain use smartphones, always-connected consumers will continue to drive online retail sales across Europe.

But when it comes to ‘m-commerce’ – with the purchase actually being transacted on a mobile device – its promises always seem to lie just around the corner. For a number of years we’ve seen retail predictions that this is the year for mobile, but has it ever really come true? And will 2019 be any different?

At the risk of joining in with the crystal ball gazing, 2019 may mark a watershed in mobile retail – but only if retailers can seize the opportunity that is now on offer.

The mobile opportunity

No one claims that mobile will surpass other retail channels in terms of conversions in the foreseeable future. In-store, where consumers can examine items and talk to knowledgeable sales assistants, still provides a unique experience and should never be compromised; meanwhile, traditional online retail presents the shopper with enormous choice on an easily viewed browser.

But mobile does have a key role to play in shoppers’ experience. Whilst our recent research showed 11 percent of UK shoppers planned to use mobile as their preferred channel in the run-up to Christmas 2018, it also revealed that of those using mobile, almost 40 percent were using it to look for inspiration for gifts rather than make the actual purchase.

We also found that just under a third of shoppers planned to use mobiles to check online prices while in-store (the old ‘showrooming’ phenomenon). This insight is supported by figures from Deloitte’s annual UK mobile consumer survey, which reveals the rising influence of smartphones on retail sales – including how 84 percent of millennials claim to use their phones for shopping assistance while in a store.

How to keep shoppers coming back

It’s clear that mobile is a large and increasingly important part of the Customer Experience journey. The challenge for retailers – and their great opportunity – is ensuring that the mobile experience is easy to navigate and consistently fantastic, whether shoppers are making purchases, looking for gift inspiration, or comparing prices.

Retailers might think that the best way to turn browsing into sales is by offering something that others don’t – and to some degree they’re right. But getting the basics correct counts for much more than a gimmick.

According to Forrester, smartphone-savvy consumers have high expectations for mobile experiences, with 61 percent of shoppers more likely to return to a website if it is mobile-friendly.

What steps can retailers take to ensure their mobile sites keep shoppers coming back?

For starters, m-commerce sites should be optimised for every device and mobile OS. Differences in screen size and resolution, button placement, or operating system can have a huge effect on the mobile experience. Retailers often claim that they optimise their websites for every device, but do they take into account the small factors which can have big consequences on the path to purchase?

One example is placing the checkout or ‘Buy Now’ button in the space where push notifications usually appear. This could lead to the user becoming distracted or accidentally clicking out of the purchase – perhaps a small problem but one which, multiplied by thousands of users, could severely affect sales.

Another key consideration is designing websites to be mobile-first. Many websites carry a large amount of content that is right for bigger screens, such as long blogs, videos, or interactive content. Mobile-first sites, on the other hand, need to be crisp, clear, uncluttered and easy to navigate, with visuals specifically designed for mobile devices.

Finally, we would urge retailers to think about devices holistically. M-commerce is about much more than buying something through your device’s browser. An effective strategy should embrace loyalty apps with a range of functions that optimises navigability, provides a variety of services, and boosts loyalty. This could include self-service options such as checking availability and setting up click-and-collect delivery options, or providing product reviews, social integration and single-click ordering.

By adopting a thorough m-commerce strategy, retailers have a unique opportunity to do much more than just operate another sales channel. Providing a great mobile experience will differentiate retailers in a crowded market and make them the first choice for the generations who were practically born with a mobile device in their hand, whilst also appealing to the masses that are always shopping. And, unlike many of the premature promises about mobile, this future is tantalisingly close.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMarch 21, 2019
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3min214

A new report has found that 20 percent of marketing and CX professionals feel they will “never truly understand” their customers’ buying decisions.

The study from analytics firm Clicktale, titled Defining Digital Experience, states that part of the reason for this is due to 34 percent of marketers and CX professionals being unable to unite data between their web and mobile-optimised sites to create a single customer view, while 39 percent struggle to unite data from their websites and mobile apps.

This inability, the report continues, also means that 71 percent of brands can’t action customer insights in real time, while 73 percent are struggling to provide a consistent experience across channels. Ultimately, this lack of ability to understand customers is hindering brands’ chances of securing customer loyalty and damaging potential sales.

The study explores the current state of digital with 200 marketing and CX professionals working in some of the world’s leading brands in the UK and the US. The report uncovers how brands are building a strategy around Digital Experience, including who is ‘owning’ the function, and what technology they’re deploying.

Clicktale CMO Sara Richter said: “With so many brands struggling to build a single customer view, is it any wonder that marketing and CX professionals feel they cannot build a true understanding of their customers?

“But while uniting data is undoubtedly key, so too is capturing the right kind of data – beyond the usual demography, geography, purchase history and preference. Very few brands are tapping into the power of behavioural data, which enriches the marketer’s understanding of the customer immensely. With behavioural data and the right analytics, brands can better serve customers, improve loyalty and drive more repeat revenue.”


Seb BurchellSeb BurchellFebruary 20, 2019
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6min448

Technological sophistication is all pointing towards one thing: reducing the requirement for human labour, and input.

But in the fintech industry, humans aren’t simply a necessity – they’re irreplaceable.

Human developers are obviously needed to write, and maintain code, as well as learning and understanding the products that make the code necessary. Say these processes eventually become automated, the need for humans would remain.

That’s partially due to the fact ‘build it and they will come’ isn’t applicable to the disruptive world of fintech. Even the most boisterous, compelling and revolutionary products need effective branding, marketing and PR teams that will help the product succeed. Particularly as we see the rise in the importance of search ranking, SEO professionals will also have an integral part to play in making their fintech visible in an increasingly competitive space.

Moreover, while technology drives many fintechs services, certain businesses need real-time human emotion to overcome unique challenges. For some enterprises, such as online mortgage brokers, they’re task is to convince consumers to change from traditional brokers to their banks or existing lenders. This is just one case in which human empathy can’t be replaced or simulated by technology.

Consumer attitudes

Understandably, customers can be hesitant to trust small, relatively unknown startups with their personal and financial data, especially if it involves one of the biggest financial decisions you can make.

Recent research conducted by TopLine Comms found a whopping 83 percent of respondents were ‘unsure’ of fintech companies and how they work. Insightfully, 27 percent ascribed a lack of understanding as the reason why they were unsure.

Consumers will only trust Fintech firms once they understand and address customers’ concerns, one pertinent method to educate and earn potential consumers trust is through marketing, communication and branding.

But that’s solely acquiring customers. Consumer experience is what turns a cynical user into a fully-fledged customer, and a hybrid approach that encumbers an equilibrium of tech and human interaction is likely to be the key to the best customers experiences in fintech.

For example, fintechs in the banking industry can use technological innovation to alleviate their human advisers from the arduous and time-consuming parts of the job. Now finance experts can spend more time sourcing the best advice for their customers and building a relationship that raises trust between both parties.

These relationships build advocacy, which can in turn convert others – offline and online word of mouth is undoubtedly one of the best methods of attracting new customers. Ninety-three percent of respondents in a recent survey by Podium said online reviews affected their decision to make a purchase or not.

Many people intend to use an online fintech, as opposed to a traditional service because they won’t have to deal with a human when liaising with the former. Often, customers aren’t too keen to talk about their own sensitive financial situations issues and said customers in these circumstances may prefer to not speak to an actual human. Entirely digital experiences, that use complex technological features such as Artificial intelligence in the form of Natural Language Processing (NLP) and machine learning, could be the best solution for them.

The truth is that both kinds of consumers exist – and so a hybrid model that uses tech and human interaction flexibly, to improve the Customer Experience may be the most pragmatic approach.

The future

As fintech moves into the mainstream, consumer attitudes may also move in a certain direction. The more sophisticated and accessible technology becomes, the more likely it is that people may start to feel less anxious about trusting new businesses with their data. The arrival and widespread adoption of Open Banking could be the catalyst to start this paradigm shift.

But in the meantime, fintechs must combat the dichotomous challenges of converting sceptical customers and making themselves stand out in a crowded marketplace. In both cases, humans will remain an integral and irreplaceable element to any fruitful fintech.




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