Nicola CollisterNicola CollisterSeptember 25, 2019
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10min870

It’s time to rethink connected services and the way we interact with our customers.

A lot has changed during the last 20 years in the customer service sphere, and it’s vital that companies engaging in it change too – and challenge themselves to be better. That change is not about to decelerate, and Gartner predicts that by next year, a poor Customer Experience will destroy 30 percent of digital business projects.

Cost is killing innovation and that problem must be solved.

Tackling the swipe right mentality

First, let’s set the scene.

Twenty-seven percent of the world’s adult population was born between 1995 and 2010, and they have never known a world before the dot.com era.

1995 saw the launch of Amazon, eBay, Hotmail, VoIP, PHP, SSL, Javascript, and HTML 2.0, and even those technologies, though still hugely important today, will feel antiquated to the 65 percent of those currently at school today who will be doing jobs that don’t exist yet. And a similar number, we’ve discovered, would sooner stick their head down a toilet than get in touch with a contact centre.

Some reputation, eh?

But it’s symptomatic of the world we live in today, where a ‘swipe right’ mentality trumps persevering with something that isn’t immediately easy to engage with. Of course, we must seek to equip our customers with the tools to help themselves, but that isn’t enough.

Customer engagement opportunities should be cause for celebration and an opportunity to reaffirm a brand’s worth.

Large and small players

The latest figures tell us that 20 percent of customer contact is now outsourced in the UK and there is nothing inherently wrong with this approach. It provides brands with an opportunity to deliver service through specialists, where scale and diversity can help smooth out some of overhead challenges, like needing to house people in buildings and equipping them with the right technology.

The problem, however, is the drive for low-cost servicing that often comes with it. Larger players seek to be the lowest bidder, putting technology between people and service to achieve the bottom line.

Smaller players are sometimes able to offer an approach that ‘cares’ more, but too often can’t compete with a technology and innovation offer. Furthermore, the squeeze on margins through the procurement process has jeopardised how people relate to service delivery.

And disparate delivery creates a fragmented approach that makes no sense to the poor individual who decided to make that call – instead of taking the ‘head down loo’ approach!

Innovation killers

Customers have become commodities and service a number on a balance sheet, and this cost game is killing innovation.

Three-in-ten (29 percent) UK customers are prepared to pay more to receive a great customer service, while 36 percent say they’ll stop doing business with a brand due to poor customer service.

And those numbers are growing all the time.

It’s not just about getting it right; getting it ‘extra right’ increases brand favourability. Those customers who had a positive experience that was better than expected were more than twice as likely to increase their brand favourability than those who had a positive experience that was in line with, or worse, than expectations.

These surveys were done a couple of years ago, but I believe expectations will have only increased. This is why getting it ‘extra right’ can increase brand favourability two-fold.

Meeting expectations

The marketplace is also waking up to the realisation that the more competitive and rapidly-changing the sector, the more at risk they are of not meeting expectations. For example, airlines are five times more likely than public services to have customers citing ‘better experiences with competitors’ cited as a reason why a ‘service encounter’ failed to meet their expectations2.

And studies have concluded that consumers’ expectations are influenced by a much wider body of prior experiences than before. They now go beyond directly comparable sectors, and this should mean there is more of a focus on more fluid expectations in the future.

For many, the experience of booking train travel is now comparable to the experience of online shopping; we’re simply doing more stuff online.

Tail wagging the dog

In other words, I believe that the tail is wagging the dog when it comes to service delivery, simply because service is the biggest driver of value.  So, it is all the more baffling that brands continue to force bad business solutions onto customers.

All customers want are simple, responsive services – regardless of who they are chatting to or what they are chatting about, and whether that be through voice or text.

Innovating, not cost-cutting

In a market that is increasingly becoming defined by a ‘lowest-cost’ approach, it’s time to shatter the myth that out-sourcing is simply a cost-cutting exercise. There is growing demand from customers for responsive, connected, and seamlessly delivered services – and out-sourcing is helping to meet those challenges.

But the so-called ‘race to the bottom’ that cost-cutting creates is damaging the market and causing businesses to overlook the true benefits of partnering with a specialist outsourced contact centre provider.

A good Business Process Outsourcer (BPO) provider should work with its clients to understand their reasons for outsourcing their customer contact centre, and incorporate them as fundamental elements of the services we provide.

The provider will work with clients to deliver each of these benefits and build a relationship that is defined by far more than just an advisor hourly rate.

On our own journey as an outsourcing solutions provider, we strive to be open and pragmatic in everything we do and aim to offer something unique and different in the industry, all while shattering myths like this one along the way!


Sion LewisSion LewisJuly 5, 2019
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8min2613

Working in a call centre has been seen as the very epitome of the “McJob” – a low-paid, unrewarding role that’s usually viewed as a stepping stone to more responsible, better-paid and more meaningful employment.

It shouldn’t be this way.

Customer service representatives (CSRs) play perhaps the most important role in any organisation. They are a business’ window on the world; the face of the corporation. Great CSRs are worth their weight in gold- they solve problems, mollify irate customers, and turn anger and frustration into loyalty and respect.

Businesses need to treasure their CSRs and give them the support to solve customer complaints. If businesses are serious about delivering quality customer service, two things need to change. First, there needs to be a revolution in the way that we view contact centre work. Secondly, we need to give these workers the tools they need to conduct efficient conversations and to resolve customer questions quickly.

It’s time to value CSR

Businesses have little hope of delivering first-class customer service if they don’t value their CSRs, and a look at the hospitality industry is instructive here. In the UK, being a waiter is seen as a low-skilled ‘starter’ job.

But across the Channel, the French take waitering incredibly seriously. Waiters and sommeliers are typically highly trained and very knowledgeable about food and wine, and anyone who has eaten at a decent French restaurant will be familiar with the waiting staff’s air of authority and gravitas – all of which adds to the dining experience.

It’s the same for any sort of customer service. You can have the best product in the world, but if you don’t provide a great customer contact experience you will likely lose much of the goodwill that customers feel towards your brand. Unfortunately, many CSRs today lack the tools and the insight they need to provide fantastic Customer Experience.

Change is on the horizon

When a call comes in, it’s common for customer service staff to spend a significant amount of time authenticating the customer; once they’ve passed security, the CSR can then find themselves without a full picture of the customer and their history, and often lack the information they need to resolve the complaint quickly and efficiently.

There are signs that this view of customer service is about to change, however. AI-powered chatbots, for example, are increasingly taking responsibility for more routine enquiries, removing much of the drudgery of customer service roles and enabling operatives to focus on higher-value tasks.

But chatbots alone won’t transform the role of the CSR. If we are to change perceptions about customer service and make it a fulfilling line of work, we need to get rid of the irritations and inefficiencies that continue to bedevil the role. For example, CSRs typically spend only a quarter of their time actually helping customers. And here, AI can again come to the rescue.

The bigger picture: Businesses can now provide every CSR with all the information from an entire customer journey

Equipping CSRs for success

Smart companies that put a premium on customer service are deploying AI-powered contact centre software that enables them to provide a more in-person experience for online customers by anticipating questions and needs based on their history and where they are in the current journey.

Unfortunately, CSRs often do not have access to vital information such as purchase history or previous complaints. As a result, they go into conversations blind and spend significant amounts of time establishing basic facts before they can resolve the customer query.

Anyone who’s spent time on the phone to customer services will be familiar with the frustration of having to explain their situation multiple times to different customer service employees. By harnessing the latest generation of customer contact tools, businesses can provide every CSR with all the information from entire customer journey, from acquisition, through conversion and into post-sale support, providing companies with everything they need to create an exceptional CX.

Artificial intelligence can deliver meaningful and immediate benefits that put CSRs in the driving seat in every conversation. The benefits are legion: AI can filter out routine customer interactions that can be resolved by a chatbot or self-service, enabling agents to focus on more complex or high-value work. It can ensure seamless transition from bot to agent within the same chat window, meaning the customer doesn’t have to repeat themselves.

Meanwhile, the latest generation of contact centre tools consolidate data from every customer interaction and manages data from disparate systems to deliver real-time actionable insights for faster issue resolution – all of which means that customers spend less time explaining and complaining.

Small wonder that Forrester found that businesses with mature deployments of AI-powered contact centre software saw a 63 percent increase in net promoter score (NPS) and reported an average of eight points higher than their lesser mature counterparts. Furthermore, half of these organisations saw an increase in conversation rates, 56 percent reported an increase in revenue, and 40 percent saw an increase in order size. Even agent satisfaction increased under the more mature organisations with nearly 50 percent reporting an increase in overall job happiness.

If businesses are serious about putting the customer first, the place to start is in the contact centre. They must value these problem solvers and provide them with the tools they need to turn angry, frustrated patrons into loyal customers.


Jeremy PayneJeremy PayneApril 29, 2019
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8min1207

Historically, businesses have primarily perceived call recording as a regulatory insurance policy.

The typical process was that calls were recorded, archived, and then accessed whenever a complaint was made. Some organisations still see call recording primarily in this way today.

Other businesses have moved on a step and carried out batch sampling on call records. Often, they might listen in to every 100th phone call for compliance purposes. They might also focus on monitoring new employees to help embed best practice. Alternatively, they might use the batch recordings for training purposes, picking out examples of angry customers, or high-performing agents dealing with customer queries.

Today, thanks to the latest AI and analytics, organisations can do much more with call recordings. With solutions like coacher and helper bots emerging, together with technologies like real time speech analytics (RTSA), we are seeing the advent of a new world of call recording.

Instead of simply being used reactively for compliance or training, the potential for organisations to use technology working in real-time in conjunction with the customer service representative has raised the bar, making it possible to use these kinds of solutions to drive up customer satisfaction and increase sales.

In particular, this is giving businesses greater insight into their contact centre and customer service operations. They can now listen in to every phone call. They can measure the sentiment of a customer interaction more precisely in real-time. Is the customer getting stressed? Is the agent becoming aggressive? Has the agent failed to make proactive use of the available helper bot to answer the customer’s query?

Answering these questions positively can be key to the success of a business, but it is also important to highlight that call recording today has evolved into much more than just recording a phone call. When listening to call recordings, business managers today also need to know what the agent was looking at on the screen at the time they provided information to the customer for example. Incorrect data on the company’s website could help to exonerate an agent who has made a mistake, and pinpoint a problem that needs to be addressed.

That’s why the ability to capture screen information, helping to put the call in context starts to give supervisors a clearer picture of what is happening within their customer service operation – and that drives better customer satisfaction, and improves the level of first interaction resolution. All this contextual information can then feed into a continuous improvement loop. Where one interaction is resolved successfully that can then feed the knowledge management and information systems making the whole process more accurate.

Barriers to roll-out

If you consider what is possible now and the way many organisations are starting to embrace and use these types of technologies, hand-in-hand with a human agent, the potential to also improve customer service and drive up sales has also increased enormously.

So, given all the benefits that they could achieve from this new approach, why isn’t every business moving over to it? One of the main barriers we are seeing today is cultural. Many organisations follow the ‘if it ain’t broke, why fix it?’ philosophy. This conservative culture is often reinforced by agents who are uncomfortable with more technology listening in to everything they do; monitoring every action they take, and flagging it up to their managers if they are ‘out of line’.

Unfortunately, whenever new technology is introduced into an organisation, it comes with an associated fear factor. Agents are understandably concerned about what the change might mean to them.

Businesses need to do more to listen to these concerns but also educate agents about the potential benefits of the new technology in helping them perform their role. Indeed, smart organisations will work transparently and openly with agents to look at how the technology can be used to make their job better.

Humans can, for example, be especially good at empathy and working with customers who might be in a moment of crisis or an emotionally charged situation. So it makes sense for businesses to free up agents to engage with customers in this way, while deploying bot technology in the background to give them the practical information they need to answer the customer queries and follow the best available next step.

Ultimately, it has to be about empowering the agent, rather than focusing on the mechanics of finding the information the customer is looking for. With the latest call recording technology, the agent can concentrate on the interaction itself, safe in the knowledge that bots are working in the background to provide the information they need to resolve each individual query.

Agents can also can gain from the enhanced training capability on offer. Businesses can use the approach to capture the kinds of phrases or behaviours used by best performing agents or sales staff and build that into the coaching and helping engines to benefit contact centre and customer service staff as a whole.

This kind of ‘hand-in-glove’ harmony between man and machine is critical in this context. When businesses get it right, it can enhance the agent’s life enormously as well as benefitting the business and the end customer. In summary, the latest call recording technology can bring significant benefits to organisations but it needs to be introduced in a way that overcomes the cultural fear that some organisations and their staff have about bringing in the latest advanced technologies. Get all that right and businesses stand to improve their compliance position, enhance employee engagement – and drive up customer satisfaction into the bargain.


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamApril 18, 2019
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5min1198

Customer service has always been a critical tenet of any business model, and the internet is beginning to take centre stage in terms of exposure alongside revenue generation.

However, the entire concept of client relations is changing at what can only be called a breakneck pace. This is partially due to the increased level of online competition. Visitors who feel that their needs are not being catered to will simply look elsewhere in order to procure quality products or services.

This is why the concept of engagement needs to be taken very seriously. What changes are taking place and why is it critical to choose the best ecommerce platform for your organisation?

The demanding nature of the Millennial generation

Millennials now represent a significant demographic, and their numbers continue to grow. Coincidentally, this population segment also tends to be the most fickle and challenging in terms of securing a sale (and for good reason). They are well aware of the technology at their disposal. No longer is a visitor willing to wait 20 or 30 seconds for a page to load. In the event of a question or problem, they expect relevant and helpful answers. So, there is little room for error.

In the past, the majority of customer service solutions involved nothing more than a generic page addressing the most frequently asked questions. This is no longer sufficient due to the ‘organic’ nature of the buyer-seller relationship. The needs of the individual should be addressed as opposed to presenting blanket support in the hopes that it will remain sufficient. There are several ways in which this can be accomplished:

 

  • Real-time chat windows with a live representative
  • Dedicated email addresses for different topics (such as sales issues or technical faults)
  • Social media profiles to enhance real-time interactions


The main issue is that these solutions can be difficult to implement for those who lack the time or the financial flexibility. This is why adopting robust e-commerce solutions is essential.

Targeted and agile e-commerce solutions

E-commerce software was previously defined as architecture meant to expedite the sales process. While this is still relevant, many flexible solutions such as those engineered by Shopify have taken a broader approach to the entire concept.

No longer are these applications limited to online transactions alone. They now provide an all-around means to interact with customers and to present products in an eye-catching manner. In other words, they are intended to streamline the entire notion of client engagement. This is also why e-commerce bundles are absolutely essential in this day and age.

The truth of the matter is that nothing can replace a quality product or service. Still, what takes place ‘behind the scenes’ in regards to customer engagement is now extremely important. Businesses which are able to embrace this decidedly human touch are bound to enjoy sustainable success in the future. There is no better time than the present to implement these techniques in order to meet and exceed the expectations of an online audience.


Daniel OrdDaniel OrdMarch 22, 2019
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9min926

Daniel Ord is the Founder of OmniTouch International, and one of the global Contact Centre industry’s most influential figures. 

With over 30 years of experience under his belt, Daniel is bringing his expertise to a wider audience with a new Masterclass on High Performance Management for Inbound Contact Centres. The two-day Masterclass will take place in Manchester in July, and in London in October. 

 

Have you attended any conferences lately?

After the speeches are done and the workshops concluded, you have the chance to cluster around a table in a coffeeshop or bar and get to know other people who attended the event.

This is when one of my favourite questions comes up: “So how did you get into the Contact Centre industry?”

If you’re an introvert and get goosebumps around networking, then I guarantee you that this question works as a great ice-breaker. 

A happy accident?

Whether it’s Customer Service, Customer Experience, or the Contact Centre, I’ve rarely met anyone who doesn’t have an interesting story about how they accidentally ‘fell’ into the industry.

Some folks come up from being an Agent. That’s cool, because we all know you’ll never forget what it was like to talk to customers. Learning how to persuade, calm, and influence is one of the biggest gifts you get from doing this work.

Others – like myself – fell into the job through management level transfer or acquisition. 

I’m lucky enough to have transferred over from Finance to Operations, and I’ve always been grateful to have that background in numbers of logic to call on when running large centres.

The higher up the management ladder you go, the more you need to work ‘up and out’ in your organisation

When I first got into the industry, I faced the common challenge I think many of you have – most of my seniors thought my job was easy. I mean after all, on paper you just put a bunch of ‘operators’ in place and answer calls or emails or chats… where’s the complexity there?

As time and market forces increasingly put the customer in the centre of the organisational universe, things got a little better. However, I found that at least half my time as a VP Operations was spent talking to senior folks across the organisation – time well spent.

Teaching them about the industry, about customers and about our value proposition. Helping them ‘get it’.

Today, in all my management level Contact Centre courses, I advise folks to make a real organisational impact by getting up and away from your desk and office….and not just walking around your centre, though of course that has value!

I’m talking about booking time with the heads of other functions and getting yourself invited to senior level meetings. You’ve got to make yourself visible and talked about. You’ve got to help people in other job roles solve problems or create opportunities, because if you don’t, your centre – and everyone who works there – will suffer benign neglect.

It’s not an easy industry

I always say that in the Contact Centre industry we have to be masters of many domains. That includes:

  • Operations – after all everything starts here
  • People management & organisational design
  • Leadership & financial management
  • Customer Service & Experience
  • The role of technology in the lives of our customers & people

I can’t think of another industry that places this many demands on its leadership.

And a word of caution…

If you’ve worked a long time for one or two centres, you begin to think that the way ‘you’ work here is the way the ‘industry’ works. Nobel-Winner Daniel Kahneman talks about the danger of ‘WYSIATI’: What you see is all there is.

He teaches that we humans tend to make decisions on incomplete information, thinking that what we see or know now is all there is. Do your best to push back against WYSIATI – I think the best Contact Centre leadership does. 

But no matter how you got there…it’s what you do when you’re there

So you’re there. That’s so cool.

You’re the Contact Centre Manager or Director, and they’re counting on you to be efficient and effective.

When asked what I think is the most important thing to learn first about Contact Centres, I always give the same answer:

Operations!

I can hear some people say “no, it must be customers!”,  or “no way, it’s people!”

But Centres are unique and complex ecosystems. You’ll make better decisions about both your people and your Customers when you’ve mastered Operations. 


Laura OlcelliLaura OlcelliFebruary 28, 2019
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10min1275

“Time heals all wounds,” they say… except for consumers. For them, it seems time actually exacerbates all wounds.

We 21st century customers have become used to having virtually all we want – from online shopping to real-time support – in the blink of an eye and the click of a mouse. Waiting (impatiently), on the other hand, causes us all sorts of brand allergies and long-term intolerance.

This might have to do with consumers’ changing perceptions of time when it comes to customer service and Customer Experience.

Time through time

Time is a slippery concept to grasp and define.

Without looking at the multi-dimensional and distorted scientific context of space-time, and leaving aside the concept of time as ‘the suitable moment/season’, I’ll only focus on present time. That’s right: present (or mostly programmed), because past or future time is just a time to remember or imagine.

We often think of time as seconds, minutes, hours, and days, but these are the units of measure of time, and not time itself.

By definition, time is “the indefinite continued progress of existence and events” (OED), or the interval between beginning and end, and vice versa.

In today’s commercial world, time might be best defined as the passing of each instant between when consumers want something and when they’re going to get it. Between wish and relish – or anger and alleviation. And this time seems to be ticking on a clock of its own.

Tech revolution & CX

The technological revolution has certainly contributed to create a widespread sense of urgency, as Dr Anastasia Dedyukhina argues, but what impact did it specifically have on customer expectations?

Recent research from Salesforce shows that, on average, 64 percent of consumers (out of a sample of 6,700 people worldwide) expect immediate replies from the companies they do business with. This percentage rises to 66 percent when it comes to millennial customers. What’s more, as many as 80 percent of customers agree that real-time responses positively influence brand loyalty.

This might explain why live support is no longer just optional, but an essential component of companies’ customer service tools. Because compared to the average response times of emails or social media (12-10 hours), web chat customers can have their questions answered in a matter of minutes.

At the same time, as Dan Gingiss suggests, social media has “changed the game” in customer service, giving customers more control, and forcing companies – now more than ever in the limelight – to pay more attention.

Clearly customers are gaining the upper hand in this digital reality we live in, and with their higher expectations, average response times are shrinking.

Does this mean that quantity (quick reaction) is set to triumph over quality (outstanding customer service)? Or are they both necessary to blow customers away? Of course they are, it’s 2019! So how can businesses reply to customers in a tick and nurture the company–customer relationship in 280 characters, or just a few lines?

The ABC

It’s not surprising that responsiveness is increasingly emerging as the key to excellent customer service. Already, for over two decades, it’s been one of the five dimensions known as SERVQUAL, which customers use to evaluate the quality of the service they receive. The immediacy of a real-time response gives customers the reassurance they’re being listened to. It’s also a promising sign of a speedy resolution.

But along with responsiveness come other priorities, which can be easily remembered as the ABC of digital customer communication.

A – Attitude:

Virtually all companies nowadays want to be caring, empathetic, friendly and the like – or at least this is what most brand guidelines preach. So why shouldn’t customers expect just that?

There’s a plethora of strategies that front-line staff can use to come across as expected: from embracing an emotive language, to preferring warm over cold words, to controlling their tone through active verb voice. Any comeback – even the fastest one – that reveals indifference would only remind customers that their money can be better spent elsewhere.

B – Brand vs platform balance

Social media and web chat communication present a unique challenge: they require fine tuning the brand tone of voice to the platform where it’s being applied. It would be oxymoronic to sound too formal or artificial. Like travelling to Italy and not eating pizza – it’s just wrong!

On the contrary, vibrant yet professional language, a concise style, and a just touch of emojis whenever appropriate are all good rules of thumb.

C – Correct English, grammar & punctuation

It must not be easy for web chat and social media customer service advisors to be constantly fighting against time, or to be feeling the trepidation of being exposed to a global stage. Yet their writing must be 100 percent error free. There are no excuses.

Perhaps my latest web chat experience would have had a happier ending if Gyles Brandreth’s Have you Eaten Grandma? were part of companies’ compulsive readings. ‘Should of’ would have been written correctly, and ‘story’ might not have been confused with ‘storey’. Instead, was the online support faster and easier than speaking over the phone? Yes.

Did it leave a mark? Yes, but for all the wrong reasons.

As a millennial, someone might say I know very well what it means to want it all and want it now. At the same time though, I recognise that ‘fast and furious’ is not always where it’s all at in customer service. Give me a piece of communication that’s so good I wish I had written it – showing you care and using impeccable English – and you’ll make my day. As for you, you’ll make a customer.


Aleksandar IlićAleksandar IlićJune 19, 2018
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6min1529

Giovanni Toschi is the Founder of AI firms Jatana and BotSupply. The Copenhagen-based entrepreneur took time out to talk to CXM about how we are firmly in the middle of the Golden Age of Customer Experience, and where the industry can go from here…

Your role must give you a great perspective on what businesses need and what customers expect from them. How do you see the overall  role of Customer Experience today?

Giovanni Toschi

Customer Experience is probably going through its Golden Age right now. The awareness of businesses all around the world has grown a lot and they really do care about CX and overall customer satisfaction. No business is unique, everyone has competitors; it’s the relationship with your customers that makes the difference between successful companies and the rest of the businesses that fall behind.

What do companies often do wrong when it comes to CX?

There is more than one thing. First of all, many are faking it. They try to seem like they really care for the customer while they actually care for the cash. Yes, everyone is in the business for the money, but that does not mean you should treat your customers as a number or data. They’re not, and they know when you do that.
Second, they do not devote themselves too much. Low effort to satisfy a customer in most cases end up with bad results for the company.

Customer support plays a big role in Customer Experience. How do you see it?

Interaction between the company and the customer is half of it, honestly. The ways you connect with your customers, including providing customer support, is a key differentiator today.

Automation is a hot topic. Do you think it improves the efficiency of a company and Customer Experience in general?

Absolutely yes, if used correctly. Customers today want everything almost instantly. Twenty-four hours to reply is no longer enough – you have to act fast. But they also want you to show effort and focus on them as an individual. That’s where automation kicks in. It provides instant replies to frequently asked questions, and agents can focus on the more complex topics and connect to the customer on a personal level.

When it comes to automation, it is often associated with the fear of AI replacing humans and taking over their jobs. Do you think this is true and how do you see the future with ‘robots’ as our coworkers?

The same fear was present with the industrial revolution, yet we did not lose jobs, we just created new ones. Machines can replace humans in many positions, but that only means new positions will open. Humans will always have their advantages over robots.

What exactly is Jatana?

We are on a mission to bring Artificial Intelligence to customer support teams of any size. Using Jatana, any company can set up AI automation in their contact centre in a matter of hours. Our solution allows support agents to focus on the issues that matter while leaving repetitive tasks to the AI.

What inspired you and your team to create this tool?

Since 2016, at BotSupply, we have been helping companies like Carlsberg and Mercedes leverage conversational AI to provide better Customer Experience. In the process, we kept on getting requests to develop a solution that could do the same for email support. We put together an initial MVP and after closing the first customer we decided to spin-off the product into a stand-alone company and that’s how Jatana was born.

Could you give us an example of a company that successfully included your tool (or any other automated service) into their business?

We have been operational for a few months only but our customer base includes companies from Scandinavia, as well as other parts of Europe and Asia. A good example is Stocard, a fast-growing German company that developed an app to keep all your loyalty cards in one place.

What is your message to the readers of Customer Experience Magazine?

If you’re reading this magazine that already means that you do care about Customer Experience. That’s great – stay on the right track, follow what’s trending, and don’t let competitors leave you behind. Try to be one step ahead, as that’s how you win the race.




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