Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMay 28, 2019
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2min267

The UK’s most desirable SME to work for in 2019 is international technical recruitment specialists VHR.

The global firm, with a base in London, recently secured one of the most significant titles at the 2019 UK Employee Experience Awards, Best Company to Work For – SME, following a presentation before a judging panel comprising some of the UK’s most influential Employee Experience experts.

Following the win, a company spokesperson said: “We were delighted to secure this victory and be named best SME to work for. What a fantastic result a recognition of the efforts and improvements we’ve made in Employee Experience throughout the year.

“On the morning of the awards, we impressed the judges with our presentation, condensing a complex range of working practices into a concise, engaging 15-minute pitch in front of a panel.

“Once the presentation finished, we had the chance to network with a diverse range of business leaders from all sectors. With awards going to organisations ranging from care homes to government agencies, it truly was a chance to attain meaningful new EX perspectives from other professionals.

“Then, of course, the day was topped off by our win. What a day, and we enjoyed celebrating our victory with the rest of our team that week in our monthly company-wide social event.”

VHR


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMay 28, 2019
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4min304

The transformation into a truly employee-centric organisation has earned Shepherds Friendly Society two gongs at the 2019 UK Employee Experience Awards.

Based in Cheadle and with a history dating back to 1826, the mutual society secured the wins at the awards final which was recently held at London’s Park Plaza Riverbank and hosted by Awards International. A delegation presented before a panel of expert judges in the hopes of securing victory in two categories, and their efforts won Gold for Employee-Centric Company, and Bronze for the highly coveted Team of the Year.

Nasrin Hossain, Chief Culture Officer of Shepherds Friendly, spoke to CXM following the event, and described the day’s success.

“This was a much-deserved reward for the Shepherds Friendly Society team and a recognition of the efforts and improvements we’ve made in Employee Experience throughout the year,” Nasrin said.

“More than 300 finalists gathered at the Park Plaza Riverbank in London to compete for a series of coveted prizes and share best practice ideas with one another. Everyone in attendance gained a greater appreciation for how organisations can enable their staff to be contented, productive, and able to realise their potential.

“In the morning, we impressed the judges with our presentation, condensing a complex range of working practices into a concise, engaging 15-minute pitch in front of a judging panel.

“Once the presentation finished, we had the chance to network with a diverse range of business leaders from all sectors. With awards going to organisations ranging from care homes to government agencies, it truly was a chance to attain meaningful new EX perspectives from other professionals.”

Speaking of the wins, Nasrin continued: “When the Employee-Centric Company category results came up, hearing our name read out is something we’ll never forget! It was a very special day for us, and we enjoyed celebrating our victory with our team when we returned to our head office in Cheadle.

We are thrilled to have won Gold for Employee-Centric Company and the Bronze award for Team of the Year. Our commitment is to create an environment where our staff feel valued, supported and driven to achieve the best outcome for our members, and we are delighted that our efforts in doing this have been recognised.

“Thank you to Awards International for organising the event, and we look forward to entering next year to defend our crown!”


Oliver GuyOliver GuyMay 24, 2019
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7min313

Imagining a world whereby stock isn’t tracked and managed is barely worth thinking about.

We’d miss out on sales, end up with too much stock to store in a back office – or even worse, suffer from increased costs as a result of missing a shipment or rescheduling one. To avoid stockout and maximise return on investment, retailers rely on a robust inventory management process. However, the problem is that retailers are drowning in a sea of inventory.

The more the sea rises, the harder it is to stay afloat. On the other hand though, should the water levels decrease, the boat encroaches on further danger. It’s important for retailers to find the middle ground – and sail by calmly.

To avoid the stormy seas, retailers need to prepare to face difficult journeys along the supply chain.

Avoiding the stormy seas

The retail supply chain used to be simple. From supplier to distribution centre, distribution centre to the store, and store to the customer – it has barely changed in 150 years. Yet, today retailers face a stormy journey. As consumer expectations continue to change, and rapidly. The need to fulfil these increasing demands across multiple new channels driving up inventory.

In fact, according to Gartner, 54 percent of retailers say that fulfilling online orders from store increases store inventory by 10 percent. Essentially, even the best run retailers could be having issues with increasing inventory as they expand across channels.

However, what’s more, it’s quite likely that the inventory is covering up issues, not just with the production system, but with issues with the overall omni-channel fulfilment system. These issues can include poor sales forecasts, problematic inventory placement decisions, supplier delivery delays, missing process orchestration, data silos and inefficient manual processes.

Finding the middle ground

To avoid these bumps in the supply chain and to improve the process, retailers need to implement the right technology to facilitate necessary data flows. This applies to both inside and outside of the organisation.

The best place to start is in finding out what the source of these issues is. In doing this, the inventory can then be controlled.

When it comes to inventory and visibility, a great starting point is real-time inventory visibility. This offers instant insight into stock. Think about it. It’s 11am and you’re expecting a bulk delivery, but you have no idea where it is. A real-time inventory visibility solution can help every retailer to overcome this with real-time insights that can make it possible to meet the demands of customers and planners through any channel. By understanding real-time inventory status across all your locations, you can determine the most beneficial way to use the inventory at any specific time to maximise sales and profits. This, whilst also ensuring customer satisfaction.

Increased visibility over the supply chain is crucial in maintaining an updated view of inventory, regardless of the number of systems any retailer has.

A calm sail

We live in a more digital world than ever before. This means consumers are far less patient when going into a store when it comes to finding a certain product they are looking for. If a retail assistant were to walk over to a shelf to see if the product is still in stock, the customer might not wait. The ability to check the online systems is therefore key to giving accurate and up to date information to a customer regarding the location of an item – or alternatively, when the next shipment is due.

This doesn’t just apply to retailers. But, to the customer too. Today’s customers are no longer just going to traditional brick-and-mortar stores. They are shopping online via mobile devices, iPads and tablets. This means they expect to be able to check whether or not a certain product is in store – or if in fact, it’s stocked in a store nearby.

Whilst implementing real-time visibility into the inventory process may take time; it’s easy to understand. This is why it is important that retailers take their time to find the best solution for them.  The retail industry is as its most competitive yet. To stand out in an already crowded space, customer experience must be at the centre of everything we do. This means ensuring every customer is satisfied, with the products they want – as available as they can possibly be. Managing stock efficiently and effectively is crucial to facilitating a top-quality Customer Experience – and in ensuring return purchasing.

 


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7min577

Working with people is great, but taking care of a whole team requires much more work than you can imagine.

Thankfully, we live in a time when employers pay a lot of attention to making their employees happy, satisfied, more productive, and motivated. Trends come and go, but there are ones proven to deliver results, no matter the kind of company being discussed.

Check out these five motivation ideas, and help provide your team with the boost they may need to achieve success.

1. Team exercise

Starting the day with exercise is a proven method that boosts creativity and strongly motivates employees. A study researched the so-called Köhler effect, which explains the correlation of increased motivation when exercising in groups. They came up with the most interesting results…

“An inferior team member performs a difficult task better in a team or coaction situation than one would expect from the knowledge of his or her individual performance. Results suggest that working out with virtually present, superior partners can improve persistence motivation.”

This is just one of the reasons why you should implement group workouts with your team. It can be early in the morning, or before or after lunch. Challenges are very efficient for the entire group – the exercise might last only 10 minutes, but will do so much good for overall productivity.

 

2. Gamification

Gamification is one of the latest trends when it comes to motivating employees. Turning work into a game is risky, but it sure does yield results. The only thing you have to be careful about is not to ‘over-gamify’. So start thinking of fun, exciting ways to have the team do the job through a game.

Use it once in a while, and everyone will be more creative, productive, and motivated. Every game should end with a reward for the winner – think of badges for milestones, gifts, and of course, praise!

3. Empower them with better tools

Everyone wants to work at a place equipped with the latest tools. It’s not only tech firms who need gadgets, and you can boost motivation in the workplace by purchasing some new tools that are better and more efficient compared to ones you had before.

The team will be able to get the work done much faster, and they will be stimulated to perform better. It will be an investment that brings results right away. If you are seriously thinking of implementing this tip, you can use some of these discount codes for the best prices available.

4. Attend events as a team

Enjoying social events can help a lot with team bonding and boosting motivation. People love working in companies that also pay attention to this social factor.

Spending eight hours in an office together will not help people get to know their colleagues as much as you might think. Some of the best and simplest ideas are to organise a lunch, breakfast, or dinner once a month, or to schedule a game day, cocktail night, party and more.

“Companies with engaged employees make 2.5 times more than their less-engaged counterparts. Engaged employees are a whopping 87% less likely to leave their companies.”

5. Manage employees as individuals also

Yes, you are working as a team, but every single employee is different and has a different way of communicating. Make sure that you manage them as individuals and not only as a group.

People have diverse characters, so to push them and boost the motivation you have to pay attention to each individual. Take five minutes for a quick meeting with each employee at least once a month. Get to know them well, and it will pay off for the whole team.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMay 17, 2019
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6min458

Wednesday 15th May was the biggest and most successful UK Employee Experience Awards in Awards International history!

More than 300 finalists gathered at the Park Plaza Riverbank in London to compete for a series of coveted prizes and share best practice ideas with one another. Everyone in attendance gained a greater appreciation for how organisations enable their staff to be contented, productive and able to realise their potential.

Business professionals from a wide variety of sectors celebrated the advances made in employee experience in the last year, and the standard of entries was exceptionally high.

 

 

 

Special mention goes to The Holly Private Hospital, who won gold awards in four categories and the Overall Winner prize for best individual entry. Octopus Energy and Brighterkind also performed strongly, winning two golds each.

To see the full list of winners, click here.

 

 

The event itself stressed the importance of employee experience across sectors: awards went to organisations ranging from dating apps to government agencies, and finalists said they attained meaningful perspectives by learning how others approach EX.

 

 

And thanks to the generosity of everyone in attendance, we smashed our EXA charity raffle record by raising £3600 for Barnardo’s.

Hosted by Clare McDonnell, who praised the finalists for increasing employee-centrism in business, the ceremony also featured a keynote speech from Ben Whitter (a.k.a Mr Employee Experience) and surprise musical entertainment from The Three Waiters.

 

The early bird deadline for entering the UK Customer Experience Awards is 31st May – enter today!

 


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8min468

The growth of technology combined with the idea that we need to work harder to achieve more is a popular concept in the modern workplace.

While there’s no denying the benefits and triumphs that come from committed bursts of hard work, unwavering dedication can tip the balance, turning a hard-worker into a workaholic.

As technology makes it increasingly easy to push beyond the nine-to-five, it’s vital for workers to recognise the difference between committed working habits and work addiction.

Last month, a new study by TUC highlighted how UK staff work the longest hours in the EU, with full-time employees working up to an average of 42 hours a week. Research by Harvard Business Review shows the average CEO works 62.5 hours a week – around 21.3 hours above the global baseline of 41.2 hours. In the UK, 54 percent of employees check work emails on holiday and six percent admit to even checking them at a funeral.

With smartphones, computers, and apps at our fingertips, we’re able to maintain a constant connection to our work. In theory, these tools should make our workdays shorter and more efficient, but constant distractions and the inability to disconnect can lead to longer work hours and less to show for it.

According to the Bergen Work Addiction Scale, replying ‘often’ or ‘always’ to at least four of the following seven criteria may indicate a work addiction:

  1. You think of how you can free up more time to work
  2. You spend much more time working than initially intended
  3. You work in order to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, helplessness, and depression
  4. You have been told by others to cut down on work without listening to them
  5. You become stressed if you are prohibited from working
  6. You deprioritise hobbies, leisure activities, and exercise because of your work
  7. You work so much that it has negatively influenced your health

Impact on employees

Studies from CIPD show a sharp rise in ‘presenteeism’ over the last few years, from just 26 percent in 2010 to 86 percent in 2017, while another report shows a cost of £81 billion each year in the UK.

Work-obsessed CEOs run the risk of creating a company culture in which presenteeism reigns. As opposed to being absent from work, presenteeism leads to employees having lower productivity while at work. They’re also likely to feel judged according to how many hours they sit at their desks, rather than the quality of their output. This can lead to burnout, unhappiness, and increased health issues which end up impacting both company and employee negatively in the long-run.

Impact on business growth

CEOs who work too hard may have trouble delegating effectively or even end up micromanaging teams, which can lead to a bottleneck in the company. It also sends the message to employees that they’re not trusted or talented enough to meet expectations, which can cause tension and unhappiness. 

In a Harvard Business Review study of 27 CEOs over three months, time management proved the greatest challenge for most, while email usage was the top interrupter of the day. Leaders in the same study spent 72 percent of their time in work meetings, with the average meeting length being one hour.

One of the biggest time wasters for employees is distraction at work. Around 60 percent of employees say meetings are a big distraction that impact productivity according to Udemy, ultimately leading to longer hours spent working.

Regain the balance

While the dedication to put in extra hours is a valuable trait, it’s important to manage a healthy balance in the long-term. One of the major differences between a hard worker and a workaholic is the problems that are caused as a result. Poor health, guilt when not working, and increased stress levels are often consequences of work addiction. Here are a few ways to combat it: 

Trust your team: For a team to grow successfully, it’s important to attract and retain talented employees, delegate effectively, and trust them to perform tasks without you. This will free up time for you to focus on strategy and growth.

Reduce distraction: Shorten meetings, set dedicated working times where people can focus, and create a culture of face to face interaction rather than using email. Around 40 percent of employees believe work distraction could also be drastically reduced with flexible and remote working options, according to a report by Udemy.

Encourage work-life balance: Instill a 40-hour work week for everyone- CEOs included – with an emphasis on results rather than hours spent at a desk.

Try a digital detox: Limit time spent online by consciously logging off of your work email and putting your phone away during weekends and on holiday. Set the tone in your organisation by normalising the fact that employees don’t have to adopt an always-on attitude. There are several apps that can assist by locking your devices for a period of time. 

Allow mornings to set the precedent for the rest of the day. Whether taking time out to exercise, read, meditate, or plan for the day, prioritise setting the tone for the hours to come every morning. When planning out your day, stick to a realistic to do list of no more than five items at a time.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMay 7, 2019
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2min372

One-in-three workers feel uncomfortable approaching their managers about problems at work, according to new poll conducted by the TUC.

The findings are published in a new report, Improving Line Management, which revealed that 32 percent of respondents have issues bringing matters to their direct superiors. The study also founds that while the majority of UK workers feel supported by their bosses, more than a third (35 percent) do not believe their line manager treats them and their colleagues fairly.

More than two-fifths (45 percent) of workers believe their line manager does not help “morale” at work. Meanwhile, the poll also reveals that many UK workers feel in the dark about their workplace rights, and nearly half of respondents (44 percent) say their line-manager fails to ensure they know their rights at work.

Despite being crucial to workers’ well-being and productivity, less than half of UK managers got any training in the last year, according to most recent government statistics.

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “Having a good manager is crucial to how we get on at work. But businesses are not investing enough in training managers. It’s shocking that so many workers feel afraid to raise issues with their boss and are not being told about their rights at work.

“If we want better and more productive workplaces, we need to step up investment in training – including for managers. Anyone who isn’t getting the support they deserve at work should join a union today.”

 


Alice NewAlice NewMay 2, 2019
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7min733

We all understand the importance of employees having a growth mindset and engaging in lifelong learning.

These are essential habits to foster at a cultural level to maximise Customer Experience. What’s interesting is that attitudes among employees, particularly for voluntary learning and building on soft skills, has changed. Having the chance to develop personally and “put my talents to good use” is one of the top five things that employees of all age groups value most in life and we also know that learning is a key driver of workplace happiness and employee engagement.

This was cited as very important by 80 percent of working adults in our recent study at GoodHabitz. It shows that people want the opportunity to keep on learning and challenging themselves, especially when it means they can learn new skills that benefit them personally and professionally. Lifelong learning has finally become accepted as an integral part of working life and this is true across all educational backgrounds.

Interestingly though, in the same way that appetites for learning are increasing, so too is the expectation that employers also need to allow for time off work to facilitate learning. Eighty-six percent of employees in our study thought they should be given time off during working hours to dedicate to learning and development, with 23 percent expecting this as standard – a 10 percent increase on previous years.

One-in-five employees believed that professional learning should only take place during working hours. That might be acceptable for compliance based training, but for life skills like time management, dealing with stress, influence and negotiation, that’s just not feasible.

For employers to free up time and deliver in line with these high expectations requires a shift away from traditional classroom study to online methods. It’s not economically viable otherwise. More significantly, it requires a change in thinking away from expecting employees to complete online courses in one sitting, to being able to dip in and out of their learning, to suit competing time constraints.

We know from experience that if you ask employees – especially the ones in customer facing roles – what stops them from undertaking voluntary training courses, the vast majority will state “a lack of time”. Even the most engaged learners can only dedicate five or 10 minutes a day at best. We need to be facilitating what Josh Bersin describes as “learning in the flow of work”, in which employees have the chance to learn constantly, when it suits them, taking advantage of odd moments.

They might be on the train, waiting for a conference call to start (or maybe even during the call if it’s a dull one), whilst eating lunch at their desks, or as a podcast when sitting in traffic. Provided the training content has been designed to allow for micro-learning, there is no reason why this isn’t equally or even more effective than completing an entire course in a single setting.

Researchers have shown that when information is delivered in small chunks, it’s much easier to retain and the learning process is much more efficient – almost 20 percent higher. It more closely matches the brain’s ability to process information and recall is much higher. This is because learners can work at their own pace, they are not overwhelmed with information and most importantly, they are in the right ‘zone’ to learn. Typically, micro-learning content addresses only one or two learning objectives, but psychologists have measured that it generates, on average, four to five learned takeaways.

For micro-learning to be really successful, it needs a mindset shift at the organisational level. Ten minutes spent learning about presenting for success for example, is much better than nothing. It might have been just enough to give the person the tips they needed to improve performance. That’s learning in the flow of work.

To embed that into an organisations’ culture, we need to stop ticking boxes or measuring completion rates and instead look at the wider ‘diversity of learning’ that’s happening. The ‘completer finisher’ learning attitude has come about as a result of classroom-based training. A person had to be present to get their certificate of completion and from traditional e-learning that was compliance focused. Personal development is different and much less rigid.

Why not simply facilitate the process and adopt an ‘all learning is better than no learning’ approach instead? Let people take responsibility for their own self development and just provide the resources and encouragement. If employees complete part of a course on a topic, they will have benefitted and got what they needed at that time, plus they know where to go when they want to continue and may well come back to finish it. It’s better to think of online learning as a vast resource of learning material, like a library. Irrespective of whether they receive a certificate or not, they have learned something new that they can apply in their working or professional life.


Jo UpwardJo UpwardApril 29, 2019
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8min615

The Delphi Study of Work 2050 can be seen as a sober read for those of us working in workplace culture.

As well as predicting an unemployment rate of around 24 percent of the world’s population by 2050 due to the convergence of technology, it talks about how we will be both virtual and metaverse-centric or living in a collective virtual world. 

There is no doubt that the impact of the next round of technology advances will be profound.  We are already going from ANI (Artificial Narrow Intelligence), where machines can learn a specific task, to AGI (Artificial General Intelligence), where they mimic humans, to bordering on the ASI (Artificial Super Intelligence), where machines’ abilities and functions become superior to that of humans. 

What this means for the workforce is that the nature of work has changed. Today we are multi-local and mobile. By 2050 we will live and work in a collective virtual world. No longer ‘jobs for life’ – there will be fewer permanent contracts, more patchwork careers, and a need to invest in long-term learning.

By 2030, digital assistants will guide us through our day, connected to our schedules, aware of our preferences, and with the ability and knowledge to book our favourite restaurants, plan routes, and arrange transportation for our travel.  Keyboards will be a thing of the past as interaction with devices will be via speech and gesture, and everything will be connected – by 2030, 20 percent of the world’s electricity is forecast to be used by the billions of connected devices.

We will of course be driven to work by our driverless car, which will be enabled by 5G, that it is predicted will have over two billion connections by 2030. And we will have less days off sick – a combined result of working on freelance contracts with no sick pay and the fact that our health will be monitored through our wearable devices.

So what does this mean for those of us working in workplace design and culture? How do we attract people to a workplace when we know the future is about designing for the tech rather than the talent?

We know that all businesses will need to be digital – to embrace digital transformation within their workforce. We also know that the human aspect is often what puts the heart into our businesses and gives us our point of differentiation from our competitors.  So, how do we design the space that brings digital transformation into our workplace yet is attractive to those who will work within it?

Flexibility in the workplace

Firstly, we need to create flexibility in the work environment to help teams work in a more agile way. Work will more organised around project not function and this can be challenging to accommodate in a fixed space. People need to be able to move from project to project and the technology and space needs to accommodate this seamlessly without causing delay or disturbance to those working agilely.

We all know that real estate is expensive and therefore the tendency is to cram people into the office space and ‘agility’ becomes another word for too many people in too little space. Digital teams, such as developers, also tend to be office-based rather than flexible workers, so the challenge is to create clever collaborative spaces where teams can get together on an hourly, daily, and weekly basis to discuss projects and progress, but also have space for concentrated activity.

The space needs to be attractive

To attract and retain good people you need to create attractive workplaces. We all have seen on YouTube, or at least heard about, Google’s offices complete with slide, putting green, and revolving bookcases, and although most of us don’t stretch to that level of innovation or budget, we do need to make our workforce proud of the space they work in.

The 360 degree work we live and work in means that we share far more of our lives on a day-to-day level. This includes our life in the office. Workspaces need to reflect the brand – so what you are externally saying to customers, internally lines up with your staff. This isn’t just graphics on the wall, but how the brand is lived and demonstrated within the workplace, including what food offerings are available, what rest and relaxation areas there are, how wellbeing is being addressed, and so on.

Ability to engage all

Ensuring that your frontline staff – for example those working in retail or those in the field – are delivering your brand and feel their workplace reflects them too is key. For example, getting feedback from these frontline staff in real-time or even delivering internal and external communication strategies in 3D and on their own mobile devices, can be a way to excite them about product launches, educate them about brand values, and make them feel that they know – and understand – what is going on within the company.

Culture comes from people, not brands, products, or robots. Every workforce needs a culture and therefore needs to place their people at the heart of workspace they are working in, whether this workspace is in the office, in the field, or virtual.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthApril 26, 2019
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4min729

UK Employee Experience Award winner Let’s Get Healthy is behind a new campaign to help the Co-op support customers and colleagues who have suffered a bereavement.

Let’s Get Healthy, which won Gold in the Health & Wellbeing category at the 2018 UK Employee Experience Awards in London, is delivering training to Co-op customer service centre staff that will equip them with techniques to offer support including arranging funerals and other post-bereavement plans.

Co-op – winner of the Best Contact Centre and Product Service Improvement: Transforming Customer Care categories in the 2018 UK Complaint Handling Awards –  is one of many thought leader firms providing training for colleagues to help them be resilient in what can be very stressful times.

Following a successful pilot of the campaign in November 2018, the programme will now be delivered across the customer service centre. The campaign includes a briefing session with senior managers, a one-day face to face course, and a seven-week plan of activity led by team leaders and operations managers to embed the learnings.

The dedicated training is designed to empower more colleagues to be brave-hearted and resilient, supporting adults through the stages of bereavement while being mindful that employees will have lost loved ones too.

Leeds-based Let’s Get Healthy has previously  provided corporate wellbeing services to firms including William Hill, G’s Fresh, Travis Perkins, and Northern.

Claire Carroll, Head of Member and Customer Services at Co-op, said: “We held sessions with our colleagues, and they shared with me their personal experiences of losing a loved one and supporting customers who have experienced a similar loss.

“Let’s Get Healthy designed a programme called Heart that helped my team be brave hearted when dealing with customers who may be broken hearted. The language itself has made it easier for us all to talk about death and how we deal with it. Providing tools and techniques to be resilient is essential in the type of work handled in service centres and this is the third year we have worked with the team at Let’s Get Healthy and we see huge benefits each year.”

Maria Bourke, Managing Director of Let’s Get Healthy, said: “Co-op identified the need to embed health and wellbeing as part of its wider business strategy to invest in its colleagues. This may be a unique topic to cover but bereavement affects every single employee in every single employer across the UK.  It’s always great to support thought leading organisations and I am thrilled that the roll out has started across Co-op.”




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