Craig SummersCraig SummersFebruary 20, 2019
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8min86

Embracing technology is a prerequisite for success in the modern retail environment.

There are many ways in which retailers can deliver a new in-store experience – and while some retailers will undoubtedly look to emulate the human touch free Amazon Go model, for many others human interaction is the primary and fundamental component of a positive bricks and mortar experience. From hiking boots to party shoes, it is still the shared experience of the store associate and customer that will remain an essential component of the in-store engagement for many.

Each retailer will need to understand the optimal model for its customer base, offering the best mix of touch free interaction and empowered store associate. With cloud-based mPOS, there is no technology barrier to delivering a new and positive retail experience – the challenge is to envisage the right customer model. The checkout of the future must be whatever the customer wants it to be, at any time. Released from the shackles of legacy technology, retailers now have enormous opportunities to rethink and reconsider the in-store experience and reimagine the customer journey.

Getting the basics right

The checkout is the point of sale – but it is not a standalone function; it needs to be embedded within the overall service proposition. Customers don’t want to wait in line; nor are they willing to undertake multiple separate transactions to fulfil in-store needs. They want one, simple and frictionless transaction that covers an in-store purchase, a click & collect order, a product return, even ordering another item that is not in store but can be sent from another location either to that store or to the customer’s preferred address.

An effective and efficient checkout process also needs to automatically and effectively handle coupons, apply the correct promotional pricing, capture loyalty information, and so on. But it will also be integrated directly with core operational systems to provide store associates with real-time inventory information and customer history.

The question for retailers is how and where to deliver that point of sale. Should be it the fast, touch-free approach enabled by kiosks or self-service? Or should it be provided by a store associate? And if the latter, how and where within the store should that interaction occur?

Man vs Machine

Clearly for many retailers, an Amazon Go approach appeals. It maximises technology to minimise costly store associates and provides customers with a fast, frictionless experience: the checkout is achieved simply by walking out of the store with automatically scanned items and payment taken from the pre-authorised account.

This is not, of course, a model that has generic appeal – aside from the fact that it is massively unprofitable today and unachievable for the majority of organisations. Forget tagging technology and customer identification solutions, right now many retailers can’t even provide their Store Associates with a single view of available inventory!

But there are undoubtedly aspects of this frictionless experience that should be embedded within every retail model – and a core component of this process will be the checkout. Whether a customer is looking for speed or experience – or both – the checkout is key.

Retailers have spent over a decade optimising the ‘buy button’ online, and the checkout is effectively that ‘buy button’ moment in store. The challenge for retailers is to create a checkout in store that effectively masks the growing complexity of the retail model from both the customer and store associate. Mobile Point of Sale (mPOS) is an obvious solution, providing Store Associates with the ability to close the deal with customers anywhere in store, yet, just 42% of retailers have mPOS in place.

Retail as a service

Retailers have been massively constrained by the incredibly outdated legacy solutions deployed in-store. Hard wired, monolithic systems based on fixed telephone lines for payment, these solutions are both over specified and under delivering. The latest generation of cloud-based technology supports deployments anywhere – in-store, on traditional Windows terminals, or on mobile iOS and Android devices, delivers real-time access to global network availability and ensures that high-speed checkout is available even if the network connection is disrupted.

A store associate armed with a mobile device that provides real time access to inventory across the organisation and ensures the aisle is always endless – and the ability to order those products – can embark upon a meaningful customer dialogue anywhere within the store.

Critically, with a mobile solution that seamlessly supports the checkout process whenever the customer is ready and through whatever payment format the customer prefers, the store ‘buy button’ is optimised. Whether a traditional ‘card present’ payment process or a customer’s own mobile payment app, there should be no break in the engagement to achieve the seamless in-store check-out that consumers crave.

Conclusion

It is only now, thanks to the power of the cloud, of the mobile app, of rich POS solution functionality that is seamlessly integrated with other store and enterprise systems, that retailers have the chance to break away from the constraints of their legacy technology and reconsider the entire store concept.

Does the retailer even need a static desk anymore or can all store associates be mobile? Will the customer base respond well to this model or does the retailer have a core demographic that wants a choice of both traditional and new? With confidence in the technology and an ability to deliver diverse customer services within the store, a retailer can begin to rethink the experience, to experiment with new models for customer engagement and truly offer an efficient and personalised service with a bit of ‘wow’ thrown in.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 20, 2019
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3min79

Telefónica, whose O2 brand has enjoyed success at the UK Customer Experience Awards, has announced a new deal to use crowdsourced data as its global standard for mobile network CX testing and benchmarking.

The firm has signed an agreement with the world’s largest mobile network data company Tutela, which collects over 30 billion crowdsourced network performance measurements from more than 250 million devices around the world every day.

This new agreement will enable Telefónica and its global operating businesses to make use of Tutela’s crowdsourced data and tools in each of its 17 active markets, and will enable the organisation to measure key mobile network performance indicators continuously, including signal strength and quality, download speed patterns, and device performance in order to make ongoing Customer Experience improvements.

Juan Manuel Caro, Global Director of Network and IT operations  at Telefónica, said: “We are continually striving to improve the mobile experience of our customers, and using Tutela’s data and tools as part of our Customer Experience strategy will ensure our customers enjoy the best experience on our networks.

“Tutela’s global crowdsourced dataset will allow us to evaluate our main KPIs related to Customer Satisfaction as a function of different factors like the device, kind of connection, technology or location, in order to continue improving Telefonica Network Customer Satisfaction.”

Tom Luke, Vice President at Tutela added: “We’re thrilled that Telefónica has adopted our crowdsourced data, methodology and tools as its global standard for crowdsourced network performance benchmarking, expanding on the successful projects that we have already had with a number of their operating businesses. We will contribute our data solutions and expertise to assist Telefonica in making network investment and optimisation decisions which will have the biggest impact to their Customer Experience.”

 


Jamie ThorpeJamie ThorpeFebruary 15, 2019
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10min313

There’s no doubt about it – we’re seeing an epidemic of survey fatigue, and consumers and businesses are both suffering.    

A third of people will walk away from a brand they love after one bad experience – and that includes any follow up research.  There’s so much we want to know from our customers, but with requests for feedback constantly increasing, we risk turning off consumers with research that feels onerous and ‘old school’.

Brands need to stay focused. It’s not good enough to simply migrate old questionnaires onto newer platforms like mobile and hope for the best. Instead, brands should be thinking leaner and lighter. Here’s how:

Put yourself in the right shoes

Not yours – your customers’. Surveys shouldn’t overstretch your audience, bore them, or make them wonder what the point was.  A survey is part of their overall Customer Experience. With that in mind, make it feel right for the moment. Don’t ask everything at once – make the questions relevant and sensible. 

Get on with it

Don’t spread yourself too thin. Focus on a single aspect of their experience – one that is still fresh in their minds. By respecting the customer’s time and keeping things short and easy you’ll reduce drop-out rates, meaning you’ve got more insight to work with.

Look for the nuance

Shorter doesn’t mean multiple choice. Think about text analysis, and where written responses (and increasingly, feedback relayed via voice, video, photos, and even emoji) could help you identify key themes, pinch points, or barriers for your customers. If you’re worried about this making your survey more difficult to complete, especially if users are on mobile devices, even asking for descriptive words will help – you’re not looking for chapter and verse. 

Some companies are even moving back to interactive voice response (IVR) technology, because they understand that it’s easier for the customer to talk than to type – and that this often generates a more honest response. 

Technique matters

A series of questions measured against the same scale makes it easy for respondents to lose focus. That’s when they start simply answering ‘agree’ to everything or scoring all questions the same, because it saves thinking effort and gets them to the end of the survey faster. It’s a sure-fire way to get poor quality results. Shake things up to avoid it happening.

Make it personal

If someone’s a regular customer they don’t want to see the same old survey over and over again – survey fatigue is bad enough already. If you can, use transactional information to make your questions relevant to your customers’ experiences: dates, locations, money spent – anything that shows that you know them, and that you want to learn something specific from their feedback. Don’t show you know them too much though. Privacy is important, so don’t go against GDPR and the MRS Code of Conduct.

Give it energy

Ask a dull question and get a dull response. Instead, be creative and challenge consumers to be different. Try asking questions like: “What would you change if you were our CEO for the day?”, “If we were in a customer service competition, what medal would you give us?”, or “Would you employ one of our staff in your business?”.  

Don’t do it for the sake of differentiation or frivolity though – remember your resulting responses still need to be valuable and actionable. 

Stay on brand

Every survey is a golden opportunity to get people to engage with your brand. It’s a chance to strengthen relationships with customers and show you value them. Work closely with your marketing team to make sure that your surveys reflect your brand values and are true to its tone of voice. It might feel like you’re relinquishing control but these experts know what works, and when it comes to Customer Experience no organisation should be operating in silos.

Remember, the last impression you leave is often the most enduring, so the way you deliver your survey is going to be the way people will recall your brand.

Test it till it hurts

Test everything: your ideas, your subject lines, and your questions. Will they give you varied, insightful responses? Make every element of your survey work as hard as possible. Repeat to yourself: there’s huge benefit in marginal gains. 

Appreciate the limitations

There’s no doubt that surveys can deliver value, but they’re not the only way to gather feedback. Even when designed well, you’ll only ever receive responses from a small proportion of the survey field, and those customers who do complete them may naturally share common characteristics and preferences – something frustrated CX teams would be quick to confirm.

Think about what surveys are not giving you – are you trying to validate existing data, or fill in gaps in information? Or are you trying to gauge the opinion of a hard-to-reach group, or tap into unsolicited feedback?

Consider harvesting social data, using text or voice analysis or predictive analytics. Remember: the average NPS score of a company which integrates feedback from four or more different channels is 14 points higher than the baseline. Not convinced?  One airline we worked with saw a one percent increase in NPS translate to more than 100,000 extra bookings a year, so there’s a lot to gain from getting it right. 

And if you’re still thinking “But…!”

Relax. As a first step, concentrate on in-the-moment feedback – there’s never a better moment than now. Capturing live responses means better quality answers, higher response rates, and the chance to fix any immediate problems your customers are flagging. Once you’ve got that down, you can start joining the dots and creating a bigger picture later.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 14, 2019
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3min296

Entries are now open for the 2019 UK Customer Experience Awards, which this year is marking ten years of celebrating the very best CX in Britain.

The gala event will take place on October 10 at London’s Wembley Stadium, where finalists representing some of the best-known brands in the country will gather to make presentations before an expert panel of judges, hoping to secure one of 24 category titles that reflect every aspect of customer centricity.

New categories for 2019 include Employee Experience, Employees at the Heart of Everything, Hospitality & Leisure, Retail, and Professional Services, and the awards will be presented during an evening black tie dinner ceremony.

Applications are now being taken from potential judges to join the line-up, and you can click here to find out more about becoming a UKCXA judge.

The finals, which are chaired once again by international CX consultant and author Ian Golding, is also one of the UK’s best CX networking opportunities, with hundreds gathering at the iconic venue to support colleagues and celebrate what makes the UK a beacon of customer-centricity in a rapidly changing business landscape.

The UK Customer Experience Awards is accredited with the prestigious Gold Awards Trust Mark from the Independent Awards Standards Council, and as always is proud to be partnered with Cranfield School of Management, Barnardo’s, and the Customer Experience Professionals Association.

Awards International CEO Neil Skehel said: “The UK Customer Experience Awards has grown exponentially to become the biggest CX event of its kind in the world, and we are incredibly proud to be marking its tenth anniversary. Customer Experience is now a brand’s most defining characteristic, and it is impossible to overestimate its importance to the economy. These awards play such an important role in not only celebrating achievements, but also setting the standard for organisations to follow if they are to be successful in this new era where the customer really is at the heart of everything.”

Click here to register interest for the 2019 UK Customer Experience Awards. An Early Bird ticket offer is also available.

 

 


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 13, 2019
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2min229

Leading UK video game retailer GAME has partnered with Customer Experience measurement firm Service Management Group (SMG) to drive field engagement and customer loyalty.

GAME is using the SMG customer feedback management platform to collect, analyse, and share feedback data while working side-by-side with SMG’s client insights team to uncover key customer loyalty drivers.

Founded in 1992, GAME is an established specialty retailer that offers video games, consoles, and accessories at more than 300 retail locations across the UK. Known for midnight product launches, overnight gaming “lock-ins”, and live events, GAME is both a platform and contributor to the gaming community.

Dave Howard, GAME Retail UK Managing Director, said: “With technology that allows us to capture location-level feedback and an experienced research team that delivers actionable insights, SMG is the ideal CX partner for our organisation. The insights from this programme will not only improve our retail operations, they’ll help us more effectively train our employees to deliver a better Customer Experience.”

Jeremy Michael, SMG Managing Director – EMEA, added: “With the constant challenges on the high street, it’s great to see GAME reaffirm their intentions to tangibly improve the in-store experience. The focus on creating an inspiring customer journey will, without a doubt, lead to greater consumer loyalty and long-term sales.”


CXM Editorial TeamCXM Editorial TeamFebruary 8, 2019
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5min444

The Customer Experience Professional Masterclass led by international CX consultant and author Ian Golding, is going from strength-to-strength in 2019 with more satisfied participants than ever.

The two-day class – which is followed by an opportunity to take the CCXP exam following a preparation workshop – sees participants learn the skills and knowledge needed to move a business towards full customer-centricity.

Featuring interactivity, discussions, case studies, and more, Ian, author of Customer What? The honest and practical guide to customer experience, is helping shape the CX landscape in the UK and beyond, empowering a new generation of professionals ready to put customer centricity at the heart of their organisations.

The recent February CX Masterclass was a huge success, and saw eager participants arrive in Stevenage from across the UK – and further afield – to engage.

Speaking of his experience, Ben Washburn, a CX Manager with legal software firm Hyperlaw, said: “I had a fantastic few days at the CX Masterclass. Customer Experience is such a crucial area of business that often doesn’t get the attention it deserves. If deployed properly, it is key to any successful business.

“A huge thank you to Ian for the eye opening insight and all the other attendees for a thoroughly enjoyable two days.”

Mary Geoghegan, a Senior Global Customer Service Leader with the national College of Ireland, said: “I was very impressed with Ian’s delivery of training, his passion, and his support to go above and beyond with his mentoring. Having completed the class I feel re-energised, re-focused, and totally positive that this is the area of business I want to be in and one in which I can make a difference.”

Customer Experience Leader with Bupa Global, Dean Arcan, flew in from Copenhagen to take part and was thrilled to learn from Ian, who also applies his knowledge in judging panels for various CX awards events such as the UK Customer Experience Awards.

“Ian is one of the most inspirational leaders I’ve ever met,” he said.

“He is extremely knowledgeable, passionate, and humble. He is a true example of a leader with purpose and integrity, who is committed to adding value to people.

I feel as though this Masterclass has been a milestone event in my career. I’ve learned so much I’m almost bursting with enthusiasm – even more than usual!

“Under Ian’s guidance I know I will be able to channel this a lot more effectively going forward. Keep doing what you are doing Ian, you are changing lives!”

Meanwhile, Sophie Rugg, a Customer Insight specialist with Wakefield and District Housing, described the Masterclass as “hands down the best training I have ever attended.”

She continued: “Ian is an absolute CX expert and delivers the class with clarity and an infectious enthusiasm. He has an incredible knack for dealing with complex topics with simplicity. I have come away from the class glowing and buzzing with new ideas. I can’t recommend tit highly enough.”

The next CX Professional Masterclass will take place at the Business & Technology Centre in Stevenage on April 23-24, with the CCXP Exam Workshop on the 25th. Click here to register.

For all Masterclass queries, please contact Antonija at antonija@cxm.co.uk.

 


Ian GoldingIan GoldingFebruary 7, 2019
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4min405

Customer Experience specialist Ian Golding, author of Customer What: The Honest and Practical Guide to Customer Experience, writes for Customer Experience Magazine offering expert insight to help businesses improve their CX offering. 

To ask Ian a question on how to boost the Customer Experience provided by YOUR business, please email your question to editor@cxm.world. The best questions will be featured in future instalments.

Ian also leads the CX Professional Masterclass. Click here for details of upcoming Masterclass dates.

Should any business (irrespective of size) hire an individual who possesses an understanding of the competencies and capabilities required for an organisation to become sustainably customer-centric?

The answer to this is, in my humble opinion, is simple…..YES!

As anyone who has heard me speak, or read my thoughts on the subject of Customer Experience in the past will know, CX is now recognised globally as a bona fide profession. This fact demonstrates that like all professions, there is a ‘science’ that defines the work that someone in a Customer Experience role performs. The ‘science’ is formed of six competencies, established by the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA). These are:

Customer-Centric Culture

Voice of the Customer, Customer Insight, and Understanding

Organisational Adoption and Accountability

Customer Experience Strategy

Experience Design, Improvement, and Innovation

Metrics, Measurement, and ROI

This is a broad set of subject areas that Customer Experience Professionals (CXPs) are expected to have a good working knowledge of. The best CXPs in the world apply the science in a way that is appropriate to every and any situation/scenario they face. If an organisation has an aspiration to become sustainably customer-centric, it will find it extremely difficult to do so if it does not contain the expertise and specialisms to make it a tangible reality.

What official title an organisation gives someone with these skills is actually not that important; what is critical is that the organisation recognises the importance of Customer Experience capability and enables those with the skillset to work alongside their colleagues to drive a cross-functional, collaborative approach to becoming customer-centric.

To find out more about the Certified Customer Experience Professional qualification, visit the CCXP website.

To find out more about Ian’s CX Masterclasses and CCXP Exam Preparation Workshops, click here.


Laura ArthurtonLaura ArthurtonFebruary 5, 2019
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6min356

Rapid technology advances and the advent of high-speed internet connectivity have allowed consumers to be more connected than ever before.

Mobile phones, tablets, and computers that were once built for simple daily chores such as text messaging and browsing the internet can now be connected to smart homes, wearable technology, and virtual reality devices, and many of us would be lost without them.

When it comes to shopping, the era of technology ubiquity that we live in has created a landscape where consumers are comfortable with the sight of a computer screen or iPad in a high street store, or are perfectly happy making most of their purchases online. At the same time, customers are becoming much more discerning in terms of the quality of advice and guidance they receive before making a purchase.

While many see this high-speed connectivity and presence of technology as a threat to the role of human staff – and a possible end to physical stores – consumers’ desire for comprehensive advice, allied with their openness to using technology, presents an opportunity for retailers to empower their human staff to serve customers more effectively in-store.

Technology: building human connections, not breaking them

As the general population becomes more and more accustomed to technology pervading every aspect of their daily lives, recent research we conducted revealed that almost seven in ten consumers (69 percent) – rising to 86 percent amongst the millennial generation – believe that technology will be a powerful tool in helping retailers build stronger relationships with their customers. While this indicates that shoppers are becoming increasingly comfortable with technology in retail, there is also strong evidence to suggest that it can be used to retain and enhance the human element of the customer experience, rather than supersede it.

To support this point further, a majority of survey respondents (56 percent, including 64 percent of millennials) believe it is important to speak to someone in-store before making a high-value purchase. This reveals a clear desire for an additional level of personalisation and guidance provided by a human member of staff, and proves that the human touch in retail is far from dead.

How to enhance the human touch

The growth of automation has led many to fear that people may lose their jobs to machines, and the retail sector hasn’t escaped these concerns. However, what this research has shown is that consumers still consider human input an essential component of the shopping and purchasing process.

With this in mind, retailers need to focus on how they can use the power of technology to complement and support the roles of human sales and customer service associates. Intelligent guided selling (IGS) tech is one of many ways this can be achieved, by making it considerably easier for a member of staff to walk a customer through a range of product choices and configurations. It can also be used to manage customer interactions across all sales channels, enabling a greater understanding of today’s increasingly omni-channel shopper.

Striking the balance

When it comes to today’s shopper, it is important for retailers to understand that face-to-face shopping is far from dead; if anything, it has become more important than ever before. The desire to see and touch products, while benefiting from personalised guidance and the expertise of a sales associate, remains extremely important. At the same time, it is also crucial to remember that there is a need to strike a balance between giving customers the support they need, while respecting their independence and giving them the space to make their own decisions, in their own time.

Consumers believe in technology. If it can be used to empower, rather than inhibit, the role of staff, retailers can reach a happy medium where customers are given the right balance of technological efficiency and human intervention, and staff continue to feel valued in their positions. This, in turn, maximises the chances of maintaining both customer satisfaction and staff fulfilment, both of which should be held in the highest regard by any retailer looking to maintain competitive advantage.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthFebruary 5, 2019
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2min286

Nationwide is the UK’s most trusted financial service provider for 2018, according to new research from experience management company and former UK Customer Experience Awards entrants Qualtrics.

The research, which surveyed 1,000 UK consumers about the banks and financial services they use, explored aspects including customer loyalty and trust, and the technology trends that are defining the future of banking.

Of the UK’s most-used banks, Nationwide, RBS, and Barclays have the highest levels of customer trust and there’s a direct link to customer engagement, with those banks seeing higher levels of loyalty, with 86 percent of RBS customers and 75 percent of Nationwide customers saying they are likely to stay with their bank for the next two years, compared to an average of 68 percent across the sector.

Commenting on this finding, Luke Williams, CX strategy lead at Qualtrics said: “It’s long been said that customer trust takes a lifetime to build and a moment to destroy. In our experience, this isn’t the case. Customers do not stop trusting brands because of one specific crisis – no matter how severe. In reality, customer trust is eroded over time through continuous, disappointing experiences.

“The brands that have come out on top in our trust index do not have a magic formula, they are simply providing consistent experiences that regularly meet the expectations of their customers. For the most part, this comes down to listening to customers and understanding the little things that define a great experience. That is where true trust, and ultimately, true customer loyalty is forged.”


Sanjiv GossainSanjiv GossainFebruary 5, 2019
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8min531

It seems that everywhere we go, every place we visit, every time we buy something, we are asked to rate our experience.

There are even adverts in mainline stations encouraging us to provide feedback on our station experience with the inducement of possibly winning something. It therefore may not come as a great surprise that nearly three-quarters of the 1,000 brands surveyed as part of new research from Cognizant identify customer experience (CX) as crucial to their business.

But, while it is clear that every brand wants to offer the best possible CX at every opportunity during every interaction with consumers, there are marked discrepancies between brands’ perceptions of Customer Experience and their customers’. And the reality of executing an excellent CX is more challenging than merely stating the principle.

When we think of the brands with whom we associate great CX, they all have one thing in common: digital innovation. Even companies with very different brand positioning and strategies, like John Lewis and Amazon. Amazon is well-known for reducing the number of clicks it takes to make a purchase, offering tailored recommendations and able to deliver the next day at a price the high street finds hard to beat.

John Lewis was a trail-blazer in CX and has used its experience to become a pioneer in digital sales, becoming an early adopter of click-and-collect. Today, it continues to underpin its commitment to reimagining the shopping experience with the JLAB retail innovation incubator.

However, identifying companies doing it correctly is clearly much simpler than applying the right magic formula yourself. And with so many touchpoints in a customer journey, across digital and traditional channels, the challenge of creating a superior CX is becoming ever more complex.

Such a challenge is overwhelming for many marketers, according to the new Cognizant research, which details the gap between the experiences that consumers expect and what marketers currently feel they are able to deliver. For example, only one-in-five marketers believe they are getting it right, and nearly half do not believe they have the strategy, technology and data to provide consumers with what they truly want.

To help marketing professionals close the CX gap in their own companies, we have outlined five recommendations:

1. Start with strategy and culture

A robust strategy that is embedded throughout the organisation is critical to delivering excellent CX. A commitment to improving CX must be a shared organisational goal, for if the culture does not drive the company to improve customer experiences at every touchpoint, the strategy is merely some smart thinking put down on paper.

2. Understand your customer journeys

Without data, your CX strategy will just be a shot in the dark. Do you know and have you mapped what the customer journey for each product and service you offer is? Are there bumps in the road? Have you looked at where the path to conversion could be made simpler, frictionless and more informative?

Margaret Jobling, Group Chief Marketing Officer at Centrica, was spot on when she claimed how nobody cares about your tech excuses. Consumers simply want a smooth journey that is made to appear effortless: “Historically, there have been a series of separate customer journeys, rather than something consistent and integrated. People don’t care about what’s happening in your business and the back office, so this needs to be tackled. We systematically tackle every customer journey and every pain point and try to make it a less complicated experience. You can’t just put a sticking plaster on a pain point because that will cause a problem somewhere else within the business.”

3. Measure your CX successes

Performance measures are critical to the planning process, management and value of any business. Sales figures and ROI calculations are standard measures to show company income compared to expenditure; however, unless brands improve how they measure CX, any gains will be short-lived. Do you know if your customers are happy? If you do not ask, you will never know.

Establishing customer-focused metrics will help to understand how well you are doing. You could measure Net Promoter Scores, advocacy or satisfaction – or all three. Define your metrics and keep measuring against it to find out how your new strategy and improvements are bearing fruit.

4. Put design at the heart

Design cannot be isolated from CX, as you cannot expect the design team to deliver on the new CX strategy that it has little knowledge of.

Work with the design team to create amazing front-end experiences that are consistent with the brand promise and deliver on the plan to make the customer journey frictionless and more enjoyable. By opening up access to the CX data, designers will be able to see what customers want, and as well as what is or is not working. This empowers them to make the necessary improvements and supports the success of your strategy.

5. Invest in back-end integrations

Silos. Sadly, they have not been consigned to history.

Superior Customer Experience can only be delivered when both the marketing and design teams have access to all data sets, are equipped with the tools to make sense of that data and empowered to create a better journey based on its insights.

While many CMOs and CIOs understand this and have been talking about working together more seamlessly and proactively, our research has shown that the CX gap is wider than many may have feared. It is time to put this talk into action, working together to establish the focus on the customer, not feeding internal divisions.




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