Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthApril 18, 2019
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4min462

London is the most ‘digitally ready’ city in the world, according to new research by Siemens.

The brand has launched a new web-based application which reveals the readiness and potential of six major cities to embrace digitalization and develop new ways of living, working, and interacting.

The Atlas of Digitalization is based around the interconnected themes of Expo 2020 Dubai – Mobility, Sustainability, and Opportunity – and assesses how the fourth industrial revolution has already impacted urban life around the world, and the potential it could have in the future.

Data from 21 indicators has been analysed from Buenos Aires, Dubai, Johannesburg, London, Los Angeles, and Taipei. From this analysis a Digital Readiness Score has been defined, considering areas such as smart electricity and transport systems, internet connections, and digital governance services. The score reveals the current level of maturity of each city’s digital infrastructure, and its preparedness for a connected future.

Juergen Maier, CEO of Siemens UK, said: “It is tremendous that London is leading the charge in digitalization among these global cities. In spite of all the economic uncertainty we have been facing in the UK over the last two years this study shows we are still well placed to achieve leadership globally in the fourth industrial revolution if we continue to invest, innovate and grow responsibly and sustainably.

“However there is more to the UK economy than London and our Northern cities particularly in the Northern Powerhouse must also benefit from innovation and investment. Each city here in the UK and globally must address its own unique mix of challenges and opportunities by embracing digitalization; the key to sustainable, economically vibrant future cities.”

He added: “The Atlas of Digitalization gives us an insight to the current status of digitalization in global cities, and the data tells us London has already made excellent progress. We hope the Atlas will inspire new ways of thinking to shape all the smart cities of tomorrow and realise the global potential of City 4.0.”

The analysis takes into account areas such as innovation, greenhouse gas emissions and time spent in traffic to give the cities a Digital Potential Score, indicating where there is opportunity to grow digital capabilities to transform society and economy. Together, the Readiness and Potential scores illustrate the different capacities each city already has, and where they can develop to effect change and growth.

The Atlas recognises London’s advanced implementation of digital technologies in areas such as the introduction of the congestion charge and the Ultra Low Emission Zone which will dramatically cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Currently road traffic in London is responsible for more than half of the city’s NOx emissions.

The Atlas also identifies potential for digitalization to positively impact areas in London such as improving mobile internet speeds and opening up new opportunities for internet-enabled services based on the Internet of Things, such as ‘vehicle to everything communications’ to improve efficiency.

 

 

 

 


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthApril 16, 2019
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3min579

The finalists for the 2019 UK Digital Experience Awards have been announced, with an exciting line-up of big household brands and smaller innovators competing for recognition.

The event is celebrating its fifth year of honouring the British organisations that offer customers a truly unique Digital Experience while using their technology, websites, and apps, and July 12 is the date those shortlisted for the finals will arrive in London to present before an expert judging panel featuring names including Mark Edgington, founder of Incendiary Blue; Di Mayze, founder of Scratch Consulting; Tiffany Carpenter, Head of Customer Intelligence Solutions at SAS UK; and many more.

This year, finalists will compete for 19 category titles, before an Overall Winner is crowned at a gala ceremony in the Park Plaza Riverbank venue. Categories this year include Best App, Best Digital Change & Transformation, Best Digital Team, and Best Mobile Strategy, among others.

Among the companies shortlisted as finalists for 2019 are EE, Three UK, Sky, Virgin Trains, and PayPoint. For a full list of categories and finalists click here.

Meanwhile, official awards partners this year include children’s charity Barnardo’s, Professor Malcolm McDonald, Martech Advisor, and Cranfield School of Management.

Hosting the event is Awards International, holders of a Gold Standard Awards Trust Mark from the Independent Awards Standards Council.

Speaking of the 2019 UKDXA finalists, Awards International CEO Neil Skehel said: “The standard of entries this year has been nothing short of fantastic, and the projects and initiatives that will be judged on the day are incredibly exciting. A huge congratulations to all finalists, and we look forward to welcoming them to London this summer for a sizzling showcase of Digital Experience innovation.”

For further details and to book seats for the awards, click here.


David WhiteDavid WhiteApril 16, 2019
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4min503

High street cosmetics mainstay Lush recently raised eyebrows by announcing it was quitting its social media channels in the UK.

According to the firm, 16 percent of its social media mentions were negative, a number sure to increase now that the company is no longer operating its Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram accounts.

“Increasingly, social media is making it harder and harder for us to talk to each other directly. We are tired of fighting with algorithms, and we do not want to pay to appear in your newsfeed,” a Lush spokesperson said.

“So we’ve decided it’s time to bid farewell to some of our social channels and open up the conversation between you and us instead.”

The world of social media can be a harsh, competitive, dog-eat-dog environment for brands and publishers. New algorithms implemented by social media platforms now mean that posts from friends and families are prioritised on your newsfeed, leaving brands and publishers in the dark and left with no option but to pay to get their content seen.

So why have brands started to see less social organic reach? This all started in the January 2018 when Mark Zukerberg changed Facebook’s algorithm, stating: “With this update, we will also prioritise posts that spark conversations and meaningful interactions between people.”

The impact this had on brands’ organic social reach was astronomical, and it was undoubtedly a smart move by Facebook (which also owns Instagram), which used its power to force businesses to pay them more.

Meanwhile, recent research from Statista revealed that social media marketing spend has increased year-on-year – a number not likely to reduce anytime soon given these changes:

So, a smart move for Facebook, but is this a smart move for Lush? The answer, in my opinion, is no.

Lush had built up a loyal following of over one million followers, a following which they could use in any upcoming marketing campaigns or for messages they want to convey. It’s important to remember that social media is as much as a customer service channel as it is a sales channel.

Customers who want to air their frustrations will do it, and they will most likely do it on social media. The fact that a brand would choose to ignore this is concerning to say the least.

It might be that 16 percent of Lush’s social mentions were negative, but if ignored this number could dramatically increase and cause serious brand reputation problems.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthApril 9, 2019
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4min595

Nearly half of brands have introduced a dedicated Digital Experience (DX) team to help shape their Customer Experience and journeys across digital channels.

That is the findings in a new report by from experience analytics leader Clicktale. The study, titled Defining Digital Experience shows that 48 percent of brands now have a DX team in place to oversee their strategy. 

It explores the current state of DX, with the help of 200 marketing and CX professionals working in some of the world’s leading US and UK brands. The report examines how brands are building a strategy around Digital Experience, including who is ‘owning’ the function, and how they’re harnessing new technologies.

Until recently, marketing and digital departments have taken the lead in DX responsibility, with 31 percent of respondents claiming ownership lies with marketing, and 27 percent saying it lies with their organisation’s digital team, the report outlines.

Now, dedicated DX departments are more common than data science teams (44 percent) but still behind design/UX and digital analytics teams (54 percent and 52 percent respectively).

The report also describes how the ownership of Digital Experience is still a shared affair in many organisations. Nearly half (44 percent) of respondents claim that digital Customer Experience is merged with other departments. This is also the case for digital analytics and insight (40 percent), design and UX (32 percent), and data science (29 percent).

Clicktale CMO Sara Richter said: “Digital Experience is now a key differentiator for businesses, almost ahead of the products they sell and the prices they charge. Many businesses today get few actual face-to-face interactions with customers. So, if brands want to foster loyalty and repeat revenue, it’s becoming ever more important to understand customers beyond just demographics and purchase history.

“Assigning a dedicated team may be a great first step to building this understanding, but without the right data and analytical ability, it’s difficult to create and shape an effective digital experience approach. Only by gathering true behavioural data and having technologies and analysts in place to draw insights from that data can brands begin to understand their customers on a more intimate level. That in turn will empower brands to build and optimise digital experiences that better serve customers and drive repeat revenue.”

The 2019 UK Digital Experience Awards are taking place in London’s Park Plaza Riverbank on July 12.

 


Patrick HeadleyPatrick HeadleyApril 5, 2019
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9min464

It is clear we are racing head first into a data rich world, meaning businesses cannot afford to mis-manage their customer data.

Customer data management is a fundamental part of a company’s marketing strategy, as 83 percent of companies expect data and analytics to become more important in the business decision making process over the next five years. Optimal data management practices equip a company to gather insights which can be used as the cornerstone for Customer Experience improvement initiatives.

Improved Customer Experience is a clear-cut way to keep customers buying, thus increasing businesses’ revenues. However too many businesses are struggling with how to make sense of the available customer data; they lack the ability to merge cross-channel data thus hindering their ability to draw meaningful insights and consequently optimise revenues.

Therefore, it is of paramount importance for investors to include searching questions on good data practice as a standard part of their investor briefing. Asking the right questions will elicit the necessary insight for investors to determine whether the data management practices embedded at the target business are as mature as they should be and whether they will have an influence on the return on investment. 

Here are five crucial questions which (institutional) investors can pose to corporations to better understand how well a business is managing customer data and whether or not their investment is well placed.

1. What is your share of customer?

It is crucial for investors to understand whether the target company knows their customers’ spending profile, the reason being to understand what potential ‘share’ of the customer’s wallet the target company holds. Customers split their spending across varying providers on a day-to-day basis therefore knowing the share the target company has of each of their customers will help investors determine the growth potential for those customers.

If a target company is able to demonstrate to an investor where the growth potential lies, it will show investors that the target company has access to fundamental insights on customer data and thus are well placed to grow the share of customer further.

2. Are newly acquired customers still buying a year later?

Continuously putting effort into acquiring new customers can be an expensive undertaking for some businesses, especially if those customers are not staying for the long-term. Investors need to look past whether the target company is offering sufficient customer acquisition incentives and focus on whether newly acquired customers are still buying a year later (and more). Customers who disappear shortly after acquisition highlight to investors that marketing spend is being wasted.

The target company should have the necessary data to highlight to investors that they have a proper grasp of their customer insight. Therefore questioning whether a recently acquired customer is still spending a year later will show whether the target company is using customer insight properly and will help gauge how the company will fare in the long-term.

3. Who are your best customers?

Collecting and analysing the right customer analytics will arm the target company with the crucial information needed to see if it is recruiting the best customers to fit the business’ priorities. Typically there is a key group of customers who contribute the most to profits; usually they buy high-margin products, don’t alter or abandon an order, pay on time, and don’t require much attention post-sale.

It is important for investors to ask this question so they can see whether the target company is wasting its time on a cohort of customers who in actual fact turn out to be the least profitable. If investors have clear evidence that the business knows what type of customer profile to keep targeting then they can be reassured about long term growth.

4. Which customers are in growth or decline?

A critical question not to be ignored. If the target company can report that its best customers (high value, high loyal) are in decline, then it is important that customer data is being used appropriately to reverse the trend. It may be the case that these customers are demanding discounts or are just looking elsewhere in the market.

The key for investors when asking this question is to determine whether the target company is using customer insight to pursue look-alike customers. Has a particular group of slightly less valuable customers been targeted with internal growth strategies to replace the declining group with potential high value and high loyalty contenders?

5. Do you have an integrated online and offline view of your customer behaviour?

When it comes to enquiring about the target company’s marketing strategy, the key for understanding marketing success is seeing how much incremental revenue a company’s marketing activity is generating. Any savvy investor will know that incremental revenue trumps isolated marketing campaign measures such as response and open rates.

Customers are influenced on a day-to-day basis by a variety of channels, and as confirmed by our latest research it is companies who combine online and offline methods who produce the highest commercial results. There are now a variety of techniques for harmonising all behaviour/transactions of a given customer into a single, integrated, 3600 view, and only if the target company can achieve this (and demonstrate this) will customer insights be valid and actionable.

Conclusion

Deciphering whether a business has a well-implemented and well-managed strategy for managing their customer data is critical for any investor, as the potential for future growth will be apparent. More and more customer data is becoming accessible and it is up to businesses to collect, analyse and use it to bolster their marketing strategies. Investors need to probe the business for their key customer figures to establish how advanced their customer relationship strategy is, as well as identify which tools are in place to effectively manage and analyse the plethora of available multichannel data for future growth.

Using the above five questions will help investors to get a feel for how mature a company’s customer insight management processes really are.


Tiffany CarpenterTiffany CarpenterApril 1, 2019
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5min711

These days, an ever-increasing number of customer interactions are taking place over digital channels and every digital interaction offers an incredible source of customer intelligence for organisations to tap into. 

With every digital visit, customers leave a valuable trail of digital breadcrumbs. These breadcrumbs give organisations the ability to follow each individual customer journey and each customer’s experience along the way. With every browse, click, like, and share your customer creates their own digital footprint, and with their consent, brands can harness this rich source of data to anticipate and deliver on the needs of each individual customer, optimise each customer’s journey, and unlock new competitive value for the organisation.

Of course, this data must be treated as personal data and companies should provide comprehensive cookie notices to educate users on how they plan to use their personal data, on an opt-in basis.

However, despite many customers still opting-in to share this data, organisations are struggling to tap into this readily available digital intelligence in a meaningful and effective way.

There are five recurring challenges that create barriers to unlocking the true value of digital data.

1. Tagging is still the predominant method for digital analytics tools to capture data. Not only is there cost and time involved in creating, testing, and deploying these tags, but they need to be constantly updated; every time there’s a new area of interest or there’s changes to the website. This invariably leads to delays in campaigns, missing data and lost opportunities.

2. Many digital analytics solutions focus on visits, page views, clicks, and campaign triggers. The data collected is rarely at an individual customer level. This makes it really challenging to join digital data up with offline data from CRM or single customer view systems, where data needs to be held at individual customer level.

3. Too many organisations are focused only on behavioural data – what a customer clicked on and what they saw, rather than experiential data. Experiential data could include what a customer didn’t see, what price they were quoted or what products were not in stock. Collecting behavioural data without experiential data often leads to an incomplete or misleading picture of cause and effect.

4. The number of digital channels, technologies, and techniques for measuring Customer Experience within those channels has exploded, but the data and insight is held in siloes making it difficult to obtain a joined-up view of the Customer Experience.

5. By the time data is extracted from the digital channels and analysed for insights, the customer has already completed their interaction. Organisations are still reporting on the past and unable to action data in real time to impact the Customer Experience ‘in the moment’.

 

Organisations leading the field in digital intelligence are opting for a single view of individual customer level behavioural and experiential data across digital channels that can be easily joined up to offline data, to gain a much deeper insight into the customer journey.

Being able to analyse data at this level of detail is enabling these organisations to go beyond the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of traditional digital analytics and answer the more valuable ‘who’ and ‘why’ questions. Who are my most and least valuable customers? Why do they behave as they do on my digital properties? What simple changes could I make to alter some of this behaviour?

By capturing granular, time-stamped customer level data from every digital interaction about everywhere your customer went, everything they did and didn’t do, and everything they see and didn’t see, organisations can optimise their Customer Experience and create competitive advantage.


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMarch 27, 2019
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3min635

A plan by fast food giant McDonald’s to bring Digital Experience to the drive-thru could be a risk, it has been warned.

The company has announced plans to make it’s biggest deal in two decades – the purchase of tech firm Dynamic Yield for more than $300 million. It will allow McDonald’s to incorporate the firm’s technology at drive-thru locations to react to various factors, such as weather and demand inside the restaurant.

The deal is part of a plan by McDonald’s to upgrade up to 2,000 restaurants in the US, at a cost of almost $1 billion, increasing the number of digital menu boards and self-serve kiosks.

The new digital drive-thru tech has been trialled at various US sites, with plans underway for a US-wide, and eventually international, roll-out.

McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook said of the Dynamic Yield deal: “With this acquisition, we’re expanding both our ability to increase the role technology and data will play in our future and the speed with which we’ll be able to implement our vision of creating more personalised experiences for our customers.”

However, some experts have warned that the plan could present problems for McDonald’s, and other firms keen to increase their tech provision through company purchases.

Raj Badarinath, VP of Marketing at San Francisco-based firm RichRelevance – which helps customers like John Lewis and Not On The High Street boost online experiences – said: “Tech acquisitions present a paradox. On the one hand, retailers need to invest in tech to stay even with, let alone get ahead of, the competition. On the other hand, tech acquisitions from Retailers can lead to proprietary technology infrastructures that end up hurting a company. So what’s the right balance?

“McDonald’s is an iconic brand, and this is a bold move for them. Will this work out for them? Only time will tell. But one thing is clear – Personalisation is here to stay, and the chequebooks are coming out to prove it.”


Paul AinsworthPaul AinsworthMarch 27, 2019
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5min451

Controversial EU legislation designed to limit the sharing of copyrighted content online could “negatively impact” smaller firms, with some opponents warning it could put them out of business altogether.

The Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive was passed by the European Parliament this week, with its most discussed component, Article 13, sparking fears for the very future of some companies.

Article 13 is designed to force online platforms to block and remove copyrighted content from their websites. Currently, platforms such as Facebook and YouTube remove such material when requested to do so by copyright holders, but Article 13 states the sites will now be responsible for identifying and removing the content themselves.

The aim of the legislation is to ensure that creators are better protected when making content that is widely shared online, and certain sites will now be forced to install upload filters to block copyrighted material being made available through their platforms from anyone other than the creators themselves.

The legislation states that websites exempt from the new rules are those that have been available for less than three years, have an annual turnover of less than €10 million, and have fewer than five million unique monthly visitors.

The passing of the vote by Brussels has sparked fury, with a spokesperson for rights group The Electronic Frontier Foundation claiming the European Parliament has “abandoned common sense and the advice of academics, technologists, and UN human rights experts.”

Meanwhile, a second divisive part of the legislation, Article 11, says search engines and news aggregators will be charged a “link tax” to display snippets of news they are linking to.

Supporters of the legislation hailed its passing, and the European Commission’s Vice-President for the Digital Single Market, Andrus Ansip, and Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, said in a joint statement: “This Directive protects creativity in the digital age and ensures that the EU citizens benefit from wider access to content and new guarantees to fully protect their freedom of expression online. The new rules will strengthen our creative industries, which represent 11.65 million jobs, 6.8 percent of GDP and are worth €915,000 million per year.”

However, Frances Doherty, a partner at international law firm Dorsey & Whitney, and one of the preeminent tech industry lawyers in London, warned the new rules stand to impact not just big tech giants, but smaller companies and startups.

“The final approved text of the directive has been amended to address some concerns raised; including subjecting start-ups to lighter regulation and permitting the sharing of hyperlinks to news articles accompanied by individual words or short extracts,” she said.

“However care will need to be taken to ensure that smaller players are not negatively impacted by the new rules which ultimately have been designed to limit the powers of tech giants. Attention is now likely to turn to the detailed implementation of the directive at a national level and the interpretation taken by member states with some of the tech giants already looking ahead to the discussions to be had there.

“The European Parliament’s approval of the draft copyright directive permits the directive to progress to the next stage of approval by the European Council. The text of the directive has been the subject of much debate especially generating strong reaction from the tech giants who see that it is likely to impose greater obligations and liabilities on them -particularly in relation to the licensing of copyrighted content – which could have a significant impact on some aspects of their business models.”


Peter TetlowPeter TetlowMarch 26, 2019
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5min516

Digital transformation is the latest trend that every organisation, in every sector, wants a piece of.

In the customer management industry in particular, ‘digital innovation’, ‘digital transformation’ or ‘going digital’ are key phrases heard on almost a daily basis, with organisations keen to impress their customers by adopting the latest technology and ‘added extras’ to make their offering stand out from the crowd. Everyone wants it, although what ‘it’ is, is open to debate. Is it just a case of jumping on the latest bandwagon, or are organisations actually looking to provide a better service for their customers?

Should the industry even talk in these terms? Does ‘digital’ really exist?

A customer will never casually mention to their friend that they wish their bank or mobile phone provider was more digital, or that a really good piece of digital transformation is exactly what they’re looking for when it comes to renewing their annual contract. What they do say, however, is that they wish they didn’t need to contact their provider at all, or when they did, they were given the right answer quickly, or that the matter was resolved without the need for multiple levels of increasingly complex Interactive Voice Response (IVR) or various call transfers.

In an ideal world, a customer simply wants to be able to get the answer to their question in as few steps as possible, in a simple, easy to understand way. Really, they just want answers.

In the ‘real’ world, digitalisation isn’t the solution that will make an organisation stand out from the crowd or encourage repeat business or orders. Digitalisation won’t make a customer share their story about their relationship with the brand in question; only a great customer service will do that.

As an industry, the more we talk about ‘digital transformation’ or ‘going digital’, the more we fall into the age old trap of looking internally and letting our team structure dictate our thinking, rather than putting ourselves in our customers’ shoes and seeing things from their point of view. What will really make a difference to the customer and the experience they receive from an organisation? Which new or existing initiatives – digital or not – can actually positively contribute to the business’ strategy and future plans, driving growth and increasing revenue?

The fact is, using jargon the customer doesn’t care about usually means the organisation is providing a service the customer probably doesn’t care for.

That being said, the latest technology undoubtedly plays a critical role in improving the Customer Experience and numerous businesses have strong evidence of how it has positively contributed to their success. However, all improvements must start and end with the customer: understanding their experience, their individual journeys and touchpoints, and what they truly want from their interaction with the brand.

If the organisation bypasses the wants and needs of their customers in a rush to ‘go digital’, they run the risk of misunderstanding or worse, ignoring something really important to them, in favour of deploying the latest piece of technology to show competitors their digital credentials.

The industry’s thinking needs to change. Doesn’t a well thought through chatbot that enhances the CX fall into the bucket of ‘CX transformation’ rather than ‘digital transformation’? Again, the customer won’t be saying to their friends that they had a great Digital Experience; they will be saying simply they had a great experience – so isn’t that where the focus should be?

If the customer doesn’t use the ‘D word’, should we? Shouldn’t we focus on the customer and seek to enhance their experience, rather than trying to label the improvement with the latest trend?


Richard WillisRichard WillisMarch 25, 2019
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7min489

According to Forrester, over the next five years western European online retail sales will grow at over three times the rate of total retail sales.

What’s driving this growth?

It comes as no surprise that consumers’ adoption of digital devices, particularly smartphones, plays a substantial role. With Forrester estimating that 84 percent of online adults in the UK, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain use smartphones, always-connected consumers will continue to drive online retail sales across Europe.

But when it comes to ‘m-commerce’ – with the purchase actually being transacted on a mobile device – its promises always seem to lie just around the corner. For a number of years we’ve seen retail predictions that this is the year for mobile, but has it ever really come true? And will 2019 be any different?

At the risk of joining in with the crystal ball gazing, 2019 may mark a watershed in mobile retail – but only if retailers can seize the opportunity that is now on offer.

The mobile opportunity

No one claims that mobile will surpass other retail channels in terms of conversions in the foreseeable future. In-store, where consumers can examine items and talk to knowledgeable sales assistants, still provides a unique experience and should never be compromised; meanwhile, traditional online retail presents the shopper with enormous choice on an easily viewed browser.

But mobile does have a key role to play in shoppers’ experience. Whilst our recent research showed 11 percent of UK shoppers planned to use mobile as their preferred channel in the run-up to Christmas 2018, it also revealed that of those using mobile, almost 40 percent were using it to look for inspiration for gifts rather than make the actual purchase.

We also found that just under a third of shoppers planned to use mobiles to check online prices while in-store (the old ‘showrooming’ phenomenon). This insight is supported by figures from Deloitte’s annual UK mobile consumer survey, which reveals the rising influence of smartphones on retail sales – including how 84 percent of millennials claim to use their phones for shopping assistance while in a store.

How to keep shoppers coming back

It’s clear that mobile is a large and increasingly important part of the Customer Experience journey. The challenge for retailers – and their great opportunity – is ensuring that the mobile experience is easy to navigate and consistently fantastic, whether shoppers are making purchases, looking for gift inspiration, or comparing prices.

Retailers might think that the best way to turn browsing into sales is by offering something that others don’t – and to some degree they’re right. But getting the basics correct counts for much more than a gimmick.

According to Forrester, smartphone-savvy consumers have high expectations for mobile experiences, with 61 percent of shoppers more likely to return to a website if it is mobile-friendly.

What steps can retailers take to ensure their mobile sites keep shoppers coming back?

For starters, m-commerce sites should be optimised for every device and mobile OS. Differences in screen size and resolution, button placement, or operating system can have a huge effect on the mobile experience. Retailers often claim that they optimise their websites for every device, but do they take into account the small factors which can have big consequences on the path to purchase?

One example is placing the checkout or ‘Buy Now’ button in the space where push notifications usually appear. This could lead to the user becoming distracted or accidentally clicking out of the purchase – perhaps a small problem but one which, multiplied by thousands of users, could severely affect sales.

Another key consideration is designing websites to be mobile-first. Many websites carry a large amount of content that is right for bigger screens, such as long blogs, videos, or interactive content. Mobile-first sites, on the other hand, need to be crisp, clear, uncluttered and easy to navigate, with visuals specifically designed for mobile devices.

Finally, we would urge retailers to think about devices holistically. M-commerce is about much more than buying something through your device’s browser. An effective strategy should embrace loyalty apps with a range of functions that optimises navigability, provides a variety of services, and boosts loyalty. This could include self-service options such as checking availability and setting up click-and-collect delivery options, or providing product reviews, social integration and single-click ordering.

By adopting a thorough m-commerce strategy, retailers have a unique opportunity to do much more than just operate another sales channel. Providing a great mobile experience will differentiate retailers in a crowded market and make them the first choice for the generations who were practically born with a mobile device in their hand, whilst also appealing to the masses that are always shopping. And, unlike many of the premature promises about mobile, this future is tantalisingly close.




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