CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 20, 2019
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10min100

Millennials have been dubbed the most ‘impatient generation’ in the workplace, with over 90 percent wanting ‘rapid career progression’.

Almost 70 percent of employers believe that this level of ambition and desire is the leading cause of conflict between generations – with a third of Generation X (34 percent) and a quarter of Baby Boomers (24 percent) and Millennials (24 percent) agreeing with this.

The findings come from a Robert Walters whitepaper, which surveyed over 2,000 respondents to find out what it takes to retain millennial professionals.

Chirs Hickey, UK CEO at Robert Walters, said: “According to our survey, almost 60 percent of workers have experienced intergenerational conflict in the workplace. As Millennials make up a growing part of the workforce, finding a way for members of different generations to work together effectively is an increasingly high priority.

“Making sure that managers understand what motivates workers from different generations, how they like to communicate, and identifying common sources of conflict is essential to creating a strong team of varied generations and diversity of opinions.”

Sources of inter-generational conflict in the workplace

1.Workplace culture

According to the Robert Walters report, three quarters of professionals (73 percent) have left a job because of poor company culture. Over half of Millennials reported that poor company culture was a source of disappointment in a new job, with 90 percent claiming that they research the culture in advance of taking an opportunity.

Whilst a third of Millennials felt that meeting their colleagues in a social setting was important, this contrasts with just 15 percent of Generation X and less than one percent of Boomers who value social outings with colleagues.

2. Technology

Millennials widely perceive technology to be at the root of workplace conflicts. Thirty-four percent reported that older workers not understanding new technology was the chief cause of these conflicts, followed by younger workers becoming frustrated at using outdated technology (33 percent).

Millennial professionals are also distinct from their older colleagues in their attitudes towards  social media. Almost 40 percent of Millennials felt that employers should actively encourage workers to incorporate social media into their work, compared to less than a quarter (24 percent) of Generation X and just 10 percent of Baby Boomers.

3. Tailored approach

Employers and employees from Generation X and Baby Boomers believe that Millennials are far more pampered than was ever the norm in the workplace – with their demands for time and a tailored approach way out of line with general expectations.

Whilst only 15 percent of employers believe personalised training programs to be necessary, over a third of Millennials rank this as one of the most important factors in retention. In fact, 53 percent of millennials have been disappointed by the lack of a properly implemented personal development plan or training program when starting a new job.

The demand of senior managements time is further exasperated by an overwhelming 91 percent of Millennials who would like to receive formal feedback at least every six months, with 60 percent stating that they would like this as often as every one to three months.

4. Experience

Given that Millennials have the most formal education of any generation in history, being likely to hold at least a bachelors degree already, the chance to earn qualifications on the job is their lowest priority – unlike fellow colleagues from older generations.

When asked what they believed employers value most in potential workers, 59 percent of Millennials gave personality fit with the team or company culture as a top priority. In contrast, 53 percent of employers felt that hard technical skills were highly important in potential employees.

5. International aspirations

Over half (52 percent) of Millennials said that the opportunity to develop their career abroad was important to them, compared to less than a third (31 percent) of Generation X and 15 percent of Boomers.

Chris states: “One of the side effects of growing up in the digital age is that Millennials often see themselves as ‘citizens of the world’, having grown up in an environment where access to the internet means that geographical boundaries are far less important than they had been in the past.

What do Millennials expect from their employer?

1. Salary

A competitive salary was rated important by all generations, but particularly for ambitious Millennials where salary is largely seen as a reflection of their status and success. In fact, 96n percent of Millennials rated a competitive pay and bonus system as important, and 25 percent stated that this would be the number one reason they would change jobs.

Chris said: “It’s important to note that during the downturn, over half (53 percent) of Millennials took a job with a lower salary than expected. As such, employers should be mindful that this may be a contributing factor as to why salary and remuneration are so important to Millennials.

“It also means that as we move out of economic uncertainty they will expect their salaries to catch up to their expectations.”

2. Progression

Millennials want more than just a job – they want a career, with 69 percent citing a clear path for progression in the business as the most important factor in keeping them engaged.

Chris said: “It is perhaps unsurprising that for Millennials at the outset of their careers, a clear path to progression is the most effective motivator. However, this reflects not just the youth but also the ambition of this generation. Millennials have grown up being told they are capable of achieving anything and this confidence means that they crave responsibility early in their careers.”

In fact, 54 percent of Millennials state that having the opportunity to ‘exercise influence’ in the workplace is a key way to keep them engaged and remain with their current employer.

3. Transparency

Millennials do not shy away from responsibility, and they want to know what needs to be done to earn it. Of all generations surveyed, Millennials placed the highest value on transparency over how they could achieve progress in their career.

Seventy-one percent of Millennials strongly agreed that their employer should provide clear guidelines over earning bonuses or promotions. However, 40 percent of employers do not currently do this.

4. Fulfilment

During the recession many Millennials struggled to find jobs that met their expectations. Thirty-one percent reported that they had taken work in a sector that they did not wish to work in. Now, as the economic outlook improves, many are ready to change jobs to find a new role that better suits their ambitions.

Chris advises: “Employers looking to retain Millennial employees should consider giving them the option to move around the business to find a position that better suits their desired career path, particularly given that 70 percent of Millennials consider job rotation within the business one of the most important aspects of their job.”


Josue Villamar CJosue Villamar CFebruary 18, 2019
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5min152

I was recently tasked with considering the possible challenges of creating a large-scale customer service centre.

I looked at how to combat these challenges and ensure a healthy balance between a traditional call centre and a start-up operation.

The ideal workplace

In my experience, having had the opportunity to have worked with both big corporations and start-ups, I would like to mention some of the characteristics that good start-up environments have in common

• Trust-based environment

• Open communication, a culture of collaboration

• Autonomy

• Innovation – promotes creativity

• Contributions have impact

• Meritocracy

• Casual yet energetic atmosphere

• Flexible hours

• Benefits and modern facilities

These points sound great, but this is not just how the environment is at a start-up – this is also the environment people would really like to have at any workplace. Who wouldn’t like to feel that their job has a great impact in the business?

Who doesn’t want the opportunity to learn new things every day, or to have the chance to own the process and be able to modify it as you see fit? Therefore, the challenge is not to maintain a start-up environment; the challenge is to create a work environment where people still want to be part of after a big scale-up.

Scaling is a big challenge that needs structure and organisation. The main challenge is to mitigate risks, and the faster the operations grow, the more challenging the risks will be. When we talk about risk, we refer to the risks of deteriorating the quality of service; the risks of the collapse of the infrastructure; the risk of burning out your team faster.

To mitigate these risks, it is important to create internal scalable strategy. Here are some recommendations:

1. Make sure you have the right tools

Helpdesk systems provide you with ticketing systems, support articles, reports, statistics, and so on. Do thorough research and tailor the helpdesk to your needs, and make sure you test it properly before you agree on a contract.

2. Define your metrics and get to know your customer more

The KPIs will be the navigator through this journey. Make sure you have a mix of KPIs that measure the performance of the group, the quality of the service, and the satisfaction of the customer.

To have the situation visibility that has already been mentioned, you need to have at least one of these three types of KPIs.

3. Make sure you have the right people

Once you have started the path of growth, you need to make sure that every addition to the team it is the right one. This will save the company so much time and money. Partner up with your talent acquisition team and go through the requirements and they will support you as you select the new talent. Make sure this person has the right mind-set, the right attitude, and lives by the same value standards as the company.

4. Documentation and automation

It is very important to have everything documented properly. This will not only work as a knowledge base for the future, but it will help develop so many other processes. The documentation needs to be accessible but should only be managed by a small group of people. It must be simple, precise, and well-structured.

5. The onboarding process must be well structured.

One of the most important processes that must be well thought out and able to be scaled is the onboarding of new talent. By the end of the onboarding, the agent should be ready to be as independent as possible.

A well-thought onboarding plan should include:

a. An extensive review of all the relevant documentation. Training.

b. A shadowing session with 1-2 different people to expose them to different styles.

c. A review of the Quality Program

d. A review of the company culture

e. A practice session

f. A coaching session with the Team Leader

g. A quiz/test to validate the learning.

h. Re-educate if necessary. Follow-coaching session.

 


Paul AddyPaul AddyFebruary 18, 2019
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5min175

We all hear CEOs, MDs, and leaders of companies saying that employees are their greatest asset.

Therefore, it makes sense to commit considerable resources into recruitment, training, and development. So, what exactly is the secret to attracting the right people and holding onto them?

Remuneration is an influencing factor, but people are growing increasingly more concerned about the overall benefits package.

Offering an imaginative benefits package, such as wellbeing programmes, will help improve the attractiveness of your organisation. These could include a gym, cyber cafe, incentive schemes (financial and non-financial), flexible benefit schemes, and flexible working schemes.

Getting these benefits out in the market is really important and using your company website is the best opportunity to do this. Make sure you utilise this external mechanism to sell the benefits of working for your company. Showcase to prospective employees the great culture you have. Consider setting up a careers microsite giving you the opportunity to create more positive content.

If you believe in your organisation and the culture, then use your current team to attract new employees by offering a recommend a friend scheme.

For most roles in an organisation you can look to recruit for attitude over skills. I am a real believer that if your employees have the right attitude then you can develop them to be great in their roles. It’s much easier to train skill rather than will.

What is really important is the period between the role being offered and the candidate starting with your organisation. Create an engagement process that makes the new employee feel special. Communicate with them regularly and reconfirm that the decision you and they have made is the right one.

If you are hiring based on attitude, then the key to the success of the new employee is the induction process. Ensure that it is thorough and provides them with the knowledge and skills they need to be competent in the role they have been recruited for.

Once you have recruited the right people, you’ll want to keep them. If you foster a great team culture and keep employees well-informed, involved, engaged, and recognised, then they will perform better, stay longer, and progress further. Develop initiatives that communicate your culture and how you engage with your team.

Regular reviews of performance is an important aspect of retaining team members. It is a way of ensuring that employees and their line managers meet regularly, that recognition is given, and development is discussed. If it is robust and is consistently applied, then your employees will feel that there is a culture of fairness across the business.

Ongoing development is important to people, particularly those that want to progress in the organisation, so ensure you have process for identifying these people.

Making your business a place where people want to work will attract a better calibre of candidate. Looking after your employees will not only improve retention but will also increase productivity; it’s better for them and better for you. 


Adam MarslandAdam MarslandFebruary 15, 2019
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6min252

Irrespective of the methodology used, examples of project failure are easy to find.

A simple Google search will show that the Sydney Opera House was completed ten years late and a staggering 14 times over-budget. Ok, but that was completed in the 1970s, haven’t things moved on? The Scottish Parliament building should have taken two years and £40 Million to complete; instead it actually took five years and over £400 million to finally open in 2004.

How about a different type of example? The Rio Olympics overran its intended costs by 51 percent. If you think that’s bad, the Winter Olympics in Sochi cost 289 percent of its initial target. These are not isolated high profile incidents – an estimated 71 percent of projects, irrespective of the size, methodology, or intended audience fail to deliver their expected product, on time and in budget.

With Project Management qualifications in higher demand than ever, there seems to be a disconnect between performance delivery and the utilised framework. Put another way, the lineal sequence of events that predict (and produce) an outcome must be questioned, and that is without considering the impact and diligence of the practitioner invoking the change.

Furthermore, an added layer of complexity can diminish project management understanding further due to the atypical manner in which the intrinsic pieces of the lineal sequence interact and overlap, diminishing the very essence of its construction: to implement successful change to an existing iteration in a regulated manner using proven tools and techniques.

If we use this understanding that a project’s objective is the controlled implementation of a change initiative based on the unquestioned framework of ideas, this leads us to an inherent understanding of the metanarrative of change: project management theory only represents a particular and limited image of practice rather than comprising an all-encompassing theory. Using this notion to establish context, this principle can be broken into two sub-areas of concern:

1) Project management techniques embody a particular way of seeing a practice, which is simultaneously a way of not seeing it. Defined and limited by the construct of an existing prism to view a problem, the emphasis revolves around a logical construct of achieving premeditated targets, namely achieving a particular goal.

The sequence of stages leading to this point is solely directed towards this pursuit; this fails to mitigate the complex personal relationships associated with the project journey alongside questioning if the Key Performance Indicators are relevant for a successful implementation.

2) Traditional project management is innately systematic in nature (in this case it is defined as detail or process focused). Overreliance on this type of practice is unsuited to a wide array on deployed contexts as it only deals with a fragment of a large and complex activity.

Therefore, irrespective of the type of methodology implied on a solution, it fails to account for the rich discourse of its history, stakeholders ambitions, and propensity to deal with design turns regarding its application. This line of thought fails to address the holistic question: rather than a consideration of Agile or Waterfall techniques (for example), we should instead reflect that a pre-formulated and rigid approach carries significant limitations.

A simplistic application of the Gaia theory, the notion of interconnectedness and dependencies based on a multi-layered appreciation of a wider system, can provide a revised guide of future change management.

When faced with a complex choice our natural intuition is to propose a simple solution, often pertaining to a lineal single point of failure. Our internal schematic framework consults our preconceived beliefs, judgements, and experiences to make a preconditioned view of productive progress.

However, trying to act without a full appreciation of the interlocking layers of complexity will lead to a sub-optimal resolution. Instead, adding leverages of change using a complex understanding of relationships, the appreciation of unintended consequences and feedback loops allows a creative solution that can deal with complex issues.

Utilising complexity and curiosity as a vehicle to embrace the unknown permits a deeper analysis of transformation. Ultimately the practitioner can select their implied methodology, such as established project management techniques, once the illustrated canvas has been explored, fully understood, and a future path constructed.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 8, 2019
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2min362

The UK’s employers are failing to earn the trust of staff when it comes to dealing with cyber attacks, new research shows.

The findings from insurance governance experts Mactavish reveals 43 percent of senior executives and managers believe their employers have suffered at least one cyber-attack in the past two years.

However, only 31 percent of those who said this thought it had been dealt with ‘very well’. Just over one-in-five (21 percent) thought they dealt with it ‘poorly’.

The findings also reveal that less than half (48 percent) of senior executives and managers feel their employers are not worried about cyber-attacks, and this helps explain why just 51 percent believe the organisations they work for have good strategies in place for dealing with cyber-attacks. Some 13 percent described their strategies here as ‘poor’,  and 30 percent as ‘average’.

Bruce Hepburn, CEO of Mactavish said: “The chances of suffering from a cyber attack are increasing, but our research suggests many employers are not taking this growing risk seriously enough. Given this, it is fair to assume that many have also not reviewed their insurance policies to make sure they have adequate cover here.”


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 7, 2019
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3min428

Scientists have found that offering employees chocolate could be the key to increased workplace productivity.

Researchers at London Metropolitan University worked with gift firm Bloom & Wild to see if offering staff chocolate and prompting the body to produce the ‘love hormone’ oxytocin played a role in boosting productivity levels.

Oxytocin is produced when people are in happy relationships and is linked to reducing anxiety and stress. A study conducted by the Social Market Foundation proved that employees who were happy reported a 12 percent increase in productivity alone.

The research at London Metropolitan University was conducted to see if receiving gifts can induce higher levels of oxytocin, leading to increased employee efficiency and morale

Dr Una Fairbrother (Head of Biosciences), Dr Sheelaugh Heugh (Head of Student Experience and Academic Outcomes), and PHD Student Elliot Kidd led the experiment and analysed the results.

They split 30 volunteers into three groups to receive a gift of flowers, chocolate, or water. They took saliva samples before the gift arrived, 10 minutes after delivery, and finally 40 minutes after receiving the gift. After the gifting, the saliva samples were tested to detect any changes in hormone levels, including those that are normally associated with love.

Higher levels of oxytocin were detected amongst those receiving chocolates and flowers, while those gifted with water saw the least change.

Dr Fairbrother said: “Participants in the study were selected randomly (only their age, gender, and date of birth was recorded), in order to maintain anonymity in compliance with data protection and the Human Tissue Authority.

“Interestingly, the results show that there was a significant increase in oxytocin after receipt of any gift. Furthermore, within this small group, the effect of the more desirable gifts, such as chocolate and flowers, was more pronounced, with chocolate being marginally on top. This is not surprising since chocolate induces feelings of wellbeing, including an oxytocin response when eaten, thus anticipation is likely to provoke a similar (if smaller) response.”


Valur SvanssonValur SvanssonFebruary 5, 2019
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7min442

Usually referring to romantic relationships or friendships, when one partner starts to ignore the other without any explanation, the practice of ‘ghosting’ has now hit the workplace.

It refers to situations when employees walk out of their jobs without so much as a goodbye, or when candidates with a job offer simply disappear, never bothering to respond, or – if they do accept – failing to turn up on day one. Some people have even pretended that they’ve died in order to avoid awkward conversations with their would-be employer.

In the US, where unemployment levels are at an all-time low and there are more vacancies than job-seekers, employees seem to feel little remorse about walking away. The term even made it into the US Federal Reserve Bank Beige Book, which reports on changing economic conditions in the US, suggesting that ghosting is a significant trend and not just a flash in the pan.

The trend is catching on in the UK too. According to CV-Library, a somewhat surprising one in ten working professionals in the UK have ghosted their employer, citing reasons such as mistreatment by management, unrealistic workloads, and/or a lack of flexibility in their schedules.

These reasons might be legitimate, but the underlying driver for ghosting is the lack of employee engagement. Staff can easily become frustrated – and have their heads turned by others – when a working culture becomes dysfunctional, when there is a breakdown of communication or when they spend their days on boring and demotivating tasks because they don’t have access to the rights tools and technology

The effect on call centres

This disappearance of employees is a particularly worrying prospect for call centres, where turnover is consistently high due to the challenging nature of the role. Agents are expected to deal with frustrated customers eager for answers they are not always equipped to support, often with clunky software that is years behind the technology they use in their everyday lives.

Working in a contact centre can be hard. If an agent believes they have better career prospects elsewhere, it’s no surprise that they want to leave, and ghosting removes the need to even explain their motivations.

How to tackle ghosting

By focusing on improving employee engagement, contact centre operators can find a solution to this most modern of problems. In essence, this involves providing employees with more reasons to stay than to leave.

Here are just a few ways to keep agents happy:

Audit & upgrade technology: According to Ultimate Software, 92 percent of workers say that having the right technology directly impacts their job satisfaction. Teams may grow frustrated if their call centre tech is lagging behind the apps and gadgets they use outside of work.

Offer well-defined career paths: Agents want to develop their careers. If they feel valued and recognise the benefits in staying in their role with the chance to advance through the ranks, they are less likely to look elsewhere. Technology can help with this career development. Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and smartbots stop agents from having to undertake repetitive tasks, freeing up their time so they can concentrate on complex, more rewarding activities. They could even become robot team leaders, overseeing a team of digital workers; a highly sought-after new skill.

Reward everyday achievements: Recognising and rewarding employees who achieve great results is another simple way for employees to feel appreciated. Gamification by, for example, the visualisation of employee KPIs encourages competition and teamwork. A simple wallboard can do this to great effect.

Offer competitive wages: Of course, pay is a highly motivating factor. If people are offered a competitive salary, they are going to see the value in staying put.

The cumulative benefits of improving employee engagement

Boosting employee engagement has many other advantages too.

The loss of talented agents is never a good thing, especially when it affects overall contact centre performance. If agents are motivated, they are more likely to provide exceptional customer service. More often than not, happy staff also means happy customers. What’s more, lowering staff turnover rates also helps reduce costs associated with recruiting, on-boarding, training and IT provisioning.

Employee engagement programmes also help with the retention of the very best talent. The brightest agents tend to be the most alert to better job offers. It is vital to keep the highest achieving – and usually most profitable and valuable – agents focused on, and motivated by, their current roles.

Ghosting is inconvenient and impolite, but it’s not only the wayward employee who is at fault. It’s a warning sign that staff feel demotivated, unhappy, frustrated and under-valued; and the business must take some share of the blame.

To fix this, contact centres should focus on incorporating labour-saving technology that frees up agent time so they can focus on more inspiring tasks. By creating a more positive employee experience, companies will soon find that there are fewer reasons for staff to pull a disappearing act.


Adam PowersAdam PowersJanuary 30, 2019
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7min510

Richard Branson is famously quoted as saying: “I have always believed that the way you treat your employees is the way they will treat your customers, and that people flourish when they are praised.”

Although Mr Branson’s well-used pearls of wisdom might not have the caché that they once did, I would suggest that this view is as valid now as it ever was. A more on-trend leadership guru also agrees with this perspective, Simon Sinek says: “Customers will never love a company until the employees love it first.”

Customer Experience has increasingly been touted as the battleground for modern business success. In a world where great product or lowest price are simply not enough for sustainable growth, it’s the CX of a brand or business, at every touchpoint, that is shaping success.

While we’ve been focussed on an outward looking perspective, there are far fewer businesses that have taken all this strategic thinking, creative passion and financial investment through 180 degrees, directing it within their own organisations.

Whatever the North Star ambitions for the Customer Experience, it’s the workforce, the colleagues, and the employees that will either deliver it or derail it. A modern, connected business is only as good as its weakest touchpoint, meaning greatest success will come from a holistic approach that includes a good deal of effort given to communicating with, enabling and empowering staff.

It is also critically important to recognise that the people who will be delivering the total experience are not some generic horde. It’s essential to understand the different needs and motivations of employees.

When communicating with staff, think about how you can effectively adapt communications in order to engage – that includes both the message and the medium. The all-hands email on a Monday morning really doesn’t cut it. It’s also important to consider and develop tools and technologies that recognise context of use and are genuinely empowering.

So many systems and solutions in businesses today are there because of decisions made a very long way away from the people required to use them.

Don’t underestimate what a sense of purpose can do for employee morale. Again, a well-used tale that talks about the power of having a sense of purpose in an organisation. When US president John F. Kennedy visited the NASA space centre during the height of the space race, he saw a janitor working a broom and walked over and asked him what he was doing.

The janitor responded: “Mr. President, I’m helping put a man on the moon.” When optimising the Employee Experience look for tools that connect staff, make them really feel part of something bigger and enable the business to leverage their collective power. This might well be through technology, but could equally be driven by a radical change in the format of business meetings. Additionally, consider how all that data you’re gathering (You got the memo about Data, right?) can translate into actionable, valuable insights which will empower the whole workforce to understand what they are a part of and how they can better connect with customers.

“Do not be afraid to empower your employees. Empowerment results in happy employees and happy customers,” says John Cashion, Corporate Director of Culture Transformation at the Ritz-Carlton.

They take employee empowerment to the next level by enabling every employee, irrespective of their level, to spend $2000 on meeting a guest’s unmet needs. This doesn’t require the approval of a senior member of staff, it is absolutely at the discretion of each employee.

Cashion goes on to say that, although that is a lot of money, it’s actually the symbolism of the act that’s really huge. Don’t be distracted by the amount, what’s really important is the trust that this shows. The trust in them to resolve a guest issue brilliantly, and to think of creative and memorable ways to elevate the experience.

This activity ladders back up to the top, to the leadership of a business and how it talks and behaves. Getting Employee Experience right is not a project or a one-off event. It is dependent upon persistent and consistent behaviours. It is also heavily dependent upon the accessibility and visibility of leadership. Just as your employees need tools to help them, look for organisational enablers that support leadership in sustaining a highly engaged and high performing workforce delivering a successful total experience.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthJanuary 30, 2019
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5min313

Research by the British Safety Council has identified significant levels of uncertainty in the UK about wellbeing at work.

Its new report Not just free fruit: wellbeing at work, found that employee wellbeing is often ignored or misunderstood, with employers unsure how to define it or improve it, what priority to give it, and how to measure the effectiveness of wellbeing interventions and programmes.

Now, Professor Dame Carol Black, an expert Government advisor on health and work and a campaigner for better mental health and wellbeing, not only explains how it can be done simply but also the reasons why it should be done: improved welling in the workplace can improve productivity by up to 25 percent.

At a time of high job insecurity and the uncertainties of Brexit, she said: “There is no better time than now to say that we must support the staff we’ve got because we don’t know how many of them we are going to have in the future.”

Her views and advice were recorded by the British Safety Council in a series of filmed interviews about the nature of workplace wellbeing:

Professor Carol Black defines wellbeing as: “A sense of contentment which is made up of mental health, physical health and a feeling that where you are at any time is a good place to be. That good place can and should be the workplace.”

Speaking of the role of line managers in promoting wellbeing: “You have to help them understand that supporting their staff is going to give them a more engaged and productive workforce. You must enable them to do this. It’s not just about putting managers on training courses, but also ensuring that they can maintain these skills and are supported by the top of the house.

“You could incentivise them through their appraisal, which in many companies is linked to promotion and remuneration. Some organisations’ appraisals expect managers to meet certain requirements relating to the health and wellbeing of their staff. You can also incentivise managers financially.”

On measuring wellbeing, she continued: “You can measure wellbeing through sickness absence levels. You can also do this by reviewing staff turnover figures, because if staff are not content with a workplace, they leave. Additionally, you can measure engagement scores. You can also measure productivity loss, by adding presenteeism and absence levels.”

On SMEs’ requirements in relation to wellbeing, she added: “Many SMEs are very small and have limited resources, no occupational health and no HR function. Anything you’re going to offer them with regard to wellbeing has to be easily and quickly accessible. You can’t give them a large, however impressive, toolkit and expect them to read it. It has to be available online.”

Matthew Holder, Head of Campaigns at the British Safety Council, said: “We are delighted that Professor Carol Black has agreed to share her expertise with us. She is an authoritative voice on workplace wellbeing, which, although high on the corporate agenda, it is still perceived as ‘fluffy’ and difficult to measure.

“Her suggestions are accessible, practical and instantly actionable. We hope that together with the intelligence gathered in our wellbeing at work report, Professor Black’s videos will become a first point-of-call reference source for companies wishing to develop a culture of wellbeing.”

 


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamJanuary 28, 2019
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3min411

Mark Seemann is a UK tech pioneer and telecommunications trailblazer who is now CEO of StaffCircle, a firm providing a work platform that improves internal communication and feedback for employees.

StaffCircle digitises sentiment, awards, communication, training, ideas, tasks, holidays, and directory and delivers it to staff via the smartphone in their pocket. This reduces staff attrition and creates greater employee engagement, empowerment, and productivity.

In an interview with CXM, Mark discusses the future of employee engagement, and why that future is the here and now…

Tell us about StaffCircle and what the company does

StaffCircle is an Internal Communications and Performance Management Platform. It is designed for organisations needing to have two-way communications and feedback with their office-based employees and also their non-desk-based digitally disconnected workforce.

As the relevance of the Customer Experience concept rises, how important is Employee Experience in this new era?

It’s crucial! Engaged employees deliver a better service and ultimately, happier customers. Employee Experience spans a number of areas, and one of them is Digital Experience which is why we created StaffCircle – to help companies open up the feedback loop between business leaders and the entire workforce.

What are some common failings of firms when it comes to employee engagement?

Most non-desk employees aren’t digitally connected to their companies. One-way communication prevails usually through email or paper.

Companies lack the systems and capability to deliver a consistent Employee Experience across both desk and non-desk-based employees because current systems are not designed for the modern smartphone-centric workforce. This disconnect can cause disengaged employees and information silos.

What are some simple steps organisations can take towards improving employee engagement?

Listen to your employees using surveys or internal workshops. Companies need to create faster feedback loops, opening up a digital information flow with their employees at scale. Take a look at the new technology now available, such as StaffCircle, to see how companies can engage digitally with employees with a Company Information Feed, One2Ones, Learning, Appraisals, and Polls.

What is the future of the relationship between firms and employees as technology and other factors continue to make an impact on that relationship?

Organisations need to engage in structured two-way communications rather than one-way unstructured comms (eg: email or paper).

Organisations need to listen to their employees using digital tools enabling faster feedback and greater information flow. Millennials use advanced digital technology (smartphone apps) at home and on the go; it’s time organisations mobilised their technology stack and opened it up to all of their employees.

 




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Tel: 0207 1932 428

For Masterclass enquiries:
antonija@cxm.co.uk
Tel: 0207 1937 483

Customer Experience Magazine Limited
Acacia Farm, Lower Road,
Royston, Herts, SG8 0EE
Company number: 7511106


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