Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiApril 3, 2020
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3min280

According to a report compiled from results gathered by Revuze, 80 per cent of consumers have a positive sentiment towards SMART TV, while 20 per cent give neutral or negative reviews.

When customers are looking to buy a new SMART TV, there is a list of variables to consider before choosing the one that suits their needs. The topics that are most often associated with purchasing in this market are overall satisfaction, value for money, ease of use, picture quality and a few more.

Apart from the general topics that are usually associated with the previous generations of tv devices, customers are now considering three different main qualities before picking a SMART tv, and these are:

1. Applications

The primary feature which distinguishes Smart TVs in the market is its ability to connect to the Internet, enabling consumers to download apps and streaming services.

Consumers are mostly dissatisfied with the performance of applications on Smart TVs, saying that they often experience apps freezing, crashing, or not being updated regularly.

2. Voice recognition

This practical feature of Smart TVs allows users to access and navigate the menu of the tv device. While it was previously available on mobile phones and speakers, users are gladly using the feature to control and search for content even without the remote.

3. Smell

The one unexpected characteristic users include in their reviews is the smell, mostly in a negative tone. A number of reviewers mentioned the chemical smell of the plastic as a con after purchasing a Smart TV of one brand.

Although the topic of smell does not seem to have major importance in overall experience with Smart TV, it should not be completely disregarded.

 

Consumers are still buying Smart TVs because of their ever-improving picture quality, the smart feature – connection to the Internet, and ease of use, which accounts for stable growth in the recent years, amassing over 30 billion in the market revenue in the US alone in 2019.

 

Interested in reading the full report? Click here to download this and two other papers free of charge, but only for a limited time!


Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiApril 2, 2020
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3min427

A recent report published by Revuze, a no-touch analytics platform examines the possible issues in understanding your customers while offering a self-service solution that solves it all.

Customer insights require time, effort and maintenance since all customer data today is gathered through some type of AI programme. Big organisations demand effective solutions.

Here are the three main signs that show you may be in need of a self-service customer solution:

1. Guessing all the sources and ways consumers talk about a service or a product

Data is not always easy to spot since consumers have a long list of topics linked to a product or a service. While consumers are still talking about your product, it can be expressed in so many different ways that it requires familiarising with the updated trends and even new phrases.

2. Long processing time

Dealing with consumer insights may take longer than we want it to be, having in mind that the pace at which businesses operate is not going any slower. This requires manual configuration and tuning which in turn takes a long time to process all the necessary data.

3. Consumers are looking for more

Consumers today are more demanding than before when it comes to choosing a product or a service. The number of aspects they consider before choosing is great than one might think, needless to say that not every customer values the same things in a product or a service. In reality, customer insights should be based on more than five to ten variables.

If any of these signs are present in your business, a self-service solution would take care of automation, access to different types of insights and the data is available to a larger number of roles in the organisation.

To see the complete report, along with two other papers from Revuze, free download is available for a limited time here.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 27, 2020
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3min1424

All of a sudden, the whole world is focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, and that includes your customers. Should you review and change your customer experience (CX) efforts in response? Yes. Many of the specifics vary by industry, but here are the three essential things that every company needs to focus on.

1. Start With Empathy — Understand Your Customers In This Moment

Surveys alone are not enough and will not give you the right information — especially not in this situation. To build the customer understanding required, you should:

  • Invest in having live conversations with customers now.
  • Get your research professionals onto customer service calls.
  • Proactively reach out to customers.
  • Respond with concrete steps.

 

2. Adapt Your CX Accordingly

Some parts of the experiences you’ve been delivering may have been perfect a few weeks ago but could be all wrong now:

  • Critically review the current experiences you are delivering.
  • Do the same with planned experiences.
  • Hit the pause button where needed.
  • Prioritize simplicity and clarity more than ever.

 

3. Help Your Employees Deliver Great CX Despite The Crisis

They might be frontline staff taking calls from anxious customers. They might be IT staff working around the clock to help the entire workforce be productive from home as companies ask staff to stay away from offices and work remotely. Whatever their role in your company, this is a unique moment for them as the human embodiment of your brand:

  • Employees face uncertainty and anxiety, too.
  • Customers in crisis drive up the stress level for employees
  • Invest in improving employees’ well-being — it will improve CX.

 

This article was originally posted on Forrester  and written by David Troug.

 

If you’d like to read more about these three essentials and you’re a Forrester client, see Improve Customer Experience In Response To The Coronavirus Pandemic.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 25, 2020
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3min707

In partnership with world-renowned CX specialist Ian Golding, we have an exciting announcement to make. 

Ian will be running a series of Online Masterclasses, giving you CX tips of the highest quality, all from the comfort of your own home! 

The two-day course will cover all the core CX competencies:

  • CX Strategy
  • Brand proposition
  • The role of employees in delivering the strategy
  • Customer journey mapping
  • CX measurement (VOC, VOE and VOP)
  • CX improvement
  • CX culture

For those taking the CCXP exam, there is the option of staying another day for an Exam Preparation Workshop, where you will receive advice on exam technique and any problem areas you might have. 

Ian is offering Online Masterclasses in three different time zones: BST, PST and EDT. These classes take place on different days, so find out which one is best for you

The next class will be for the UK timezone, and will be taking place on 6th and 7th April. Book your place now!

For those in the Benelux region, CCXP experts Marleen van Wijk and Gayana Helder will be sharing their CX knowledge. They are running two online courses, the first of which is on 14th and 15th May, with a further class held in June. These classes will be held in the Dutch language – find out more!

We’re also looking forward to launching Online Masterclasses in the Gulf and Singapore time zones – so watch this space.

If you’re currently working from home full-time, this is the perfect opportunity to sharpen your CX knowledge before returning to the office. We hope you can join us! 

 


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8min958

Well actually no!  We must remember that Net Promoter Score or NPS for short is one of the forefathers of today’s short, intelligent and low effort surveys.  Without which, many businesses would still be struggling to embed the importance of customer feedback in their organisations. The sheer simplicity of NPS meant that from C-Suite to Store the entire organisation could understand how the score was calculated.  Board of directors love a number to chase – but I will get to that later.

For those who are not familiar with NPS; way back in the last millennium, during 1993, Fred Reichheld with Rob Markey developed the Net Promoter Score by sending 20 distinct questionnaires out to thousands of customers in different industries. He and his research team found that one question stood out when correlated with propensity to buy and the advocacy behaviour of those customers.  In 2003 both Bain & Company and Satmetrix adopted the measurement as a way to predict customer loyalty and the rest is, as they say, history!

The Question itself is: “How Likely is it you would recommend us to a friend?” *

However, it was not the question but the way in which the response was captured and the score calculated, which was revolutionary. By understanding customer behaviour when presented with a scaled response; NPS tackles the human tendency to be more outwardly positive; where a respondent may rate differently to the way they might actually feel. Whilst Reichheld identified that respondents could be grouped into 3 categories, Detractors, Passives and Promoters these were not evenly distributed.  The scale is significant, and the use of an 11point scale from 0-10 is built around this behavioural psychology:

Detractors – customers who gave a score of 0-6 are considered dissatisfied with your company and are more likely to discourage others not to use your brand’s products or services.

Passives – those who scored 7-8 are actually considered as passive.  They are neither unhappy or particularly happy with their experience, but are unlikely to proactively promote your brand.

Promoters – those who scored 9 or 10 are likely to actively recommend your brand to others.

The score is then calculated by taking the percentage of respondents who give a 9 and 10 “the promoters” and then subtracting the percentage of respondents who give a response of 0-6 “the detractors”. Passive responders are not used in the calculation. This generates a score ranging from -100 to +100, which is the Net Promoter Score.

A modern conundrum!

Companies use the score to measure individuals – which is a problem!  As a result, for many organisations NPS fails to provide a clear or obvious route to action – and it never will! It was not designed, according to Fred Reichheld’s ‘The Ultimate Question’, as a measure of an individual employee but as a benchmarking tool for loyalty to a company/brand.

As a result, it is hard to link NPS to a direct improvement in performance; yet it is so often linked to performance KPI’s for employees – there are of course other measures to measure staff performance. But, by creating a target nobody can wholly or materially control, it has often had a negative effect when used to measure employee performance.

The inclusion of such measures in employee balance scorecards has driven the need to re-purpose NPS into something is wasn’t designed to do.

The ease of NPS was that it was a standard question, to be asked in the same way, with the same scoring mechanic, irrespective of industry, sector or customer type. However, the need for businesses to link the measure to a tangible outcome has meant many re-incarnations of the question text to a point where it has a materially different impact on the response.  Whilst still using the 11-point scale and scoring mechanic or even going as far as representing the score as a percentage. Shock Horror!

 

OMG! I have seen some surveys apply the 11-point scale to every question in the questionnaire; to which any knowing respondent will constantly score 7, just to pass the time and antagonize the poor researcher trying to find that one nugget of insight in the melé of drivel collected!

 

Simple light touch surveys do help identify the proverbial ‘Wood from the trees’ but in many ways the use of structured questionnaires with pre-coded responses restricts the measurement and the survey simply delivers the expected result.

However, no matter how poorly the use of NPS across voice of customer programs has been applied, the intention of finding a measure which helps organisations understand, and improve, their customer’s experience is a huge positive.

The methodology has evolved into more practical applications of the metric such as Net Easy, Customer Effort Score and Net Satisfaction to name a few and this re-purposing of the question has undoubtedly had a positive influence on how companies respond to customer feedback.

The use of voice and video capture is now enabling true sentiment and emotion to be shared as part of the feedback.  This might shorten the time it takes to respond meaningfully, but unless the right technical solution is used, can mean the interpretation of comments is more difficult; essentially, businesses will always crave hard and quantifiable numbers.

Appreciate NPS for what it is intended to be and optimize its potential. NPS is absolutely not the root cause of the issues in customer measurement, but its misinterpretation and misuse has tarnished its own, once shiny, reputation. Used well, in line with its original instructions, NPS allows businesses to benchmark themselves against both direct competition and other sectors/industries in a way no other measurement can. Helping identify the best and poorest perceived customer experiences was its raison d’etre and properly implemented can still deliver when measuring the impact of brand loyalty.

 

For further reading about NPS:

* Net Promoter, NPS, and the NPS-related emoticons are registered trademarks, and Net Promoter Score and Net Promoter System are service marks, of Bain & Company, Inc., Satmetrix Systems, Inc. and Fred Reichheld.


Claire BonniolClaire BonniolMarch 13, 2020
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7min1173

‘Poor Customer Experience’ is costing financial institutions $10 billion in revenue per year, a figure that was revealed in 2019 by a Fenergo research.

In the context of a troubled economic environment, cost wars, and a need for transparency, it is more than necessary that financial services seriously look at a drastic customer centricity shift to stay in the competition.

Why are financial services late with CX transformation?

Investments banks don’t go the same way as their retail counterparts. 

Retail banks made their CX transformation a decade ago, trying to transform their services from pure transaction to advisory. Digital services have reduced the need to go to a branch for simple operations or meet bank employees in-person.

Until recently, investment banks could differentiate through the quality, accuracy, and innovation of their financial products. Their clients used to be loyal to one or two providers only, and trust came from the expertise of brokers and staff. But this is no longer the case and clients have become much more volatile.

There are two main reasons why high-end B2B environments are often late in CX transformation. Firstly, they like to create bespoke services per client, and fear that they would lose a good long-term customer relationship if they design journeys per customer segment.

Secondly, it is not natural for key account managers to put a value on systems rather than on their own industry or product expertise, which brings internal resistance.

What is the impact of providing a low Customer Experience?

Small and bigger customers benefit from a large range of product offers and potential providers, and can get self-care through many fintech services. Providing a low Customer Experience therefore can have a huge negative impact.

To give some examples, the onboarding time remains too much of a burden for many customers. The consequence is that they prefer to look for other partners who would provide quicker processes: 36 percent of customers leave due to a slow or inefficient onboarding, according to Fenergo.

The same impact would be faced on revenues (customers spend less when CX is poor), customer retention (they leave more often, which results in a higher new customer acquisition cost), or even employee engagement (many major investment banks such as Goldman Sachs invest in employee engagement programmes).

What can digital bring to an improved Customer Experience?

The booming development of fintech has set the scene for new digital services. Many customer pain points can be solved thanks to digital innovation. Checks and KYC make the onboarding a lot quicker and smoother.

Research and financial information become broader, more efficient, and cheaper. Information is key to be the first in proposing good investment, and everything that can accelerate the research becomes a differentiator. Gathering and analysing the data from your existing customers is also a huge help to improve the services and predict customer behaviours. Technology with platforms such as Qualtrics or Medallia have become as important as CRMs or accountancy software. To give a last example, customers want to have access to self-care apps because it quickens the simple operations processes…

These are just a few examples of how technology can improve CX. Solutions have developed very rapidly and have become a must in financial services packages. 

What needs to be done on the human side?

Fintechs have changed the way investment banks can deliver valuable services and continue to create money and jobs.

It’s now time to prepare the organisation for this new world. The job has changed and will continue to change. So, how to cope with this transformation?

Putting CX transformation in place is not just about bringing digital tools into the customer journey. Customers need personalisation, the sentiment of being treated like a VIP, efficiency, self-care, and a high level of ‘human touch’ when they want it.

With my 20 years of experience in the field, I can argue that customer centricity is first and primarily an ability to behave with care. There is a specific skillset for customer culture that has to be transmitted to the frontline, back-office staff, managers, and internal coaches, and that is not common at all in investment bank environments.

In addition to this skillset, CX transformation programmes have to be put in place, to set the strategy, establish the data management, design bespoke journeys to wow customers and staff, and train and monitor.

Is your organisation already on the way? You can check where you are in the transformation CX path with this free assessment tool: DiagnostiX.co.uk.


Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiMarch 12, 2020
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2min926

New research has shown that the UK gift card market industry has reached £6.9 billion in value.

A study conducted by the Gift Card & Voucher Association (GCVA) involving 2,000 UK consumers shows a rising awareness around sustainability, as digital gift cards increase in popularity, making up more than a third (36 percent) of the overall B2C gift card market.

The Valuing the Gift Card Industry 2020 survey found Generation X make up the majority of gift card consumers at 37.7 percent, while baby boomers come a close second at 37.1 percent. Younger consumers (age 16-34) make up a modest 25.1 percent of the gift card market.

The most popular type of gift cards are for retail, with over 60 percent of total purchasing expenditure (2.8 billion pounds). The use of multi-store gift cards has also increased in popularity, taking just over 17 percent of consumer gift card expenditure.

The research was conducted in partnership with GlobalData, which predicts that the gift card industry will be worth around 8 billion pounds by 2025.

Gail Cohen, Director General of the GCVA, said: “Gift cards are an invaluable customer loyalty and engagement tool that hold many benefits for businesses and consumers alike, and it’s fantastic to see their contribution properly recognised.

“If this latest research shows anything, it’s that retailers and other businesses looking to attract and retain customers simply cannot ignore gift cards any longer, with their importance and relevance to consumers only growing over time.”


Greg HeistGreg HeistMarch 11, 2020
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6min869

Retailers today face an interesting challenge – and competitive opportunity – brought on by the growing customer demand for personalised products, recommendations, and experiences.

To successfully achieve this personalisation, the delivery process for brands involves a necessary exchange, one that can be notably problematic if not handled properly.

Many consumers are prepared to take part in this exchange – relinquishing their personal information in order to receive desired commodities (tangible or intangible). But brands must also take responsibility for negotiating this as a ‘fair value exchange’ by gaining trust and maintaining customer security, in order to be successful.

How generation plays in

As Customer Experience professionals studying this increase in demand for hyper-personalisation closely, it is clear to us that there is a generational factor at play.

A recent Gongos survey of participants across the millennial, Gen X, and baby boomer generations found that over half of millennial consumers were willing to share their fingerprints and facial details with retailers if it meant:

  • a more convenient experience (55 percent)
  • customised products and services (55 percent)
  • real-time promotions (52 percent)

Comparatively, Gen X and baby boomers reported lower numbers in all three of these delivery methods, with boomer willingness never exceeding 20 percent.

The opportunity for brands

The openness of consumers to give away highly sensitive personal data indicates a strong desire for personalisation and a very powerful opportunity for brands.

As consumer expectations for tailored treatment continue to escalate, the increased value of personal data also becomes evident. Possible delivery methods to personalisation include products and services, but also experiences and promotions.

While the above data offers a fairly balanced representation of the different delivery methods desired by Millennial consumers, the growing desire for experience alone (especially compared to their older counterparts) has been well documented.

The risk

This vast opportunity for companies today is not something to be taken for granted, given the high risk of compromising consumers’ information, and subsequently their trust.

Looking back at massive data breaches like Facebook and Target, it makes sense that consumer confidence has become more guarded in recent years. Brands simultaneously hold the ability to build and destroy their customers’ trust, and it is essential for them to understand this in order to have successful customer relationships.

These bonds can require years of positive actions to be cultivated, and sometimes only a single incorrect action occurring in a short time period can harm or neutralise trust.

 The need for authenticity

Customer sentiment today (particularly among millennials) highlights the strategic imperative for retailers to authentically deliver personalisation to their customers, and in a time-sensitive manner.

Maintaining that flow of information will require brands to respond, not only through the creation of tailored deliverables, but through accountability for how they choose to earn and cultivate consumer trust.

The takeaway

It often helps for marketers to understand that personalisation is not always linear. Correctly pinpointing the forms that provide the most value to consumers is an ongoing process.

Brands should also remember that implementing and continually fostering a type of ‘fair value exchange’ with consumers is generally necessary to ensure their survival.

If personalisation is done effectively and in a trustworthy manner, brands can look forward to long-term positive results such as stronger loyalty, deeper engagement, and meaningful growth.


Edwin BestEdwin BestMarch 6, 2020
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16min1017

This article is co-authored by Edwin Best (below left), founder of The Best CRM, and Joost Kerkhofs (right), an entrepreneur and author specialising in Organisational Behavior Management (OBM), and the co-founder of OBM Dynamics, which offers globally recognised certification in OBM in association with APMG International.

                        

 

Once upon a time, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) was a business strategy for building long-term relationships.

It was a strategy based on customer life-cycle management – the process of acquiring, onboarding, engagement and retaining customers.

Nowadays, CRM is – mostly – perceived as technology for the automation of customer processes. CRM technology, though important, is just a means to an end: building mutual beneficial long-term relationships.

This CRM perception is one of the reasons that the technology part is often leading the way in CRM projects. As a consequence, neither the management that wants CRM, nor the people involved in the implementation, are paying attention to the most important part: the CRM strategy and the related change management.

What kinds of behaviours are needed from employees that are working with the technology being implemented?

Customer Experience and CRM

Due the rapidly changing demands of customer (and employee) needs, in the last decade CX has emerged and become the competitive advantage in business.

Putting the customer and employee needs at the centre of a business is necessary to survive in this fast-changing, highly demanding world. CX requires a fundamental shift in thinking – instead of ‘inside out’ (CRM), it requires an ‘outside-in’ approach.

This is the perception you leave with your customer, resulting in how they think of your brand across every stage of the customer journey.

For traditional – silo – organised B2B companies, the change towards an outside-in approach requires a fundamental, long-term change in leadership and culture. But here also, the question remains – what kind of behaviours are needed from the workforce in order for this approach to become successful?

Best of both worlds

In B2B environments, we face two different worlds – the CRM (technology) world and the CX world.

In fact, they are separated worlds.

I look at CRM as the ‘cold’ world (technology, processes, data), while CX is the ‘warm’ world (collaboration, passion, and values).

Both worlds need each other. CRM for the digitalisation of customer processes and for the interaction with all touchpoints.

For Voice of the Customer and customer insights, CX needs CRM data.

Modern CRM systems collect the required CX data (e.g. data from the different touchpoints and CX metrics). This interaction reflects also both the customer and employee happiness: the CRM concepts are designed to make things as easy and convenient as possible during the different customer and employee journeys.

So, how do you integrate both worlds?

In my management book on customer-centric business, I use the below framework for an integrated CRM and CX approach.

The different rows:

CRM

  • CRM foundation: CRM technology for the automation of sales, marketing, and service processes
  • CRM strategies (e.g. a customer contact strategy)

Customer Experience

  • Customer Experience strategies (e.g. internal branding)
  • The red diamond, collaborating with the customer as the connecting perspective
  • Outside-in approach based upon customer journeys and touchpoints

Vision and strategy

Your tailor-made  (related to your industry, needs, developments) customer-centric vision and strategy.

A mix with CRM and CX elements and other value-based elements. E.g. for a flexible organisation working with the Scaled Agile Framework (SAF), an integrated approach with Agile and Lean principals.

The strategy includes clear employee and customer metrics to measure the results and progress. The strategy is related to the overall mission, vision and strategy, the umbrella for all activities.

CRM/CX marriage with Organisational Behaviour Management (OBM)

Although the above approach is attractive, creating an organisation with involved employees and customers, the question remains: how do you make sure the people that you want using the new CRM way of working actually show the behaviours needed to make it a successful strategy?

Depending of the strategy, this often means an intensive change. With just CRM, a new way of working with a new system is needed.

With CX, a change in culture and leadership needs to be accomplished.

However, in both cases the new behaviours needed to make the strategy work are not necessarily already part of the habits and routines of your workforce.

In fact, announcing and implementing new ways of working may be the shortest route to generating resistance from your employees. Before you know it, multi-million investments in CRM and/or CX are written off because people don’t use or do it as prescribed, and the frustrated organisation is left with a culture of fear and a ‘do it or else’ style of leadership.

Why is that, and what exactly can we do about it?

Well, this is something a lot of both businesspeople and scientists have been wondering about, probably since the very beginning of business and commerce. So it’s not something that limited to CRM/CX implementation.

According to McKinsey & Co, a mere 30 percent of change programs in businesses around the world seem to succeed. And interestingly enough, “behaviour” is always found in the top three reasons for failure of the program, leaving management wondering: “Why don’t they do what we asked them to do? Can’t they see the beauty and logic of the strategy?”

Actually, a lot of people can see the beauty and logic, but it doesn’t necessarily change their behaviours and turn them into new habits. You only have to take a look at the success rates of New Year’s resolutions to know what point we’re trying to make here.

Habits are formed in a specific way, and it turns out only a few people in business have learned how that actually works (neurologically) and what to do to get people to form new habits in favour of the strategy.

The short version on turning your strategy into a success is: the right application of the dopamine effect in business operations.

We know from decades of scientific research that people do what they do because of what happens to them when they do it. We’re talking about the right consequences to the performer here when the desired behaviours are actually shown. If you make it worthwhile to the performer, you will increase the likelihood of the behaviour returning and increasing, eventually even turning into a habit.

It is called positive reinforcement and its powers are poorly understood and often applied incorrectly.

Because of several pitfalls in influencing behaviour, a mere 0.8 percent of time, effort, and resources are spent on the dopamine effect in business operations.

Yet we all are very aware that dopamine does the trick, but perhaps without necessarily knowing about its existence.

Just take a look at the huge successes of the gaming industry, social media, and the technologies coming out of Silicon Valley.

These products and services all create the right dopamine effect in consumer brains all over the globe, changing the habits of billions of people in only a short period of time, turning them into players, authors, and artists, prompting them to do different things than they did before.

There’s even a ‘Habit Summit’ held in San Francisco every year, where scientists and others from Silicon Valley meet to present and discuss the latest and most effective ways of influencing our habits as consumers.

Our point is this – we can use the same power of habit forming to our advantage in creating new successful working habits, hugely increasing the probabilities of success of our CRM/CX strategy, or any business strategy for that matter.

The trick is to accept that it’s not a zero-sum game. You have to see things from the performer’s perspective and synergize – a point the late Stephen Covey was trying to make all along in his book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.

Luckily a part of management science that is putting the dopamine-effect to good use within organisations is getting more and more attention these days. That’s because scientists seem to have found a way to truly change behaviours and create sustainable productive habits by using this effect as part of an intervention protocol.

It is called Organisational Behaviour Management (or OBM for short) and we suggest its integration to change programs aiming for CRM and/or CX success.

Perhaps being the best-kept secret in change management, OBM is now rapidly becoming more popular, mostly because it is both very practical for leaders and consultants, and has been scientifically validated in thousands of studies.

We hope to have sparked your interest in it, and would strongly suggest you check out this science before you venture into a new CRM/CX change program.


Jason HemingwayJason HemingwayMarch 6, 2020
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10min661

Customer-centricity has been the CX and marketing industry promise of the past decade.

It has been hailed as the crucial ingredient to generating lasting loyalty because it is a fundamental shift in the way businesses view their customers, and indeed how they behave towards them. Essentially, it puts the customer at the very heart of the organisation and allows marketers and CX professionals to respond to their feedback, behaviour, and expectations accordingly.

So, where are we as an industry when it comes to delivering on this? Ultimately, customer lifetime value will be the real measure of success here – and according to new research from Isobar, the industry is lagging behind, as it is revealed almost half of marketers (46 percent) are struggling to meet growing consumer expectations.

Research we carried out at Thunderhead suggests marketers are in denial about the scale of the problem – we found 94 percent of consumers are frustrated by disjointed experiences. Clearly ‘customer-centricity’ is on the agenda, but few businesses are able to back up their efforts with genuine action.

Before we go any further, we need to reset on what it truly means to be customer-centric.

Organisations should consider moving away from viewing their customers as clicks and conversions, and start thinking about them as unique, with their own needs and preferences. Only by understanding customers on an individual level can marketers really build engagement and provide the most tailored, relevant and contextually aware content, utilising already-demonstrated intent to meet customer expectations.

So, what can organisations do to truly embrace customer centricity?

Here are three tips to help get started…

1. It’s not about more data, it’s about the data you already have

Data is an enabler and you probably already have too much. 

Behavioural insights, based on millions of touchpoints, can tell organisations who their customers are, what they want, and what their likely next move is. And the beauty of it is that the majority of organisations already have all of this at their fingertips.

The issue and reality, however, is that most marketers and CX professionals are drowning in the data. The consequences of marketers struggling and trying to make sense of it all can be paralysing.

Marketing teams and CX professionals can improve efficiency and drive greater customer engagement by using technology such as AI and machine learning to use data intelligently at scale. Technology provides a vital role in generating a clear real time view of each customer interacting with a brand. 

Moreover, marrying this together with a layer of context is a crucial piece of the puzzle. This will enable businesses to really harness true customer intent and inform future experiences with greater precision.  

Ultimately, demonstrating a clear understanding of who a customer is will be the foundation of a lasting relationship. Failing that could have drastic consequences, as almost nine-in-10 customers (87 percent) admitted to negatively perceiving a company that sends them information which lacks understanding of them as individuals and their unique context.

2. Connecting the omnichannel dots

When we talk about connecting the millions of consumer touchpoints, this needs to be all-encompassing.

Gone are the days that consumers might use one or two devices to interact with a brand. Nowadays, a customer’s journey might start on mobile while on the morning commute, switch to desktop once they get to the office, and then be picked up via a tablet device when relaxing at home in the evening.

They may even pop into a store at the weekend or make a call to the call centre.  

 Above all, consumers expect to be able to pick up where they left off, for the experience to be easy and to feel ‘known’. So, marketers and CX professionals need to be savvy when it comes to joining together these activities and behaviours. 

The industry needs to move away from ‘multichannel’, to instead be thinking about how best to implement ‘omnichannel’ approach. If an organisation’s strategy doesn’t consider the entire customer journey and the touchpoints traversed, their profile of each customer will likely be incomplete.

So much so, marketers and CX professionals could be missing key signals that are the difference between keeping a customer or not. 

If that’s the case, it’s time for a rethink. 

A true omnichannel strategy connects every bit of customer behaviour and context, however big or small, digital or physical. This is a huge factor in orchestrating customer journeys and understanding where the intent lies. And while omnichannel understanding isn’t immediate, connecting two channels is the starting point and the route to improved Customer Experience. Adding new channels is the correct long-term strategy, and becoming fully omnichannel need not be daunting.

3. Building a long-term approach

The biggest mistake a business can make is to focus these efforts only on campaigns. Or worse still, throwing out the rulebook at specific seasonal moments.

Think of Black Friday.

A brand has spent months getting to know a customer and building a delicate relationship, but in a moment of mass marketing, hounds them with irrelevant offers to shift products. It’s not customer-centric, it’s brand-centric. True customer-centricity is always-on, not a sporadic, part-time bolt-on.

Harnessing existing data and making sense of real-time behaviours over time will equip marketers and CX professionals with the insights they need to provide individual, richer experiences that have far more value than one day of discounts.

However, we mustn’t be blind to the fact that data has a short shelf life, as described by Forrester’s Mike Gualteri as “perishable insights”.

Collecting data is not a tick-box exercise, and professionals cannot sit back thinking the job is done, or that they have ‘enough’ data. Existing customer insights expire as soon as that same customer clicks, browses, or visits again, and again. Adaptive, real-time insights are key.

While this may all seem like a complex process, in actual fact, it’s easier than most organisations think. Journey orchestration is the answer. Orchestrating the appropriate response for an individual based on real-time insight and understanding intent, then delivering what the customer needs in the moment, is what helps brands stand apart from the competition and what sets them up for longer form success. 


Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiMarch 5, 2020
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2min792

UK cosmetics chain Lush is inviting people to wash their hands in their stores even if they are not shopping, to help hinder the spread of coronavirus.

The move comes amid calls for an increase in public hand washing stations, with UK firm Protecting.co.uk warning that shops, libraries, and restaurants should offer more facilities to clean hands and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Protecting.co.uk spokesman Mark Hall said face masks were “pretty useless” in preventing the spread of the virus, and said thorough hand washing was the main step the public can take.

We all know the basics, wash your hands when you’ve used the toilet, wash them before you eat, but that’s just simply not enough in a virus emergency,” he said.

You need to make sure you are washing your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing. Your hands are a breeding ground for germs, washing them regularly will stop you from spreading bacteria to other people and all over surfaces such as door handles and bannisters.

At the end of the day, an alcohol-based hand rub will do the trick in a pinch, but nothing beats a good old-fashioned scrub with soap and water  and we need more places to do this.”


Sandra RadlovackiSandra RadlovackiMarch 3, 2020
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4min1017

Brands are failing to engage younger generations with their loyalty programmes, according to a new whitepaper.

A report by Mando-Connect and YouGov reveals that while 76 percent of British people are currently members of loyalty programmes, some 44 percent of men aged 18-24 don’t use them at all, and 33 percent of women aged 18-24 don’t either.

The research shows that 18-24s do like the idea of loyalty programmes (79 percent think they are a great way for brands and businesses to reward their customers) but problems such as not tailoring to their needs, not addressing social purpose and sustainability well, not enabling recommendation, not offering good enough value, and not being in the right digital or social channels hold loyalty programmes back.

Turned off: Loyalty programmes are failing to attract younger customers

Although rewards are still the number one thing that people consider most important in loyalty schemes (65 percent of 18-24s think rewards are important), marketers aren’t getting rewards right for 18-24s. 

Relevance, value, appeal, variety, and excitement are listed as the main drivers that will build loyalty. People want to feel savvy and that they have received a better deal than their peers.

They also want to feel they have been treated, and they want to help others. Twenty-eight percent of Brits want loyalty rewards to be something that helps others, such as giving to charity or helping an environmental cause.

Charlie Hills, Managing Director and Head of Strategy at Mando-Connect said: “The report shows that, whilst the Brits are major fans of loyalty programmes, the industry is failing to engage the 18-24 year old audience.

“Rewards are the most important factor for Brits in loyalty programmes. Loyalty marketers need to sit up, take notice and understand what people really want. What people really want from loyalty programme is great rewards.”

Sam Tatam of Ogilvy UK’s Behavioural Science team believes the best way for brands to engage younger audiences is to think differently about motivation and reward.

“While the research shows discounts play an important role in driving loyalty, we shouldn’t neglect the range of psychological levers available to us,” he said.

“Relying too much on finite or rational incentives doesn’t just force tough economic decisions for brands, they also limit our creative freedom. By better understanding the additional ways of creating ‘psychological value’, arguably an infinite resource, we can work to complement these initiatives.”

 


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMarch 2, 2020
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3min679

Midlands-based CX consultant and author Naeem Arif has been accepted into the Forbes Business Council, a growth and networking organisation for successful business owners and leaders worldwide.

The founder of NA Consulting and Director of United Carpets, Naeem was vetted and selected by a review committee based on the depth and diversity of his experience in the retail and Customer Experience sectors.

Criteria for acceptance includes a track record of successfully impacting business growth metrics, as well as personal and professional achievements and honours.

As an accepted member of the Council, Naeem has access to a variety of exclusive opportunities designed to help him reach peak professional influence.

He will connect and collaborate with other local leaders in a private forum and at members-only events, offer his expert insights in original business articles on Forbes.com, and contribute to published Q&A panels alongside other experts.

Scott Gerber, founder of Forbes Councils, the collective that includes Forbes Business Council, said: “We are honoured to welcome Naeem into the community. Our mission with Forbes Councils is to bring together proven leaders from every industry, creating a curated, social capital-driven network that helps every member grow professionally and make an even greater impact on the business world.”

Speaking of his new appointment, Naeem said: “There are a lot of great innovations and stories happening in our region that should be shared on the world stage and this is my chance to make that happen.

“When I was first interviewed, I didn’t expect this honour, but now I can’t wait for my first articles to be shared.”

Join Naeem Arif and fellow CX experts for the upcoming Unlock Your #CX Potential conference on March 25. The conference is hosted by the the Midlands Retail Forum, and will see delegates gather at the Jaguar Experience Conference Centre for a day of workshops, keynote speeches, and networking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamMarch 2, 2020
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2min649

CRM software specialists Freshworks is bringing together a community of experts in Customer Experience and IT solutions for an incredible one-day online summit.

The Refresh Connect summit is set to take place on March 12 and will feature speakers from across the globe discussing CX and tech solutions to boost business growth. The virtual gathering is being held to celebrate the launch of the new Freshworks Community – a unified platform for all content centred around CX, ITSM, sales, and marketing.

Leading the speakers on the day is Freshworks founder and CEO Girish Mathrubootham (pictured), who will be joined by a line-up including Diane Magers, founder of Experience Catalysts; Nate Brown, founder of CX Accelerator; Charles Betz, Principal Analyst at Forrester, and many more.

Master the art of delivering delightful experiences to your customers across every channel— consistently. Tap into actionable insights starting from building your CX team to keeping your customers for life.

Click here to register for Freshworks’ Refresh Connect summit.


Duncan KeeneDuncan KeeneMarch 2, 2020
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8min998

Not too long ago the customer journey was fairly simple to track and evaluate.

There were a limited number of channels for customers to browse or make purchases via. Nowadays, the utilisation of smart tools that make the customer’s journey easier, coupled with the fact that purchasing is no longer a one-size-fits-all experience, means more and more retailers are waking up to the need to up their customer journey mapping game.

Limitations of traditional analytics tools

Developing a core understanding of the people who matter most to your business is at the root of delivering remarkable Customer Experience, so user experience (UX) analytics is perhaps the most important technology for all retail brands to adopt, if they have not done so already, as it identifies why visitors behave in the way that they do.

To the point: Common errors can often render customer journey maps ineffective

Being able to not only identify where visitors are struggling on your site but why is essential, so using traditional web analytics tools like Google Analytics and Adobe Analytics to answer this question is like using a fork to eat soup.

While retailers may already have traditional analytics like Google and Adobe and a testing or personalisation tool in place, these systems are limited and simply not built for purpose in today’s environment. They may still be collecting information about clicks, bounces, and site exits, but they do not capture the UX insights needed to determine where your visitors are having issues, what pages they respond to most and why they are leaving/staying.

Rather than trying to run before they can walk, retailers should use UX analytics to gather all of the valuable actionable insights they can about their consumers’ experiences in order to make profitable changes to website layout, content, and images, etc.

Exploring personalisation, or at least customisation, without having a robust and in-depth overview of visitor behaviour is ineffective, which is why UX analytics is such a fast-growing marketplace in the retail technology sector. Thanks to real-time analytics that do not require a specialist to decipher, plus ease of use and simplicity of the data available, UX analytics is a good tool for customer journey mapping but there are still other common errors that can often render customer journey maps ineffective.

Here are six common errors that can make customer journey mapping fail:

1. Collaboration

Get your team and anyone who needs to know the results involved, so they are invested enough to ensure they implement customer-focused actions based on their insights too.

The customer journey includes interactions with many different areas and teams, so a joined-up approach means your customer journey map will include data and insights from all areas of the business.

2. Customers

Don’t forget to involve your customers.

It is them who will provide a depth of understanding. Different customers will have different journeys, so trying to reflect all of your customer segments in a single, generalised map could mean you miss important insights, and fail to make valuable customer experience improvements.

Try not to map every customer and every journey at once. Instead, focus on one at a time, done right, to put your insights into action successfully.

3. Data

While there are website behaviour tools that offer a vast sum of information, that is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the customer journey data available.

In addition to knowing how your customers journeyed across your website and the number of clicks they made on a hero product, it’s useful to go beyond that initial website data to also understand what they were trying to do that your site didn’t let them do and how frustrated that made them.

4. Guesswork

Don’t use assumptions to build your map rather than research and don’t structure your map according to your own brand’s internal process priorities, such as sales, only.

You’re after an insightful depiction of your customer’s journey, not your brand’s sales capabilities. No-one knows more about your customers than those customers themselves, so open up to what they’re trying to tell you, even if it differs from what you were expecting/planning for.

5. Touchpoints

Customer journey maps investigate every point of contact between a customer and your brand, so don’t forget to include touchpoints such as post-purchase engagement, which could cause damage if overlooked.

6. Completion

Customer journey maps are only as good as the actions they inform and the results their development and deployment drive, so don’t think of the map as being done.

It is now time to start making the changes needed, which is where the real work begins. Even when you think your customer journey map is complete, you’re still not done. Remember to allocate the time needed to make the changes.


Mike FantisMike FantisFebruary 25, 2020
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11min854

The start of 2020 brought yet more stories of doom and gloom on the high street.

While it’s relatively easy to identify the problems, the solutions are far less clear. Search for “high street decline” on Google News and you’ll discover a series of stories about uncoordinated campaigns to rejuvenate the in-store retail – from rumours the government will reduce business rates to calls for a digital sales tax.

Other stories feature local retailers clubbing together to offer discount days to entice customers back in to the area, while others call for ATMs to be made free to use.

In the rush to assign blame and broadcast top-down solutions, a quieter voice is often ignored. That is the actual voice of the customer. What kind of experiences are going to actually attract someone in store? Rather than a one-size-fits-all solution, how can retailers understand the local trends that are going to trigger a visit?

The positive news is that all the information needed to transform the high street’s fortunes is available thanks to the unprecedented digital signals being given by customers.

It’s time to listen to them.

Understand local environments

In today’s world, you are where you live. Your postcode is increasingly a more important determinant of behaviour than traditional demographics.

Each postcode location and audience segment has its own competitive landscape and decision-making triggers. Indeed, Google trends based on search engine history can reveal a rich tapestry of local behaviour and interests waiting to be uncovered, whether it’s a trend for meatless burgers in Margate or knitwear in Newark. Brands are fighting for the attention of potential customers but are ignoring these vital signals.

While retailers tear their hair out about internet businesses stealing market share, a crucial truth is missed. The internet is becoming increasingly mobile-driven with online searches driving our real-world behaviour.

In fact, 50 percent of all searches now carry local intent. This is someone saying they want to visit a physical manifestation of a brand. Yet despite this, most retailers will not be visible on key paid or organic search terms at the local level.

Tackle the basics

The fundamentals are actually very simple. When a potential customer searches for your business, you need to be both visible and accurate – nobody is loyal to a brand that offers up inaccurate opening hours or phone numbers that are never answered. 

Another key element of getting the basics right is to manage store reviews. Brands should show they care about the in-store experience. Crucial to this is answering reviews and solving issues.

Even more crucial is doing this rapidly. If someone walked into your shop to complain, you wouldn’t sit back with your arms folded, refusing to reply for a day. Although you can’t expect all reviews to be positive, at least by answering negative reviews in a timely fashion you demonstrate that you care about customer service.

A recent study by Google showed that 55 percent of millennials will ignore brands that don’t have visibility in search results or those with poor reviews. Even if millennials are not your current target audience, they will be at some point.

This reinforces the need for brands to change and meet expectations in an evolving space. Retailers are continuing to make the same mistakes or at least continuing to behave in the same way but are still questioning why performance is declining.

The content of Google reviews are clear signals on where brands are underperforming and underdelivering. You’ll notice that most store reviews relate to customer service, which in turn leads back to the store experience.

Tailor your approach

When brands want to generate interest, raise awareness, and encourage a visit to their store, are they speaking directly to their audience? In over 90 percent of instances, brands use blanket national messaging without considering the decision-making factors for each audience.

To grab the users’ attention, brands have to be relevant to them and add value – and that value can come in different shapes in sizes. Competitors can differ by location, parking can differ by location, economic factors are different by location, and the list goes on.

Add in different age groups for each location and, in some cases, the difference between male and female audiences. All of a sudden there are tens of campaigns needed for each location. Central marketing teams are not built in a way that can execute with such granularity. A truly local approach is needed.

Deliver on your brand promise

If a retailer has managed to get the user into store, are they delivering on the experience? The in-store experience for most national brands is the same no matter where you are. Local factors and different needs will have rarely been taken into consideration.

The products, the prices, and the store layout will all be comfortably familiar – yet the customer service is often substandard. Brands need to ask themselves:

  • Why should our customers want to visit our stores?
  • What are they getting from the in-store experience?
  • Are customers getting a great personal experience overall?

In most cases the answer is no.

This inconsistency has evolved from internal teams working in silos, not communicating and not working together. It is imperative the brand and retail team work closely to ensure consistency in brand delivery.

Collaboration is also vital between the CRM team and the media team to craft effective local messaging for specific locations.

Rediscover the lost art of customer service

Brands that sell white goods, TVs, and laptops tend to excel with their customer service. The staff are knowledgeable and provide advice on which product is right for each customer’s needs.

However, in other areas – notably fashion retail, footwear, and mobile phone shops – the service is often poor. There are even instances where the service can cause customers to leave negative online reviews that can hurt the chances of attracting new customers into the store.

Imagine a world where these brands instead offer a personalised, tailored experience for customers based on an understanding of the local trends and interests. In many ways, it is a return to the values that retailers had in previous decades.

This was before big department stores disrupted this way of working, which in turn was disrupted by internet retailing. By going back to the future, retailers can start to fight back and provide a reason to return to the physical store.

At the heart of all of this is remembering to listen to customers. The digital local-first world has given us all the tools to fight back.

Let’s use them.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 21, 2020
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5min1160
Customer Experience in the heart of Europe is advancing in leaps and bounds thanks to the passion of a growing network based in Belgium.
CX Brussels was founded by Jonathan Daniels and Hannah Centeno, with the ambition of building a strong CX professional community based in the Belgian capital that can offer support, information, and the promotion of customer-centric culture.
Initially sprouting from regular Meetup events, the network enjoyed its official inaugural gathering in September 2019, and has since hosted a successful webinar and a summit held at the HQ of Oracle CX Solutions in January.
Learning and sharing: Delegates listen intently during talks at the CX Resolutions event
The CX Resolutions event saw guest speaker Naeem Arif, author of Customer First and founder of NA Consulting, join fellow CX experts Sue Nabeth Moore (founder of consultancy Success Track Enterprise) and Ana Luisa Romero (Customer Experience Specialist at Brussels-based HR specialists SD Worx) to present before an audience featuring delegates from over 20 firms.
Plans are now underway for the next CX Brussels event, the CX Frameworks and Methodologies conference, set to take place in May. The summit aims to bring Customer Experience leaders from across Belgium and neighbouring countries together for a one-day event featuring keynote speeches, workshops, and networking opportunities.
Leading the way: Jonathan Daniels (centre) with CX Resolutions guests Naeem Arif and Ana Luisa Romero
Jonathan Daniels, who runs his own consultancy, CX Centric, and recently contributed to a best-practise book featuring guidance from 22 global CX leaders including Naeem Arif, spoke to CXM about the success of the January summit and the upcoming conference.
“CX Brussels has really kicked 2020 off with a bang, and the CX Resolutions event, which was all about the transformation to a customer-centric mindset, was hugely positive,” Jonathan said.
“Our speakers delivered excellent presentations, with Naeem Arif covering the vital area of trust, while Sue Nabeth Moore outlined and bridged the gap in understanding between “customer success” and Customer Experience.
“Ana Luisa Romero led our workshop on what true truly customer-centric leadership entails, and we have had excellent feedback from our attendees. CX Brussels was founded for people to learn, share and advance in the Customer Experience space, and our next event, CX Frameworks and Methodologies, is shaping up to be an excellent opportunity to drive our goals forward.”
Details on CX Frameworks and Methodologies will be released in the coming weeks on the CX Brussels homepage.

Bhavesh VaghelaBhavesh VaghelaFebruary 20, 2020
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9min1064

If Yoda were to discuss hyper-personalisation in 2020, he might say: “Trust leads to data, data leads to knowledge, knowledge leads to wisdom, wisdom leads to hyper-personalised experiences, hyper-personalised experiences lead to loyalty and finally – loyalty equals survival.”

But while hyper-personalisation has been cited as key to helping many businesses remain competitive, organisations still struggle to balance creepy and convenient without losing the trust of their customers. And while a personalisation mishap might seem inconsequential, it can have a serious impact.

A survey by TrustArc found that even after GDPR, only 36 percent of UK customers have greater trust in companies. Loss of customer trust and relationships can lead to less data collected, resulting in more generic experiences, which ultimately creates a commoditised service, meaning companies must now compete with their counterparts on price. This is the dark side.

But where do digital identity and authentication fit into this puzzle? After all, this is an essential part of delivering a remarkable Customer Experience.

Personalisation isn’t just about being digital, it’s about offering users journeys that suit their unique needs, means and capabilities. And what differentiates the organisations that will succeed from those that fail will be the ability to offer personalised journeys based on transaction type, access, and ability. By dynamically injecting passive and active authentication into the customer journey while allowing for timely feedback loops for learning, organisations can ultimately build trust and loyalty with customers.”

One way where we can observe the role of digital identity and authentication in real time is in the airport, where travellers undergo and strategic mix of both passive and active identity checks. From before they even arrive at the airport (if they check in via their app) to when they depart their gate and board, they are faced with a number of active checkpoints to prove their identity, all the while having their identity passively checked throughout the process.

This is a carefully-built customer journey, since too many active identity checks could frustrate the traveller with the amount of times they must show their ID (friction), but too few active checks on the other hand could lead a traveller to feel that the airport/airline is not following stringent security protocols, and thus the reputation of the organisation suffers.

In 2020, FinTechs and digital-forward banks are succeeding in an ecosystem where changing customer habits mean there is little loyalty to a single provider, and incentive to jump from provider to provider for the best offerings and experience.

But while Banks and FinTechs alike can offer tailored, personalised mobile experiences related to a customer’s spending habits, banks are still mostly unable to offer personalised journeys for those who don’t have the same level of access or ability as the general population.

Jedi tip: Do or do not – there is no try

 

This means that they are still digitally isolating portions of the population who may not have access to the latest smart phone or be able to leverage fingerprint biometrics, for example.

As the larger banks follow nimble FinTech’s lead with the way they represent data in their apps, they will be able to more easily serve all possible populations.

So, how can organisations find the right balance throughout the journey, serve customers in all populations and keep the customer informed? Here are a few tips:

Start small

To avoid the creepiness factor, even when an organisation has the right data to personalise a customer journey, they should approach it with caution.

Perhaps start with diluting the personalisation and corellating with other customers with a similar profile who showed interest. Then organisations should grow with the customer and build preferences over time – becoming wiser.

Present the option

Organisations should also validate assumptions by allowing them to choose whether they receive the personalisation with an option, i.e: “We think you will enjoy this,” letting them validate yes or no.

Design dynamically

When creating a hyper-personalised experience, organisations should remember to consider identity and authentication as a key component. For example, a frictionless experience with minimal authentication can be problematic since the customer’s perception of security contributes to the overall experience.

Similar to how in Star Wars the balance of the force changes over time, so do security needs, so it’s important to blend passive and active identity and authentication to ensure it can dynamically change over time.

Follow best practices

Organisations should also be transparent about what they intend to do with the data they are collecting, and clearly outline the benefit to the customer.

When it comes to personalisation, digital identity and authentication can truly make or break the customer experience. Overall, organisations must be able to offer personalised journeys based on transaction type, access and ability. A user looking to check their account balance at the same time and a place each week doesn’t want to jump through hoops, and extra friction during these regular transactions could lead to huge dissatisfaction.

On the other hand, if a customer is transferring money while riding a train through the countryside, authentication may need to go beyond simple SMS verification. Getting user journeys right based on transaction, location, device and passive behaviour will be key to delivering personalised experiences while maintaining security.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 19, 2020
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4min1064

Global CX and market research solutions provider Confirmit is set to merge with data visualisation reporting firm Dapresy following Confirmit’s acquisition by North European specialist growth equity investor Verdane.

The major investor in Dapresy, Verdane will merge the two companies to create a combination of solutions that “will be unmatched in the market research and Customer Experience arena,” according to Verdane partner Pål Malmros.

As news of the merger broke, Tobi Andersson, CEO of Dapresy, said: “Dapresy has comprehensive CX and market research reporting software, and Confirmit provides the technology that underpins some of the world’s most sophisticated insights programmes. Together, we will provide customers with state-of-the-art collection and reporting for marketing research and customer experience management.”

Ken Østreng, CEO at Confirmit, explained: “This is a hugely exciting move not only for both businesses and their customers, but also for the wider market. As companies who share our goals and values, we’re delighted to be working with both Verdane and Dapresy as we enter this new chapter.”

Confirmit and Dapresy already share many clients. All customers of both companies will enjoy the benefits of further investments in existing products, and “a seamless integration between Confirmit’s solutions and Dapresy’s reporting, which will provide a highly efficient, end-to-end solution that delivers accelerated customer value”.

Employees of both companies will benefit from working with a larger team with exceptional expertise, which will continue to deliver client value through market-leading technology solutions.

Commenting on the news, Faith Adams, Senior Analyst at Forrester, said: “CX is finally getting its due – truly becoming a critical priority for many companies. And because of this, the vendor space to support it, both technology and services, continues to rapidly evolve.

“With this, there continues to be convergence – often happening by way of acquisition. This convergence is not just about specific features and functionality of CX tools, it is about the convergence across the business – employee experience, customer insights, market research, data and analytics, and more.”

Confirmit has a history of highly successful mergers and acquisitions that have strengthened the business and delivered significant value to customers. Previous mergers include: Pulse Train, CustomerSat, Techneos, Integrasco, and IRM.

Verdane is joined by Zobito, the equity growth investor, as co-investor. The Zobito team will bring its “go-to-market expertise and experience” from working with companies such as QlikView to the journey.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 17, 2020
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3min1017

The upcoming Unlock Your #CX Potential conference is set to bring global Customer Experience leaders including Christopher Brooks and Clare Muscutt to Birmingham for the unique one-day event.

Taking place on March 25, the conference is hosted by the the Midlands Retail Forum, under the guidance of CX consultant and author of Customer First, Naeem Arif, and will see delegates gather at the Jaguar Experience Conference Centre for a day of workshops, keynote speeches, and networking.

The event, sponsored by customer service review app Raggit, and hosted with the backing of Birmingham City University, will see award-winning Customer Experience case studies presented throughout the day, while each attendee will leave with a goody bag including essential CX books.

Among the speakers on the day are Christopher Brooks (pictured left), global consultant and Managing Director of customer strategy experts Clientship.

Christopher will be joined by Clare Muscutt of consultancy CMXperience, and Chloe Woolger, CX Commercial Director of global research and in sight leader Kantar.

Also confirmed as speakers are Caroline Cooper, founder of consultancy Naturally Loyal, and Kate Birtles, Director of Customer Service at BMI Group.

Case studies presented on the day will include Jaguar Landrover and United Carpets, with their successful CX strategies aiming to inspire delegates as they embark on their own journey to improve Customer Experience.

Speaking to CXM, conference organiser Naeem Arif (left) said he is very excited to establish Unlock Your #CX Potential in Birmingham, offering a new event for Midlands-based entrepreneurs and established firms to reshape their relationships with customers.

“We have been inundated with speakers who wanted to share their experience, so we have been able to put together a schedule that will amaze our delegates. Our last few speakers and sponsors are being confirmed this week,” Naeem said.

Customer Experience Magazine is a proud media partner of Unlock Your #CX Potential, and a special discount on the ticket price is available by using promo code ‘CXM’ at the following link:

CXM is a proud media partner for this event and delegates can get a CXM specific discount by using Promo Code “CXM’ at this link.

 

 

 

 




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